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Chowbotics is Sending Sally the Salad Making Robot Off to College(s)

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Chowbotics is packing up Sally the salad making robot and sending it off to college. Well, many colleges actually, as the food robotics startup is set to announce next week a bigger push into the higher education market. Chowbotics told us that this school year, students at multiple colleges and universities in the U.S. will be able to buy salads and breakfast bowls from Sally the robot. Those schools include: Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH; College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA; the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada; Elmira College in Elmira, NY; the University of Memphis in Memphis, TN; and Wichita State University in Wichita, KS. These schools join Marshall University in Huntington, WV, which installed Sally in 2018.


Doosan debuts collaborative robot at US trade show

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Doosan cobots have a track record in several markets worldwide including Germany, France and China, with capabilities such as a working radius of 900 to 1,700 millimetres and a load capacity of 6 to 15 kilograms. The company gave a demonstration of six cobots collaborating with two human workers to execute fine motor activities on an auto assembly line. The six cobots conducted nine different applications such as inspection, assembly, placement of parts and more, underlining the fact that cobots can be used in almost any production process. During Automate 2019, RG Industries signed a dealership agreement with Doosan Robotics to be their first distributor in the North American market. Through the partnership, Doosan plans to launch its cobots in nine U.S. states including Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, West Virginia, Connecticut, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia and Delaware.


Marketing & AI: Key Takeaways You Need to Know

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Artificial intelligence is a topic that evokes many opinions and predictions. I have heard people express concern that AI will take jobs away from humans and an overall fear of the technology. However, I have also heard countless others, including Paul Roetzer, explain how AI will enhance human knowledge and capabilities. After attending Marketing Artificial Intelligence Conference (MAICON) this year, I side with the latter. In July, hundreds of marketers gathered in Cleveland, Ohio at MAICON, to better understand AI and how it will impact them now and in the future.


Integrated analysis of the urban water-electricity demand nexus in the Midwestern United States

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Considering the interdependencies between water and electricity use is critical for ensuring conservation measures are successful in lowering the net water and electricity use in a city. This water-electricity demand nexus will become even more important as cities continue to grow, causing water and electricity utilities additional stress, especially given the likely impacts of future global climatic and socioeconomic changes. Here, we propose a modeling framework based in statistical learning theory for predicting the climate-sensitive portion of the coupled water-electricity demand nexus. The predictive models were built and tested on six Midwestern cities. The results showed that water use was better predicted than electricity use, indicating that water use is slightly more sensitive to climate than electricity use. Additionally, the results demonstrated the importance of the variability in the El Nino/Southern Oscillation index, which explained the majority of the covariance in the water-electricity nexus. Our modeling results suggest that stronger El Ninos lead to an overall increase in water and electricity use in these cities. The integrated modeling framework presented here can be used to characterize the climate-related sensitivity of the water-electricity demand nexus, accounting for the coupled water and electricity use rather than modeling them separately, as independent variables.


Healthcare AI Provider Olive is Expanding, Creating 100 High-Tech Jobs in Ohio

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Company Name: Olive Location: Columbus, Ohio Industry Sector: Technology Company Profile: Based in Columbus, Olive is a healthcare-specific artificial intelligence (AI) and process automation company that provides solutions to healthcare organizations across the U.S., including rural hospitals, top clinical laboratories and the nation's leading healthcare management systems. In mid-2018, Olive secured $32.8 million in venture capital to advance its AI product and help scale new product offerings. Additionally, there is a strong demand for Olive's AI product across the healthcare industry. Both the funding and demand give Olive a major boost, and it anticipates that its sales will more than double within the next 12 months. Olive needs to hire skilled software and robotic process automation engineers and other staff to take the product to the next level.


Scientists have discovered our brains communicate in a brand new way

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The human brain is capable of communicating in a way scientists previously thought was impossible. Brain cells can create an electrical field that triggers nearby neurons to pass on a message without any physical or chemical connections. Slow and mysterious waves produced by the brain, which have long been known to exist but whose function has been a long-standing mystery, are responsible. The discovery is so unusual the scientific journal that made the findings public demanded that the experiments were repeated before they were willing to publish. 'It was a jaw-dropping moment, for us and for every scientist we told about this so far, said Dominique Duran, a professor at the Case School of Engineering in Cleveland, Ohio.


