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AI may not predict the next pandemic, but big data and machine learning can fight this one

ZDNet

In April, at the height of the lockdown, computer-science professor Àlex Arenas predicted that a second wave of coronavirus was highly possible this summer in Spain. At the time, many scientists were still confident that high temperature and humidity would slow the impact and spread of the virus over the summer months, as happens with seasonal flu. Unfortunately, Arenas' predictions have turned out to be accurate. Madrid, the Basque country, Aragon, Catalonia, and other Spanish regions are currently dealing with a surge in COVID-19 cases, despite the use of masks, hand-washing and social distancing. Admittedly, August is not as bad as March for Spain, but it's still not a situation many foresaw.


Transfer Learning and Online Learning for Traffic Forecasting under Different Data Availability Conditions: Alternatives and Pitfalls

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This work aims at unveiling the potential of Transfer Learning (TL) for developing a traffic flow forecasting model in scenarios of absent data. Knowledge transfer from high-quality predictive models becomes feasible under the TL paradigm, enabling the generation of new proper models with few data. In order to explore this capability, we identify three different levels of data absent scenarios, where TL techniques are applied among Deep Learning (DL) methods for traffic forecasting. Then, traditional batch learning is compared against TL based models using real traffic flow data, collected by deployed loops managed by the City Council of Madrid (Spain). In addition, we apply Online Learning (OL) techniques, where model receives an update after each prediction, in order to adapt to traffic flow trend changes and incrementally learn from new incoming traffic data. The obtained experimental results shed light on the advantages of transfer and online learning for traffic flow forecasting, and draw practical insights on their interplay with the amount of available training data at the location of interest.


Esteban Granero: how midfielder is fighting coronavirus with AI Sid Lowe

#artificialintelligence

Esteban Granero has some good news, a little light at the end of a long, dark tunnel in Spain, where the coronavirus crisis has left more than 21,000 people dead. "The situation is terrible," says the midfielder, a league title winner with Real Madrid, "but the curve is clearly downward now; we reached the peak on the fourth [of April] and now we're on the way down. Things shift daily but we think at the end of the month, early May, the number of cases will be very low and there will be room for optimism." Granero does not speak lightly. He has been watching the trends carefully.


Esteban Granero: how midfielder is fighting coronavirus with AI – Tech Check News

#artificialintelligence

Esteban Granero has some good news, a little light at the end of a long, dark tunnel in Spain, where the coronavirus crisis has left more than 21,000 people dead. "The situation is terrible," says the midfielder, a league title winner with Real Madrid, "but the curve is clearly downward now; we reached the peak on the fourth [of April] and now we're on the way down.


Is the Growing Robot Revolution Killing Jobs in Japan?

#artificialintelligence

When the beautiful Erica, a humanoid robot talked to a man at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots held last month in Madrid, Spain, the audience marveled at her uncanny human appearance and communication skills. She and many others like her are the prime focus of researchers in Japan, who are trying to understand how humanoid robots can be integrated freely into the world, to work alongside humans. The country which is considered a leader in tech and robotics is now witnessing a robot revolution -- everything from sex dolls to humanoid and industrial robots. According to the 2017 report of International Federation of Robotics (IFR), "The world now includes approximately 1.1 million working robots and machines account for 80 percent of the work in manufacturing a car." The report highlights that in 2016, robot sales in Japan increased by 10 percent to about 38,600 units, reaching the highest level since 2006 (37,400 units).


AI (Artificial Intelligence) Companies That Are Combating The COVID-19 Pandemic

#artificialintelligence

MADRID, SPAIN - MARCH 28: Health personnel are seen outside the emergency entrance of the Severo ... [ ] Ochoa Hospital on March 28, 2020 in Madrid, Spain. Spain plans to continue its quarantine measures at least through April 11. The Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has spread to many countries across the world, claiming over 20,000 lives and infecting hundreds of thousands more. AI (Artificial Intelligence) has a long history, going back to the 1950s when the computer industry started. It's interesting to note that much of the innovation came from government programs, not private industry.


Coronavirus: Spain to use artificial intelligence to automate testing

#artificialintelligence

The Spanish government is planning to test 80,000 people a day for coronavirus with the roll-out of robot testers. Technology will be used to speed up testing of people in Spain, one of the countries hardest hit by the Covid-19 outbreak, with more than 200 deaths so far. According to Bloomberg, Spanish authorities now plan to increase daily testing from about 20,000 a day to 80,000, by using four robots to apply artificial intelligence (AI) to testing. Speaking at a conference on Saturday 21 March, Raquel Yotti, head of Madrid's health institute, said: "A plan to automate tests through robots has already been designed and Spain has committed to buying four robots that will allow us to execute 80,000 tests per day." Because of the ease that coronavirus spreads from person to person, testing has been identified as one of the best ways to control the disease.


Coronavirus robots that 'test 80,000 patients a day' deployed in AI breakthrough

#artificialintelligence

Spain will unleash robots capable of testing 80,000 patients a day into the heart of its coronavirus fight. The Spanish government says it will deploy the machines that will increase testing from its current daily figure of between 15,000 and 20,000. Raquel Yotti, head of Madrid's Health Institute Carlos III, said the plans to deploy the robots are already under way. She spoke as Spain's death toll surpassed 1,300 and the number of cases reached nearly 25,000. She said at a conference: "A plan to automate tests through robots has been already designed, and Spain has committed to buying four robots that will allow us to execute 80,000 tests per day."


Spanish police use drones to fly through neighborhoods encouraging people to stay indoors

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Police in Spain have turned to drones to encourage people to stay indoors and practice social distancing during the country's now surging COVID-19 outbreak. The drones have been equipped with speakers that officers can use to broadcast live messages from their squad cars. The drones are part of neighborhood sweeps police have been implementing to enforce a country-wide lockdown that began on Saturday. The drones have been used in Madrid to help clear parks and other public spaces where many in the country had continued to gather in spite of growing health concerns, according to a report in Popular Mechanics. Under the country's lockdown, which was implemented the same day Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez's wife Begoña Gómez tested positive for COVID-19, people are banned from leaving home for any reason other than to buy essential supplies and medicine or to go to work.


British Airways using drones to automate inventory counts

#artificialintelligence

British Airways' parent company, IAG is implementing some cutting edge automation solutions in response to the rapid pan-industry digitalisation of the air freight sector. Announced on Thursday, IAG Cargo will start using autonomous drones in a move towards full automation of inventory counts in its air cargo facilities, following a successful trial. With a vision to fully automate inventory counts at its air cargo facilities, IAG Cargo has been working closely with FlytBase on aerial inventory scans at its Madrid facility. Inventory counting, while critical to freight and logistics operations, is a massive train on man hours, consuming thousands of hours each year across IAG Cargo's hubs in the UK, Spain, and Ireland. On top of this, rapid global growth in ecommerce and increasing customer expectations of immediacy when it comes to delivery mean that air freight operators are having to increase the frequency of counts.