Quebec


Artificial intelligence for very young brains

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Canadian scientists have developed an innovative new technique that uses artificial intelligence to better define the different sections of the brain in newborns during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. The results of this study--a collaboration between researchers at Montreal's CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital and the ÉTS engineering school--are published today in Frontiers in Neuroscience. "This is one of the first times that artificial intelligence has been used to better define the different parts of a newborn's brain on an MRI: namely the grey matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid," said Dr. Gregory A. Lodygensky, a neonatologist at CHU Sainte-Justine and professor at Université de Montréal. "Until today, the tools available were complex, often intermingled and difficult to access," he added. In collaboration with Professor Jose Dolz, an expert in medical image analysis and machine learning at ÉTS, the researchers were able to adapt the tools to the specificities of the neonatal setting and then validate them.


UN, WHO & Mila Map the AI vs COVID-19 Battlefield

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Despite attempts to contain COVID-19 spread, as of March 26 more than 530,000 people had been infected worldwide and the number of new cases continues to grow at an alarming rate. AI tools have already joined the fight, guiding UAVs to automatically disinfect public areas, tracking disease spread vectors, diagnosing patients, etc. A new project from researchers with the UN Global Pulse Data Science Team, the World Health Organization and the Mila – Quebec AI Institute looks at current studies and programs that are using AI to tackle the COVID-19 crisis and suggests some promising future research directions. The team categorizes the AI applications in three areas; medical, which includes individual patient diagnosis and treatment; molecular, comprising drug discovery-related research; and societal. Most clinical applications of AI during the COVID-19 pandemic response have been in medical imaging diagnosis, amid growing interest in using medical imaging for screening and diagnosis.


Top Artificial Intelligence Influencers To Follow in 2020 MarkTechPost

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Yoshua Bengio: Yoshua Bengio OCFRSC (born 1964 in Paris, France) is a Canadian computer scientist, most noted for his work on artificial neural networks and deep learning.[1][2][3] He was a co-recipient of the 2018 ACM A.M. Turing Award for his work in deep learning.[4] He is a professor at the Department of Computer Science and Operations Research at the Université de Montréal and scientific director of the Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms (MILA). Geoffrey Hinton: Geoffrey Everest HintonCCFRSFRSC[11] (born 6 December 1947) is an English Canadian cognitive psychologist and computer scientist, most noted for his work on artificial neural networks. Since 2013 he divides his time working for Google (Google Brain) and the University of Toronto.


The 2020 Data Science Dictionary--Key Terms You Need to Know

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GANs–Generative adversarial networks (GANs) are deep neural network architectures comprised of two nets pitting one against the other, e.g. the term "adversarial"). The theory of GANs was first introduced in a 2014 paper by deep learning luminary Ian Goodfellow and other researchers at the University of Montreal, including Yoshua Bengio. The potential of GANs is significant because they are generative models in that they create new data instances that resemble training data. For example, GANs can create images that look like photographs of human faces, even though the faces don't belong to any real person.


How Canada is Gaining an Edge in Artificial Intelligence?

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Artificial Intelligence these days has become a new key driver of economic growth. It is a significant field in technology right now. While several countries are racing towards AI supremacy, Canada is attracting the world's tech giants that are pouring mammoth amounts in the region. The country is currently in the midst of the AI boom as companies like Microsoft, Facebook, Google, Huawei, among others are spending huge capital on research hubs in Quebec, Ontario and Alberta. Canada is a world research leader and home to extraordinary AI-driven businesses, and has played a vital role in the advancement of AI.


African AI Experts Get Excluded From a Conference--Again

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At the G7 meeting in Montreal last year, Justin Trudeau told WIRED he would look into why more than 100 African artificial intelligence researchers had been barred from visiting that city to attend their field's most important annual event, the Neural Information Processing Systems conference, or NeurIPS. Now the same thing has happened again. More than a dozen AI researchers from African countries have been refused visas to attend this year's NeurIPS, to be held next month in Vancouver. This means an event that shapes the course of a technology with huge economic and social importance will have little input from a major portion of the world. The conference brings together thousands of researchers from top academic institutions and companies, for hundreds of talks, workshops, and side meetings at which new ideas and theories are hashed out.


Canada Is Becoming The Preferred AI Research Hub For Big Tech Companies

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The Canadian artificial intelligence (AI) industry has been growing fast, and the country has been aiming for more through massive AI research. There are signs all over that Canada is already having an AI-driven digital economy as cities are emerging as hubs for AI labs and deep learning research. There is an increase in the number of AI startups in cities such as Montreal, Vancouver, and Toronto, among others. Canada has become a breeding ground for AI innovations. Inc. (NASDAQ: AMZN), Intel Corp (NASDAQ: INTC), and Uber Technologies (NYSE: UBER) have invested significantly in AI research in the country.


Machine learning study: At least nine gender expressions exist in the brain

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The terminology humans have conceived to explain and study our own brain may be mis-aligned with how these constructs are actually represented in nature. For example, in many human societies, when a baby is born either a "male" or a "female" box is checked on the birth certificate. Reality, however, may be less black and white. In fact, the assumption of dichotomic differences between only two sex/gender categories may be at odds with our endeavors that try to carve nature at its joints. Such is the case with a new paper, published recently in the journal Cerebral Cortex, where researchers argue that there are at least nine directions of brain-gender variation.


Oracle Supercharges Cloud Infrastructure With Data Science Platform - SDxCentral

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Oracle supercharged its efforts to take on cloud giants Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform (GCP) and today launched a data science platform that runs as a native service on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. The announcement marks the company's second cloud push of the new year. Last week Oracle announced its Generation 2 Cloud was available in five new regions including Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; Melbourne, Australia; Osaka, Japan; Montreal; and Amsterdam. The new Oracle's Cloud Infrastructure Data Science Platform uses elements of DataScience.com, The vendor claims the new offering can bring data scientists together and aid analysis with capabilities like shared projects, model catalogs, team security policies, reproducibility, and auditability.


5 new faculty member nominations at Mila - Mila

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Mila is happy to announce the nomination of five new faculty members to the Mila team! Guillaume Lajoie was appointed Core Academic Member. Guillaume is an assistant professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics (DMS) at the Université de Montréal. His research is rooted at the intersection of AI and neuroscience where he pursues questions surrounding neural network dynamics and computations, with some applications to neuroengineering.