Saint Martin


People at King's Cross site express unease about facial recognition

The Guardian

Members of the public have said there is no justification for the use of facial recognition technology in CCTV systems operated by a private developer at a 67-acre site in central London. It emerged on Monday that the property developer Argent was using the cameras "in the interests of public safety" in King's Cross, mostly north of the railway station across an area including the Google headquarters and the Central Saint Martins art school, but the precise uses of the technology remained unclear. "For law enforcement purposes, there is some justification, but personally I don't think a private developer has the right to have that in a public place," said Grant Otto, who lives in London. He questioned possible legal issues around the collection of facial data by a private entity and said he was unaware of any protections that would allow people to request their information be removed from a database, with similar rights as those enshrined in GDPR. Jack Ramsey, a tourist from New Zealand, echoed his concerns.


Central Saint Martins college student wants to use Alexander McQueen's DNA to make bag

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Some designers might say their collections contain a little piece of each artist who has influenced them in their work. But none can mean this as literally as Tina Gorjanc, a fashion student from Central Saint Martins college in London. Ms Gorjanc has designed a collection of handbags and jackets, which she wants to make using leather cultivated from Alexander McQueen's own DNA. Tina Gorjanc, a fashion student from Central Saint Martins college in London, has designed a collection of handbags and jackets, which she wants to make using leather cultivated from Alexander McQueen's own DNA The'Pure Human' project envisions using DNA from McQueen's graduation collection from the same college, called'Jack the Ripper Stalks His Victims'. The cells would be taken from the hair and placed in a culture.


Charlotte Nordmoen's robot designer could replace potters

#artificialintelligence

Graduate shows 2016: Central Saint Martins student Charlotte Nordmoen has designed a robotic potter that anticipates a time when human labour is no longer needed. The prototype device has a "human finger" made from silicone attached to a mechanical arm. The implement is used to shape clay in much the same way a real finger would. The system relies on a design programme that uses machine learning and an algorithm to generate its own creations. The software gathers images of vases online and interprets their outlines as basic, common shapes to create a "DNA of vases".