Human Interest


Which Robot Vacuum Is Actually Worth It?

Slate

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Tell This Bot About Your Experience of Harassment. It Might Actually Help.

Slate

Better Life Lab is a partnership of Slate and New America. Last summer, while psychological scientist Julia Shaw was visiting San Francisco with three other friends for July Fourth, inspiration struck. They had all been discussing the harassment-related firings at Uber. In some cases, complicity extended beyond the perpetrator to the human resource department: Instead of supporting the employees who came forward about the abuse, it dismissed or ignored them. Other tech companies followed the same old fashioned script: Societally, we tend to disbelieve, blame, or retaliate against victims of sexual harassment and abuse.


Why People Are Obsessed With Mark Zuckerberg's Eyeballs

Slate

All eyes were on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg today as sat through his second Congressional hearing on the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Have you ever really looked at Mark Zuckerberg's eyes? On Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday morning, a significant segment of the American population did. As Zuckerberg dodged stupid questions from U.S. senators and representatives, observers wondered about the two dark bulbs in his head. People on Twitter compared his eyes to those of anime characters, robots, sharks, and dolls.


Pep Talks From Dating Apps Show How "Self-Care" Has Totally Sold Out

Slate

Another day, another sign that Tinder is ruining dating. This week's omen comes from a piece published over at the Outline on the digital pep talks dating apps like Tinder and Bumble are sending to their users. According to Renée Lynn Reizman, reminders to devote all your attention to the slot machine game of endless swiping are now coming with a little something extra. During a recent binge session of Netflix's Queer Eye, Reizman felt her phone vibrate and, "desperately in need of a little confidence boost," she hoped it was a new match from Tinder. While it was indeed a push notification from Tinder, it wasn't a match.


A New Kanye West Dating Service Promises Love Free From Taylor Swift Stans

Slate

The galaxy of extremely niche dating sites has gained a new star--one that promises to help you find someone who loves you like Kanye loves Kanye. That's right, lonely singles are no longer confined to finding each other based on interests like farming or the goth aesthetic. With the release of Yeezy Dating, fans of Kanye West are one step closer to finding someone to argue with about the proper breakdown of their Kanye madness bracket. Slated to launch sometime later this month, the Yeezy Dating website is pretty sparse at the moment, featuring a brief explainer noting that the site is "for fans of the genius Mr. Kanye West." However the site, created through a crowdfunding campaign launched by 21-year-old Yeezus stan Harry Dry, has a relatively active Instagram presence.


Why DNA-based Apps Betray the Open Promise of Online Dating

Slate

Get out of the way, Tinder. There's a new dating app on the scene hoping to disrupt the way we find that one special person to eventually melt down in an IKEA with over the relative merits of a Kvikne wardrobe versus a Trysil. Described by Wired as "a sort of 23andMe meets Tinder meets monogamists," Pheramor's secret to success is your DNA. That's right--for a low-rate of $19.99 plus a $10 monthly membership fee, the Houston-based online dating startup promises to match local singles who are compatible not only socially but genetically.



Tinder Might Feel Like a Dating Wasteland, but It's Not Entirely Useless

Slate

It's a widely accepted fact--at least in my circle of recent college grads--that Tinder, and the world of online dating writ large, is a wasteland. The lure of carefully curated profiles, relative anonymity, and endless swiping seem to bring out the worst behavior--catfishing, terrible bios, and misogyny abound. And even when motives are pure, the nagging idea that there's a better match one swipe away tends to make Tinder interactions feel like placeholders. This, combined with the fact that men swipe right on anything that moves (meaning women are forced to second-guess every single one of their matches), makes the entire situation feel like a huge time suck with little chance of romantic reward.


The Most Recent Trump Dating Site Is a Safe Space for MAGA-ites and Bots

Slate

Every relationship has The Moment. Not the moment when you take your partner home to mom or when you finally compromise on the correct number of pillows to have on your bed. I mean The Moment when your potential boo reveals that they own an All Lives Matter shirt or that they sincerely believe that 9/11 was an inside job. Entering into this growing cohort of dating silos is Trump.dating, a new service that gives "like-minded Americans a chance to meet without the awkwardness that comes with the first conversation about politics."