How image analysis competitions can promote faster, more collaborative AI research

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The rise of AI in medical imaging has paved way for the improvement of workflow standardization, consistency and dependability imaging providers need in order to achieve the best patient care. However, as when implementing any new kind of technology into clinical workflows, there are challenges. In a special report published Jan. 30 in the inaugural issue of Radiology: Artificial Intelligence, Luciano M. Prevedello, MD, and chief of imaging informatics at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio, and colleagues recognize these challenges, but also offer potential solutions--specifically image-based competitions--which could foster collaborative AI research. The authors noted that although AI holds exciting opportunities for medical imaging, challenges related to data complexity, data access and curation, patient privacy, transferability of algorithms to mass markets and the integration of AI in clinical workflows must be addressed first in order to effectively bring AI to the forefront of augmenting patient care. "Readily available, well-curated, and labeled data of high quality is paramount to performing effective research in this area," Prevedello et al. wrote.


'AI' to hit hardest in U.S. heartland and among less-skilled: study

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Midwestern states hit hardest by job automation in recent decades, places that were pivotal to U.S. President Donald Trump's election, will be under the most pressure again as advances in artificial intelligence reshape the workplace, according to a new study by Brookings Institution researchers. The spread of computer-driven technology into middle-wage jobs like trucking, construction, and office work, and some lower-skilled occupations like food preparation and service, will also further divide the fast-growing cities where skilled workers are moving and other areas, and separate the high- skilled workers whose jobs are less prone to automation from everyone else regardless of location, the study found. But the pain may be most intense in a familiar group of manufacturing-heavy states like Wisconsin, Ohio and Iowa, whose support swung the U.S. electoral college for Trump, a Republican, and which have among the largest share of jobs, around 27 percent, at "high risk" of further automation in coming years. At the other end, solidly Democratic coastal states like New York and Maryland had only about a fifth of jobs in the high-risk category. The findings suggest the economic tensions that framed Trump's election may well persist, and may even be immune to his efforts to shift global trade policy in favor of U.S. manufacturers.


'AI' to hit hardest in U.S. heartland and among less-skilled: study

#artificialintelligence

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Midwestern states hit hardest by job automation in recent decades, places that were pivotal to U.S. President Donald Trump's election, will be under the most pressure again as advances in artificial intelligence reshape the workplace, according to a new study by Brookings Institution researchers. The spread of computer-driven technology into middle-wage jobs like trucking, construction, and office work, and some lower-skilled occupations like food preparation and service, will also further divide the fast-growing cities where skilled workers are moving and other areas, and separate the high- skilled workers whose jobs are less prone to automation from everyone else regardless of location, the study found. But the pain may be most intense in a familiar group of manufacturing-heavy states like Wisconsin, Ohio and Iowa, whose support swung the U.S. electoral college for Trump, a Republican, and which have among the largest share of jobs, around 27 percent, at "high risk" of further automation in coming years. At the other end, solidly Democratic coastal states like New York and Maryland had only about a fifth of jobs in the high-risk category. The findings suggest the economic tensions that framed Trump's election may well persist, and may even be immune to his efforts to shift global trade policy in favor of U.S. manufacturers.


Before Super Bowl, John Madden Hall of Fame bronze bust will tell you stories

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

You will be able to interact with John Madden's bronze bust at the Pro Football Hall of Fame. During his enshrinement speech at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006, iconic Oakland Raiders coach, NFL analyst, pitchman and video game namesake John Madden, remarked that all the bronze busts commemorating Hall members in Canton, Ohio, secretly talk to each other after dark. Now, through a combination of conversational artificial intelligence, augmented reality, 3D animation and facial motion capture, fans attending the Super Bowl Experience in Atlanta next week, or who later visit the Hall in Canton, will be able to "converse" with an interactive version of Madden's bronze bust. You'll launch an app and hold an iOS or Android phone or tablet in front of Madden's actual bust, and ask your question – "Hey coach, what was it like after Super Bowl XI getting carried off the field?" or "What was it like to coach against Vince Lombardi?" The Raiders enjoyed their heyday under coach John Madden, who led the team to a 112-39-7 record from 1969-78.