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The Online Courses You Must Take to be a Better Data Scientist - KDnuggets

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I started in Data Science back in 2015. It was not an intended move but the answer to the needs of my employer. I was working for a company providing automation services to Spanish corporations and we had the need to leverage data to automate complex tasks whose rules could not be easily hard-coded. I had recently graduated as an engineer in the middle of a terrible economic crisis, had some statistical modeling knowledge and was proficient using MATLAB. In 2015 there was not specialized Data Science degrees or boot-camps to jump-start in the field (at least, in Spain) and the naturally closest studies you could have were, in this order: Mathematics (in Spain with a strong focus in becoming a teacher/professor in the public education system) or Software Engineer (most of them more interested in App Development or creating the new Uber of "X" than in boring Data Science stuff back then).


How Data is Redefining A&R's Role In The Modern Music Industry - Hypebot

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Although A&Rs are still looking for the same qualities in an artist as they were fifty years ago, what they're looking for in that same artist's data – and they way they're looking for – it has changed dramatically. Editor's Note: Tommaso Rocchi is a 2020 Master of Arts graduate of The Global Entertainment and Music Business program at Berklee College of Music in Valencia, Spain. Data-driven A&R has been a buzzword for quite some time in the music industry, but also one of its most guarded secrets. Even before the acquisition of Sodatone by Warner Music Group, major and big indie record labels started to switch their mindsets and focus on the advantages of a data-driven approach. Compared to the classic "gut-feeling" expertise of a senior A&R, data analysis allows today's A&Rs to validate their intuition and justify talent acquisition with predictive modeling.


Women Leaders in AI - 2020 - NASSCOM Community

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The excitement of using Artificial Intelligence has not dwindled from the time it has been unfolded. In KPMG study on “living in the AI world 2020: achievements and challenges of AI across 5 industries (retail, financial service, healthcare, transportation, and technology), revealed that 92% of respondents agreed that leveraging the spectrum of AI technologies will make their companies run more efficiently. Amidst the admiration towards AI, IBM created the Women Leaders in AI program in 2019. This was a way to acknowledge the women leading in AI and encourage females to lend a hand in the field of AI. Through this IBM, planned to make the efforts of the honourees more visible to the world. 2020 IBM women leaders were honoured for outstanding leadership in the AI space. Here is the list of women leaders in AI 2020 honorees:- Aarthi Fernandez Who is a Global head of Trade Operations and SEA Trade COO at Standard Chartered Bank? She is a C-suite executive with deep insight on how digitalization can positively disrupt US$17 trillion global trade. She is into deploying AI/Machine learning to make trade financing simple, faster, and better for corporate clients and mitigate compliance risk. Piera Valeria Cordaro She is a commercial Operations Innovation Manager, Wing Tre S.p.A., Italy. She is a speaker, advocating the use of AI in customer operations. Along with her team and with support by IBM Watson, implemented two chatbots, to improve customer experience. Both bots have made it possible to handle a million queries efficiently. Amala Duggirala Who is the enterprise Chief operation and Technology officer, Regions Bank, United States. To handle customers’ inquiries she deployed IBM Watson’s assistant- virtual banker persona, ”Reggie”. From the time of its implementation 4.3 million customer calls have been answered, with 22% of them being handled by AI. Mara Reiff Vice President, Strategy and Business Intelligence, Beli Canada, Canada. She used AI to improve operations, loyalty, and brand. She worked with IBM to install Watson studio Local using Red Hat open shift. This resulted in smarter, fast decision-making with improved customer experience leading to increased sales. Mara suggests everybody to “Make sure to stop and smell the roses. Take each opportunity to learn something new and embrace change”. Amy Shreve- McDonald She is lead Product Marketing Manager for Business Digital experience, AI&T, USA. EVA (Enterprise Virtual Agent) was launched in February 2019, to improve customer chat experience, it uses Watson assistant. This system has been able to handle 45% chats on its own, resulting in reduced costs and expanding 24/7 support. She also received AT&T’s 2019 Visionary Award for her work advocating EVA. Ryoko Miyashita Manager, customer service department, customer service section JACCS CO., LTD Japan. She launched a Watson-enabled operator onboarding tool, that resulted in reduced new operator training period by 30%. The tool has increase customer satisfaction. Her advice to the younger self is “It is important to believe in yourself, but it is equally or more important to believe in people around you. I would encourage myself to have many experiences and garner knowledge to objectively evaluate things, not blindly accept or exclude others’ opinions”. Carol Chen She is Vice President for Global Marketing, Global Commercial, Royal Dutch Shell, United Kingdom. Along with her team, Carol is partnering is planning for digital transformation with the creation of “Oren”- a Smart Minning Platform, by partnering with IBM. This platform will offer an innovative and creative experience for users in the sector to deliver connectivity and integration across the ecosystem. To use AI, she advice commencing with analyzing the business outcome that one wants and customer pain points that one can cater to. The next step would be to determine how to leverage AI and data to solve the problem. Rosa Martinez Cognitive Project Manager, CiaxaBank, Spain. For those who consider using AI, her advice to them is ‘first to understand the business case as it may take time more than expected. This phase can result in a non-AI project example a ‘software as usual’. But moving further with the project there can be more AI application for sure to work on’. Lee- Lim Sok Know Deputy Principal, Temasek Polytechnic, Singapore. Under the leadership of Sok Keow, The higher education institution in Singapore ‘Temasek Polytechnic’ launched the “Ask TP” chatbot in January 2018. The chatbot helped current as well as prospective students to get answers to the questions asked about Temasek and also gave personalized course advice. In the 1st two weeks of 2020, ‘Ask’ TP’ responded to more than4,351 questions. She suggests everybody “deeply appreciate ‘people’ as they are the most critical asset in an organization, and a leader must develop a team”. Itumeleng Monale Executive Head of Enterprise Information Management Personal and Business Banking, Standard Bank of South Africa, South Africa. By deploying many analytical tools in her organization, she can uplift the revenue of the company. Through models of analytics relationships, bankers are experiencing a 40% revenue uplift when comparing to their peers. She sees AI as a tool through which business delivery can be accelerated, value could be added to human capital and relationships can build further. With this AI era, Research has postulated that corporate giants still have less percentage of women in the technical department. Facebook’s diversity report suggests that there are 22 % of women in the technical department and 15 per cent of women work in the AI research group. Similarly, Google’s diversity report suggests that only 10% women are working on  “machine intelligence”. There is a need to encourage women participation as there are many more women around the world, stepping out of the pre-existed sheathe and going beyond the walls to shape the future. Opening up the AI platform for all will fetch us more talented beings which can help us celebrate the use of AI in different fields and different ways. Reference:- https://www.ibm.com/watson/women-leaders-in-ai/2020-list https://advisory.kpmg.us/content/dam/advisory/en/pdfs/2020/technology-living-in-an-ai-world.pdf   About the author:- Kirti Kumar is a budding HR professional currently pursuing PGDM in HR and Marketing at New Delhi Institue of Management. She looks forward to opportunities that can hone her skills. She is agile in her attitude with versatility in her action


