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Swiss Robotics Day showcases innovations and collaborations between academia and industry

Robohub

As the next edition of the Swiss Robotics Day is in preparation in Lausanne, let's revisit the November 2021 edition, where the vitality and richness of Switzerland's robotics scene was on full display at StageOne Event and Convention Hall in Zurich. It was the first edition of NCCR Robotics's flagship event after the pandemic, and it surpassed the scale of previous editions, drawing in almost 500 people. You can see the photo gallery here. Welcome notes from ETH President Joël Mesot and NCCR Robotics Director Dario Floreano opened a dense conference programme, chaired by NCCR Robotics co-Director Robert Riener and that included scientific presentations from Marco Hutter (ETH Zurich), Stéphanie Lacour and Herb Shea (both from EPFL), as well as the industry perspective from ABB's Marina Bill, Simon Johnson from the Drone Industry Association and Hocoma co-founder Gery Colombo. A final roundtable – including Robert Riener, Hocoma's Serena Maggioni, Liliana Paredes from Rehaklinik and Georg Rauter from the University of Basel – focused on the potential and the challenges of innovation in healthcare robotics.


How to compete with robots

Robohub

When it comes to the future of intelligent robots, the first question people ask is often: how many jobs will they make disappear? Whatever the answer, the second question is likely to be: how can I make sure that my job is not among them? In a study just published in Science Robotics, a team of roboticists from EPFL and economists from the University of Lausanne offers answers to both questions. By combining the scientific and technical literature on robotic abilities with employment and wage statistics, they have developed a method to calculate which of the currently existing jobs are more at risk of being performed by machines in the near future. Additionally, they have devised a method for suggesting career transitions to jobs that are less at risk and require smallest retraining efforts.


Deep Science: AI simulates economies and predicts startup success – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

Research in the field of machine learning and AI, now a key technology in practically every industry and company, is far too voluminous for anyone to read it all. This column aims to collect some of the most relevant recent discoveries and papers -- particularly in, but not limited to, artificial intelligence -- and explain why they matter. This week in AI, scientists conducted a fascinating experiment to predict how "market-driven" platforms like food delivery and ride-hailing businesses affect the overall economy when they're optimized for different objectives, like maximizing revenue. Elsewhere, demonstrating the versatility of AI, a team hailing from ETH Zurich developed a system that can read tree heights from satellite images, while a separate group of researchers tested a system to predict a startup's success from public web data. The market-driven platform work builds on Salesforce's AI Economist, an open source research environment for understanding how AI could improve economic policy.


BrainChip and NVISO Partner on Human Behavioral Analytics in Automotive and Edge AI Devices

#artificialintelligence

The initial effort will include implementing NVISO's AI solutions for Social Robots and In-cabin Monitoring Systems on BrainChip's Akida processors. Developers of automotive and consumer technologies are striving for devices that better respond to human behavior--which requires tools and applications to interpret human behavior captured from cameras and sensors on devices. However, these environments can be constrained by limited compute performance, power consumption, and cloud connectivity lapses. Since information is not sent off-device, user privacy and security are also protected. NVISO's technology is uniquely able to analyze signals of human behavior such as facial expressions, emotions, identity, head poses, gaze, gestures, activities, and objects with which users interact.


Why digital twins could be great for cities

#artificialintelligence

We are excited to bring Transform 2022 back in-person July 19 and virtually July 20 - 28. Join AI and data leaders for insightful talks and exciting networking opportunities. Lugano, Switzerland has long suffered from traffic congestion on its lakefront thoroughfare, and, like many cities, faces the often-competing needs of commuters, residents and tourists. To reduce that competition and ensure more fair and efficient use of infrastructure, city officials are using artificial intelligence to develop digital models that will enable them to "pedestrianize" the lakefront at various times of day, while diverting and managing vehicle flows depending on need and traffic density. This is just one example of how AI-powered digital twins -- which have had a huge impact on improving industrial production and processes -- are being adopted by cities seeking to tackle urban challenges like traffic, garbage collection and air quality. While this technology can potentially provide major benefits for the development of urban policy, there are also serious challenges.


Deep Science: AI cuts, flows, and goes green – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

Research in the field of machine learning and AI, now a key technology in practically every industry and company, is far too voluminous for anyone to read it all. This column aims to collect some of the most relevant recent discoveries and papers -- particularly in, but not limited to, artificial intelligence -- and explain why they matter. This week AI applications have been found in several unexpected niches due to its ability to sort through large amounts of data, or alternatively make sensible predictions based on limited evidence. We've seen machine learning models taking on big data sets in biotech and finance, but researchers at ETH Zurich and LMU Munich are applying similar techniques to the data generated by international development aid projects such as disaster relief and housing. The team trained its model on millions of projects (amounting to $2.8 trillion in funding) from the last 20 years, an enormous dataset that is too complex to be manually analyzed in detail.


How to compete with robots

#artificialintelligence

In a study just published in Science Robotics, a team of roboticists from EPFL and economists from the University of Lausanne offers answers to both questions. By combining the scientific and technical literature on robotic abilities with employment and wage statistics, they have developed a method to calculate which of the currently existing jobs are more at risk of being performed by machines in the near future. Additionally, they have devised a method for suggesting career transitions to jobs that are less at risk and require smallest retraining efforts. "There are several studies predicting how many jobs will be automated by robots, but they all focus on software robots, such as speech and image recognition, financial robo-advisers, chatbots, and so forth. Furthermore, those predictions wildly oscillate depending on how job requirements and software abilities are assessed. Here, we consider not only artificial intelligence software, but also real intelligent robots that perform physical work and we developed a method for a systematic comparison of human and robotic abilities used in hundreds of jobs," says Prof. Dario Floreano, Director of EPFL's Laboratory of Intelligent System, who led the study at EPFL.


Typewise and ETH Zurich collaborate to develop advanced AI text prediction technology - Startup World Tech

#artificialintelligence

Typewise is a Swiss deep tech company. It has announced a new collaboration with Professor Ryan Cotterell of ETH Zurich. He is a professor at ETH Zurich's Department of Computer Science. Typewise is a Swiss deep tech company. It strives to make daily lives easier by'decoding human thoughts'.


Will a robot take YOUR job? Scientists reveal the jobs at highest risk

Daily Mail - Science & tech

While the idea of a robot taking your job may sound like the plot from the latest episode of Black Mirror, a new study has warned that it could become a reality for many people in the future. Researchers from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne have revealed which jobs are most and least likely to be taken by robots. Their findings suggest that meat packers, cleaners and builders face the highest risk of being replaced by machines, while teachers, lawyers and physicists are safe. 'The key challenge for society today is how to become resilient against automation,' explained Professor Rafael Lalive, who co-led the study. 'Our work provides detailed career advice for workers who face high risks of automation, which allows them to take on more secure jobs while re-using many of the skills acquired on the old job.' Based on the findings, the researchers have developed a tool (below) that reveals the automation risk of your job, and how you could reuse your abilities.


Cognitive Intelligence, the augmented Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The global Artificial Intelligence (AI) market size is expected to grow to USD 309.6 billion by 2026, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 39.7% I picked up that you will be speaking at the World AI Conference in town. Maybe for our audience, you can introduce yourself, what you're doing with this Swiss Cognitive, and what is a bit your background? I feel privileged to be able to talk to you about our topic, AI. This is one of my passions. An intro about myself, who I am in a nutshell. Born in Israel, grew up in Switzerland and one of my goals is to Switzerlize the globe. I know we're going to come to that topic later on. That's a whole lot of stuff that keeps you going. In a general way, do you have some fun facts about yourself? I like to challenge most people when they come into the show.