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LAPD used facial recognition software tied to wrongful arrests

Mashable

When you want the public to trust your use of controversial facial recognition technology linked to two prominent wrongful arrests of Black men, it's perhaps best not to claim you aren't using it in the first place. The Los Angeles Police Department was on the defensive Monday after a Los Angeles Times report found that, despite previous statements to the contrary, the LAPD does in fact use facial recognition tech -- often, in fact. What's more, the software in question, a product of South Carolina company DataWorks Plus, is itself no stranger to controversy. According to the Times, over 300 LAPD officers have access to facial recognition software, and the department used it almost 30,000 times between November of 2009 and September of this year. In 2019, LAPD spokesperson Josh Rubenstein painted a very different picture of his department's relationship with facial recognition tech.


How I discovered the magic of wholesome travel games

Engadget

When even walking to the store can be a risky proposition, travel became one of those things I had to put on hold this year. I cancelled one trip to Charleston, South Carolina and didn't even bother booking the others I had planned. But the itch to explore didn't go away; in fact it intensified as the months dragged on, and I've had to turn to video games to scratch it. At first my needs were relatively modest. Like many others, I dove headfirst into Animal Crossing: New Horizons, making my island into a giant campground and picnic area of sorts -- a replica of the parks I couldn't visit now.


Artificial intelligence could serve as backup to radiologists' eyes - Express Computer

#artificialintelligence

Diagnosing emphysema and classifying its severity have long been more art than science. "Everybody has a different trigger threshold for what they would call normal and what they would call disease," said U. Joseph Schoepf, M.D., director of cardiovascular imaging for MUSC Health and assistant dean for clinical research in the Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine. And until recently, scans of damaged lungs have been a moot point, he said. "In the past, if you lost lung tissue, that was it. The lung tissue was gone, and there was very little you could do in terms of therapy to help patients," he said.


Artificial intelligence takes center stage at chamber event

#artificialintelligence

The Greater Summerville Chamber of Commerce along with Dorchester Economic Development held a virtual, Industry Appreciation event. The virtual gathering, presented by TD Bank, took on the challenging subject of Artificial Intelligence (A.I.). Cathy Hayes from the South Carolina Research Authority, began discussing the modern industrial revolution or Industry 4.0, by saying, when it comes to adopting A.I. companies need to start small and foster a modern culture with a fresh mindset. Traditional thinkers are not welcome and for good reason. Artificial Intelligence has already arrived in everyday life.


How Citibot's chatbot search engine uses AI to find more answers

#artificialintelligence

Citibot is a technology company that builds AI-powered chat solutions for local governments such as Fort Worth, Texas; Charleston, South Carolina; and Arlington, Virginia. With Citibot, local residents can quickly get answers to city-related questions, report issues, and receive real-time alerts via text responses. To power these interactions, Citibot uses Amazon Lex, a service for building conversational interfaces for text and voice applications. Citibot built the chatbot to handle basic call queries, which allows government employees to allocate more time to higher-impact community actions.


Apes Spotted Flying Drone and Smiling

#artificialintelligence

In a new short video that has surfaced on TikTok, apes have been spotted flying drones. The drone is an Autel Robotics Evo and the apes are located in a Myrtle Beach Safari in South Carolina. The video was taken by photographer Nick B. and shows two apes flying a drone. One is standing up using the drone's controller while the other sits beside him holding the drone's case. The video is particularly impressive as the ape seems very much in control of the drone.


Artificial intelligence: A backup and excellent benefit for radiologists

#artificialintelligence

Diagnosing emphysema and classifying its severity have long been more art than science. "Everybody has a different trigger threshold for what they would call normal and what they would call disease," said U. Joseph Schoepf, M.D., director of cardiovascular imaging for MUSC Health and assistant dean for clinical research in the Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine. And until recently, scans of damaged lungs have been a moot point, he said. In the past, if you lost lung tissue, that was it. The lung tissue was gone, and there was very little you could do in terms of therapy to help patients.


Data Scientists Have Developed a Faster Way to Reduce Pollution, Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions - KDnuggets

#artificialintelligence

Polymeric membranes assist with a wide variety of tasks, including water filtration and gas-vapor separation. Designing a membrane for the desired function is more time-consuming than people may expect. However, researchers at Columbia Engineering, Germany's Max Planck Society and the University of South Carolina applied data science to the task to streamline their efforts. More specifically, they combined big data with machine learning to strategically design polymer membranes to act as gas filters. People frequently depend on plastic films and membranes to separate mixtures of simple cases, such as carbon dioxide and methane.


Artificial intelligence could serve as backup to radiologists' eyes

#artificialintelligence

"Everybody has a different trigger threshold for what they would call normal and what they would call disease," said U. Joseph Schoepf, M.D., director of cardiovascular imaging for MUSC Health and assistant dean for clinical research in the Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine. And until recently, scans of damaged lungs have been a moot point, he said. "In the past, if you lost lung tissue, that was it. The lung tissue was gone, and there was very little you could do in terms of therapy to help patients," he said. But with advancements in treatment in recent years has come an increased interest in objectively classifying the disease, Schoepf said.


Recognition of Smoking Gesture Using Smart Watch Technology

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Diseases resulting from prolonged smoking are the most common preventable causes of death in the world today. In this report we investigate the success of utilizing accelerometer sensors in smart watches to identify smoking gestures. Early identification of smoking gestures can help to initiate the appropriate intervention method and prevent relapses in smoking. Our experiments indicate 85%-95% success rates in identification of smoking gesture among other similar gestures using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). Our investigations concluded that information obtained from the x-dimension of accelerometers is the best means of identifying the smoking gesture, while y and z dimensions are helpful in eliminating other gestures such as: eating, drinking, and scratch of nose. We utilized sensor data from the Apple Watch during the training of the ANN. Using sensor data from another participant collected on Pebble Steel, we obtained a smoking identification accuracy of greater than 90% when using an ANN trained on data previously collected from the Apple Watch. Finally, we have demonstrated the possibility of using smart watches to perform continuous monitoring of daily activities.