The artificial intelligence behind BBVA's virtual assistant, Blue

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Your financial health has improved since last month. Would you like to know by how much?" Blue, BBVA's new virtual assistant (VA), is the one doing the talking. Blue is integrated in the bank's mobile banking app in Spain (for Android and iOS) and can respond to over 100 user requests from the more than 800 features available in the application. Blue is pleasant, patient, and able to put itself in the shoes of others. It loves talking to humans and is always willing and ready to help customers. And it wants to learn lots of things in order to become even more insightful. These are just some of the personality traits that characterize BBVA's new voice assistant, which came to life out of a complex process that factored even the most minor details. The IT consulting firm, Gartner, defines virtual assistants as tools that help users perform a series of tasks that previously required human assistance. VAs use predictive models, natural language processing tools, recommendation engines, personalization systems based on artificial intelligence and advanced data analytics to do their job: assisting users and automating tasks. "VAs listen to and observe behaviors, build and maintain data models, and predict and recommend actions," the consulting firm explains. Blue's artificial intelligence capabilities are the result of a hybrid development: made up mostly of parts created by BBVA and others based on technologies that were readily available on the market and benefit from an advanced level of maturity, such as natural language processing (NLP) techniques. Specifically, the core of the system's artificial intelligence functionality is a 100 percent BBVA in-house development called Lenny. It is based on a set of cloud-based microservices and is responsible for orchestrating all the pieces that go into making Blue work. Thanks to this BBVA-developed'artificial brain', Blue is connected to the application functionalities that are powered by advanced data analytics. Examples include predicted banking transactions and financial health features, which the BBVA virtual assistant makes readily available to the customers by using natural, human-like dialog. "During the development of Blue, one of the most significant challenges was ensuring that we could cover the full range of functionality that BBVA, as a major player, offers in its app -- recognized as the most complete on the market -- in a voice and text-based virtual assistant," Eliseo Catalán, Head of BBVA Spain's Smart Assistants explains. Achieving this required that all the features in the app -- offered thanks to BBVA's digital capabilities -- were correctly set up and that each use case was thoroughly trained so that the user is given the appropriate response at every juncture of the customer journey. "We do all of this for the various platforms that might have different capabilities.


