Quebec


The Initiative for Indigenous Futures on Artificial Intelligence - COOL HUNTING

#artificialintelligence

From the sixth (and most recent) installment of NYU ITP's academic journal Adjacent, entitled Old/New/Next, senior editor Gabriella Garcia's essay "There Is No'Artificial' Intelligence: A Conversation with the Initiative for Indigenous Futures" seeks answers to two questions: what makes something "artificial" and how do we determine "intelligence?" Garcia references the MUTEK Montreal electronic arts festival and a symposium by members of Initiative for Indigenous Futures. IIF co-founder Professor Jason Edward Lewis and Lakota performance artist Suzanne Kite address everything from machine learning, programmed emotions, and the implementation of white supremacy in AI. Observation thus far has been that biases are entrenched in the algorithms coded into our technology--and now is the time to make change.


The Initiative for Indigenous Futures on Artificial Intelligence - COOL HUNTING

#artificialintelligence

From the sixth (and most recent) installment of NYU ITP's academic journal Adjacent, entitled Old/New/Next, senior editor Gabriella Garcia's essay "There Is No'Artificial' Intelligence: A Conversation with the Initiative for Indigenous Futures" seeks answers to two questions: what makes something "artificial" and how do we determine "intelligence?" Garcia references the MUTEK Montreal electronic arts festival and a symposium by members of Initiative for Indigenous Futures. IIF co-founder Professor Jason Edward Lewis and Lakota performance artist Suzanne Kite address everything from machine learning, programmed emotions, and the implementation of white supremacy in AI. Observation thus far has been that biases are entrenched in the algorithms coded into our technology--and now is the time to make change.


MONTRÉAL.AI Montréal Artificial Intelligence - MONTRÉAL.AI

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On October 25, 2018, the first artificial intelligence artwork ever sold at Christie's auction house shattered expectations, fetching $432,500. Today, the House of Montréal.AI Fine Arts introduces: Montréal.AI's Fine Arts Auction, the first international auction dedicated to quintessential fine AI arts. "The Artists Creating with AI Won't Follow Trends; THEY WILL SET THEM." -- Montréal.AI Fine Arts We are getting ready for the first auction. Top art collectors will be able to place bids internationally. On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM EST, the General Secretariat of MONTREAL.AI will present, with authority: "Artificial Intelligence 101: The First World-Class Overview of AI for the General Public".


A new smartphone app will let people identify mysterious drones flying overhead

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The world's largest drone manufacturer has announced plans for a new smartphone app that lets users identify mysterious drones flying around their neighborhood. Developed by DJI, the Shenzhen based drone giant, the unnamed app is targeted for a release in early 2020 pending approval by government regulators. The app will have a range of around .6 miles using WiFi Aware, a new communication protocol that allows WiFi-enabled devices to communicate with one another. DJI announced the new app at the United Nations-sponsored Drone Enable conference in Montreal this week. 'We've created a remote identification solution that works with what people already have,' DJI's Brendan Schulman told Reuters.


Amid privacy backlash, China's DJI unveils phone app to track nearby drones

The Japan Times

MONTREAL, QUEBEC – China's DJI, the world's largest commercial drone maker, said on Wednesday it is developing technology that would allow the public to track the registrations of drones in flight using just a smartphone, amid a broader industry push to make such data available. SZ DJI Technology Co. Ltd. aims to roll out a free app in 2020, pending regulatory approval, that would allow its users for the first time to identify any modern drone with a phone, company executives told Reuters. The push for remote identification technology comes amid regulatory calls for greater oversight of drone flight, on fears that untraceable, unmanned aircraft could be used for spying or accidentally disrupt commercial flights. DJI, which has an estimated 70 percent market share according to industry analysts, demonstrated its drone-to-phone transmission app at the United Nations aviation agency's Drone Enable conference in Montreal. "We've created a remote identification solution that works with what people already have," said Brendan Schulman, vice president of policy and legal affairs at DJI.


