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Artificial Intelligence in France

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In the second of a series of blogs from our global offices, we provide a overview of key trends in artificial intelligence in France. What is France's strategy for Artificial Intelligence? The French president, Emmanuel Macron, announced in March 2018 his ambition for France to become a global leader of the artificial intelligence (AI) ecosystem. The first phase of the National Programme included an initial investment of €1.5 billion into the creation of a network of interdisciplinary institutes dedicated to artificial intelligence (the "3IA" institutes) and the financing of multiple AI projects overseen by Bpifrance. The second phase will provide for €2 billion of private and public funding to attract and train new talent.


AI and Oncology: IRT Saint Exupéry and IUCT-Oncopole collaborate to advance cancer research - Actu IA

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On May 17, two Toulouse-based institutes, the IRT Saint Exupéry and the IUCT-Oncopole, a European center of expertise in oncology, signed a partnership focused on artificial intelligence. The aim of this partnership is to pool cutting-edge skills around AI-based research projects designed to improve prevention, diagnosis and care in oncology, particularly by predicting therapeutic effectiveness. Two of these projects are already at an advanced stage. The Saint Exupéry Institute of Technological Research aims to accelerate scientific and technological research and transfer to the aeronautics and space industries for the development of reliable, robust, certifiable and sustainable innovative solutions. A private research foundation supported by the French government, the IRT's mission is to promote French technological research for the benefit of industry and to develop the ecosystem of the aeronautics, space and critical systems sectors by providing access to its research projects, technological platforms and expertise.


Google's DeepMind says it is close to achieving 'human-level' artificial intelligence

Daily Mail - Science & tech

DeepMind, a British company owned by Google, may be on the verge of achieving human-level artificial intelligence (AI). Nando de Freitas, a research scientist at DeepMind and machine learning professor at Oxford University, has said'the game is over' in regards to solving the hardest challenges in the race to achieve artificial general intelligence (AGI). AGI refers to a machine or program that has the ability to understand or learn any intellectual task that a human being can, and do so without training. According to De Freitas, the quest for scientists is now scaling up AI programs, such as with more data and computing power, to create an AGI. Earlier this week, DeepMind unveiled a new AI'agent' called Gato that can complete 604 different tasks'across a wide range of environments'. Gato uses a single neural network – a computing system with interconnected nodes that works like nerve cells in the human brain.


DeepMind's new AI system can perform over 600 tasks – TechCrunch

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The ultimate achievement to some in the AI industry is creating a system with artificial general intelligence (AGI), or the ability to understand and learn any task that a human can. Long relegated to the domain of science fiction, it's been suggested that AGI would bring about systems with the ability to reason, plan, learn, represent knowledge, and communicate in natural language. Not every expert is convinced that AGI is a realistic goal -- or even possible. Gato is what DeepMind describes as a "general-purpose" system, a system that can be taught to perform many different types of tasks. Researchers at DeepMind trained Gato to complete 604, to be exact, including captioning images, engaging in dialogue, stacking blocks with a real robot arm, and playing Atari games. Jack Hessel, a research scientist at the Allen Institute for AI, points out that a single AI system that can solve many tasks isn't new.


Covid lockdown made people more creative, study says

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Whether it was doing the kitting or learning to play a new instrument, the Covid lockdown made people more creative, a new study says. Researchers in Paris have surveyed hundreds of people about activities performed during the first lockdown at the start of the pandemic more than two years ago. Overall, based on almost 400 responses, the team found that people were forced to adapt to a new situation and'rethink our habits', which bred creativity. The researchers also acknowledged that pandemic and stay-at-home rules'restricted our liberties and triggered health or psychological difficulties', however. The new study has been led by researchers from the Frontlab at the Paris Brain Institute in France and published in Frontiers in Psychology.


The Prayer, the artificial intelligence that prays

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The Prayer, a unique project that combines technology, art and religion, rubbed shoulders with works by Kandinsky, Frida Kahlo and Duchamp at the Center Pompidou in Paris. After passing through the French capital, the robot who knows how to pray travels to other museums in the world. In any place, his ability to sing his prayers generated by an artificial intelligence system with a mechanical voice is surprising. I also read: Moravec's paradox: why robots are as smart as they are stupid "Sometimes funny things come up," he says with a laugh. Beyond the appearance of the little robot (a silicone nose and mouth that moves while she sings, with its mechanical entrails exposed) there is a algorithm that was trained with religious texts and prayers.


Volta Medical VX1 AI Software to be Featured at Heart Rhythm 2022

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MARSEILLE, France and PROVIDENCE, R.I., April 27, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Volta Medical, a pioneering medtech startup advancing novel artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms to treat cardiac arrhythmias, today announced it will participate at Heart Rhythm 2022, where Volta VX1 digital AI companion technology will be featured in several venues, including a poster session, podium presentation, Rhythm Theater program and the Volta exhibit booth. VX1 is a machine and deep learning-based algorithm designed to assist operators in the real-time manual annotation of 3D anatomical and electrical maps of the human atria during atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial tachycardia. It is the first FDA cleared AI-based tool in interventional cardiac electrophysiology (EP). On Friday, April 29, VX1 will be highlighted in two scientific sessions: session DH-202, "Machine Learning Applications for Arrhythmia Detection and Treatment" from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Volta's Rhythm Theater presentation, "Can AI Solve the Persistent AF Paradigm?," will be held Saturday, April 30 from 10:00-11:00 a.m.


French Presidency pushes for alignment with the new legislative framework in AI Act

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France is proposing several changes to the Artificial Intelligence (AI) Act to ensure better alignment with the new legislative framework, the EU's legislation that regulates market surveillance and conformity assessment procedures. The changes also relate to the designation of competent authorities and the high-risk AI database. The French Presidency, which leads the work in the EU Council, shared a new compromise text on Monday (25 April) that will be discussed with the representatives of the other member states at the telecom working party on Thursday. Notified bodies will play a crucial role in the enforcement of the AI Act, as they will be designated by EU countries to assess the conformity of the AI systems to EU rules before they are launched on the market. The new text refers explicitly to the EU regulation setting up the requirements for accreditation and market surveillance, and a reference that such bodies will have to respect confidentiality obligations has been added.


Soter Analytics raises £9m for workplace safety wearable

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Wearable tech company Soter Analytics has secured $12m (£9.2m) in its Series A round led by AV8 Ventures. Soter Analytics will use the funding to boost R&D of its wearable, artificial intelligence (AI) powered wearables designed to prevent injury in the workplace. Soter Analytics will also continue to grow its market share in the US, Europe and the UK. As part of this expansion, Soter plans to expand into France, Germany, Netherlands and Scandinavia. "Our bespoke technology provides an end-to-end safety solution through AI and machine learning, and this fundraise shows that our investors and partners have recognised the strength of our product," said Matthew Hart, founder and CEO, Soter Analytics.


Tech 24 - Artificial intelligence: A great help or simply great hype?

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This week's Tech 24 is a special edition from the south of France, where the World AI Cannes Festival is taking place. Almost every sector is abuzz with talk of AI, and investment in the technology is through the roof. But will it change the world completely? Or will it simply keep providing useful tools for specific circumstances? Peter O'Brien went to the festival to find out.