Major survey highlights Europeans' fears over AI – Government & civil service news

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Less than 20% of Europeans believe that current laws "efficiently regulate" artificial intelligence, and 56% have low trust in authorities to exert effective control over the technology, according to a new survey from the European Consumer Organisation (BEUC). The findings have important implications for the governance and design of AI-powered public services, emphasising the need to address citizens' fears over transparency, accountability, equity in decision-making, and the management of personal data. The BEUC surveyed 11,500 consumers in nine European countries: Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Sweden. It found that while a large majority of respondents feel that artificial intelligence (AI) can be useful, most don't trust the technology and feel that current regulations do not protect them from the harms it can cause. It also found that 66% of respondents from Belgium, Italy, Portugal and Spain agree that AI can be hazardous and should be banned by authorities.


Traveling tourist Part 1: Import WikiData to Neo4j with Neosemantics library

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After a short summer break, I have prepared a new blog series. In this first part, we will construct a knowledge graph of monuments located in Spain. As you might know, I have lately gained a lot of interest and respect for the wealth of knowledge that is available through the WikiData API. We will continue honing our SPARQL syntax knowledge and fetch the information regarding the monuments located in Spain from the WikiData API. I wasn't aware of this before, but scraping the RDF data available online and importing it into Neo4j is such a popular topic that Dr. Jesus Barrasa developed a Neosemantics library to help us with this process.


G-ray Switzerland Announces New CEO, Closes Successful Funding Round

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G-ray Switzerland, the medical imaging and industrial diagnosis start-up founded in 2014, has announced the appointment of Luis Pallares as Chief Executive Officer, as the company embarks on an accelerated growth drive and completes a successful funding round. Mr Pallares is focused on leading the transformation of G-ray's business development efforts following the company's development of a disruptive and patented state of the art technology to bring safer, cheaper and better vision into imaging for medical and industrial diagnosis. Mr Pallares joins G-ray with a wealth of entrepreneurial and start-up experience, having founded Spain's first streaming service, Addhoc Streaming, Spanish-speaking health related content site Vivir Mejor, and Spain's leading digital strategy firm, Nennisiwok. Most recently Mr Pallares' deep experience in technology development, artificial intelligence and digital advertising led him found Plyzer Technologies, a global leader of price comparison technology matched with business analytics and intelligence based on artificial intelligence. The appointment coincides with the news that G-ray has also raised a further CHF 2.6 millions, enabling it close out its successful Series A funding round at CHF 28 million.


AI may not predict the next pandemic, but big data and machine learning can fight this one

ZDNet

In April, at the height of the lockdown, computer-science professor Àlex Arenas predicted that a second wave of coronavirus was highly possible this summer in Spain. At the time, many scientists were still confident that high temperature and humidity would slow the impact and spread of the virus over the summer months, as happens with seasonal flu. Unfortunately, Arenas' predictions have turned out to be accurate. Madrid, the Basque country, Aragon, Catalonia, and other Spanish regions are currently dealing with a surge in COVID-19 cases, despite the use of masks, hand-washing and social distancing. Admittedly, August is not as bad as March for Spain, but it's still not a situation many foresaw.


Elephants vs trains: This is how AI helps ensure they don't collide

ZDNet

Michel André has good listening skills. He's used them to study the sounds of the marine environment, why sperm whales collide with ferries in the Canary Islands, and the acoustic problems that pink dolphins face in the Amazon river. Last year, he and his team from the Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics from Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC)-BarcelonaTech in Vilanova i la Geltrú were called in solve a problem in India. Records show that the Siliguri-Jalapaiguri railway line has the largest number of fatal collisions involving elephants in the country. Over the past 10 years, trains on this line have struck and killed more than 200 elephants.


How artificial intelligence gives ecommerce a boost

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According to a study conducted by EAE Business School at the beginning of Spain's lockdown, 30 percent of Spanish consumers indicated they would do more shopping over the Internet as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The data also reveals that during the first three months of the pandemic, 4 percent of these consumers were new to online shopping in general and 8.3 percent used online shopping for the first time to buy food products. How this change in consumer buying habits evolves will depend largely on the shopping experience that customers encounter as they emerge from lockdown. To improve the experience, brands will have to work on core strategies such as understanding their clientèle, identifying their preferences and needs, establishing relevant communication with them, and providing transaction facilities. This is where the techniques behind artificial intelligence can become important business allies. Artificial intelligence is the technology that will have the greatest impact on ecommerce in the years to come.