Stradigi AI raises $40.3 million to develop business AI solutions

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Stradigi AI, a Montréal-based AI solutions provider and research lab founded in 2014, today announced that it has raised $53 million CAD ($40.3 million) in a series A round led by Canadian institutional funds Investissement Québec and Fonds de solidarité FTQ, with participation from Holdun Family Office, Segovia Capital, Cossette, and company cofounders Basil Bouraropoulos and Curtis Gavura. CEO Bouraropoulos said the influx of capital will accelerate Stradigi's North American expansion, which will include new offices in the U.S., with 50 new positions in research, software, sales, and marketing. Additionally, he says it will bolster development of the firm's freshly unveiled AI platform, Kepler, on the heels of a recently announced partnership with professional services network KPMG. "Investissement Québec and the Fonds de solidarité FTQ, in addition to all the other amazing investors that contributed to this financing, are great partners for Stradigi AI," said Bouraropoulos. "As two of the most respected institutional funds in Canada, with diverse portfolios and deep experience with preparing companies for international growth, IQ and the Fonds will bring tremendous value as we execute our strategy to become one of the top three leading platforms in North America." It's built on an adaptable environment that leverages a software-meets-service model, where guidance from Stradigi's research scientists is provided in tandem with solutions deployed via a secure service.


Shribman: AI comes to hockey, but romance remains

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In a classic start-up setting -- in a former textile plant four miles from where the first hockey match was played a century and a half ago -- a group of high-tech computer engineers are changing Canada's most revered pastime. There -- in sterile cubicles amid lots of wood and windows, with a jelly-bean dispenser and the inevitable dog, all planted in a gentrifying Jewish section of Montreal where Mordecai Richler set his landmark 1970 novel "St. Urbain's Horseman" -- they examine the 4,000 motions they detect players make in the course of each 60-minute game. The result is millions of data points unavailable to fans in the stands, but indispensable for coaches and, ultimately, players. The work being done here is changing the world of sport.


African AI Experts Get Excluded From a Conference--Again

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At the G7 meeting in Montreal last year, Justin Trudeau told WIRED he would look into why more than 100 African artificial intelligence researchers had been barred from visiting that city to attend their field's most important annual event, the Neural Information Processing Systems conference, or NeurIPS. Now the same thing has happened again. More than a dozen AI researchers from African countries have been refused visas to attend this year's NeurIPS, to be held next month in Vancouver. This means an event that shapes the course of a technology with huge economic and social importance will have little input from a major portion of the world. The conference brings together thousands of researchers from top academic institutions and companies, for hundreds of talks, workshops, and side meetings at which new ideas and theories are hashed out.


Samsung hosts annual forum on breakthrough AI tech

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Tech giant Samsung Electronics kicked off its third annual artificial intelligence forum on Nov. 4 in Seoul, where local and global artificial intelligence experts have gathered to share their research projects and discuss future advancements in the technology. At this year's event, presentations will be delivered on a range of technologies, including deep learning, autonomous driving systems and natural language processing. On the first day of the forum, top-notch researchers in the deep learning sector, including Yoshua Bengio of University of Montreal, Trevor Darrell of UC Berkeley, Cho Kyung-hyeon of New York University and Simon Lacoste-Julien of University of Montreal, delivered lectures and presentations on AI technology. Professor Yoshua introduced a concept of an AI solution learning the world like a child, through meta learning and reinforcement learning, while Darrell talked about the latest research trends in autonomous driving solutions that can make decisions in unexpected, complex situations on their own. "The AI technology is already affecting almost every aspect of our daily lives," said Kim Ki-nam, chief of Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology in his opening speech.


NVIDIA Research Takes NeurIPS Attendees on AI Road Trip NVIDIA Blog

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Take a joyride through a 3D urban neighborhood that looks like Tokyo, or New York, or maybe Rio de Janeiro -- all imagined by AI. We've introduced at this week's NeurIPS conference AI research that allows developers to render fully synthetic, interactive 3D worlds. While still early stage, this work shows promise for a variety of applications, including VR, autonomous vehicle development and architecture. The tech is among several NVIDIA projects on display here in Montreal. Attendees huddled around a green and black racing chair in our booth have been wowed by the demo, which lets drivers navigate around an eight-block world rendered by the neural network.