Industry


Animal shelter's homeless-shooing robot gets the boot

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The nonprofit faces $1,000 per-day fines imposed by the city if the roving 5-foot-tall Autonomous Data Machine dubbed "K-9" is caught making the rounds without a proper permit. This shouldn't be an issue, however, as the SPCA has presumably returned the $6-per-hour rental robot with a "commanding presence" to its maker, Silicon Valley startup Knightscope, following significant public uproar and threats of retribution. The backlash began in earnest after the San Francisco Business Times published an interview with SF SPCA President Jennifer Scarlett in which she implied that the robot, adorned with stickers of cute-as-a-button kittens and at least one life-sized Chihuahua, was enlisted with the purpose of shooing away homeless San Franciscans living in encampments on the fringes of the SPCA campus, which encompasses an entire city block in the rapidly gentrifying Mission District. San Francisco, which is in the throes of a seemingly never-ending affordable housing crisis, has the sixth highest largest homeless population in the United States. Just under 7,000 people are living on San Francisco's streets per estimates from the Department of Housing and Urban Development although local authorities and homeless advocacy groups believe the number to be much higher.


NASA uses Google machine learning for exoplanet detection ZDNet

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An eighth planet orbiting a Sun-like star over 2,500 light years away called Kepler-90 has been detected by running the data from NASA's Kepler Space Telescope through a Google neural network. The network was trained using 15,000 previously vetted signals from the Kepler exoplanet catalogue, NASA explained, before it moved on to learning how to detect weaker signals. "We got lots of false positives of planets, but also potentially more real planets," said NASA Sagan postdoctoral fellow Andrew Vanderburg. "It's like sifting through rocks to find jewels. If you have a finer sieve, then you will catch more rocks but you might catch more jewels, as well."


Set of reels. Mary O'Neill's Fancy, The Crock Of Gold, Leaving Road To Turn

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This set of Irish tunes was generated by the irish-RNN recurrent neural network and played by midi instruments. All details can be found here: http://irishabc.com


How Artificial Intelligence Will Change Corporate Governance

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Growing investments in Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology have transformed many areas in the business world, especially among high-tech and financial organisations. External spending on AI-related projects went up to $12 billion in 2016. Companies looking into AI may focus on the potential for automating low-skill tasks, but they are overlooking a major opportunity. Artificial Intelligence can also play a significant role in corporate governance. AI can help streamline decision-making processes, transform big decisions from gut feelings to data-driven knowledge, and better predict the future outcome of such decisions.


Playing emerging tech catch up in the finance function

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CFOs have an opportunity to cut costs, build for the future, and increase data-driven decision making. I've always been surprised at how finance functions treat their own technology spend. Maybe finance executives are more conservative with their own wallets, or maybe they hold themselves to too high a standard. Either way, they tend to invest less in technology than their counterparts in other functions invest--on average, just 13 percent of tech budgets go toward enterprise functions like finance, risk, and compliance, while IT garners 28 percent and sales and marketing gets 24 percent, according to PwC's 2017 Global Digital IQ Survey. Some CFOs, however, are rethinking the digital investment in their own function--especially the investment in emerging tech, such as robotic process automation (RPA), artificial intelligence (AI), and blockchain.


#25f4cdc712a9

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A week and a half ago I was in Berlin for the hub conference. I had the opportunity to speak on a panel about cybersecurity (no surprise there) and shared my views on how countries and corporate entities can work together. I touched on the need for better channels of communication between the aforementioned. This generated a fair amount of discussion after the panel and all of it was positive. The next day I was off to the airport to head home.


4 key trends to transform the field of Artificial Intelligence in 2018 - ET CIO

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Robin van Ittersum, CTO – AI CompanyBangalore: Technology alone is rarely enough to unlock sustainable business growth. When a new technology is combined with a'new ways of doing business,' true value is created, says Robin van Ittersum, CTO – AI Company. "Through our work and research, we have identified four emerging trends in artificial intelligence for 2018. Executives should learn to shape the outcome rather than just react to it," adds Ittersum. In 2018, more SME businesses will learn how to use their solutions and full service platforms.


Asimov's Laws For Artificial Intelligence

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A week and a half ago I was in Berlin for the hub conference. I had the opportunity to speak on a panel about cybersecurity (no surprise there) and shared my views on how countries and corporate entities can work together. I touched on the need for better channels of communication between the aforementioned. This generated a fair amount of discussion after the panel and all of it was positive. The next day I was off to the airport to head home.


Hoo-boy! This damning Uber letter is a wild ride

Mashable

The disasters that former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick left in his wake at his popular ride-hailing app company was one of this year's biggest tech industry stories. Now, as we wrap up the year, Uber (through a court case) has gifted us a letter detailing many of the company's alleged wrongdoings and spy tactics. The so-called Jacobs letter was written by an attorney representing Richard Jacobs, a former Uber security analyst. It alleges shady and potential illegal operations, including how Uber employees monitored the competition and acquired trade secrets. SEE ALSO: Uber's new CEO says he banned employees from using secure messaging apps for Uber business The letter is among the evidence in the trial between Uber and Waymo, Alphabet's self-driving car division.


'Jacobs letter' unsealed, accuses Uber of spying, hacking

Engadget

Waymo's lawsuit against Uber for allegedly stealing technology for self-driving cars hasn't gone to trial yet, because the judge received a letter from the Department of Justice suggesting Uber withheld crucial evidence. That letter, with some redactions, is now available for all to read and it's not good news for Uber. It was written by the attorney of a former employee, Richard Jacobs, and it contains claims that the company routinely tried to hack its competitors to gain an edge, used a team of spies to steal secrets or surveil political figures and even bugged meetings between transport regulators -- with some of this information delivered directly to former CEO Travis Kalanick. Alphabet's self-driving arm Waymo is making the case that Anthony Levandowski created the autonomous trucking company Otto as a scheme to steal its trade secrets and sell them to Uber. In the letter, it says that members of the Uber SSG team Jacobs worked on traveled to Pittsburgh after it acquired the company to instruct Otto employees on how to use burner phones and ephemeral communications apps to avoid discovery in an expected lawsuit.