Hong Kong


Greek merger aimed at developing digital green solutions for shipping -

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A Greek maritime environmental engineering company has merged with a well known local shipping IT firm with the pair vowing to develop green digital solutions for the industry. Erma First, best known for its ballast water treatment systems, has bought out METIS Cyberspace Technology from the Germanos–led Olympia Group. Established in 2016, METIS is specialised in electronic engineering, IoT, cloud computing and artificial intelligence, offering a platform that enables shipping companies to acquire and analyse data to improve performance over a wide range of operational aspects. "With technology playing an increasingly critical role in every aspect of the industry, both companies recognize that they need to accelerate the development of green digital solutions to ensure they remain in the competitive vanguard," the companies said in a statement. Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world's oldest newspaper, Lloyd's List.


Greek merger aimed at developing digital green solutions for shipping -

#artificialintelligence

A Greek maritime environmental engineering company has merged with a well known local shipping IT firm with the pair vowing to develop green digital solutions for the industry. Erma First, best known for its ballast water treatment systems, has bought out METIS Cyberspace Technology from the Germanos–led Olympia Group. Established in 2016, METIS is specialised in electronic engineering, IoT, cloud computing and artificial intelligence, offering a platform that enables shipping companies to acquire and analyse data to improve performance over a wide range of operational aspects. "With technology playing an increasingly critical role in every aspect of the industry, both companies recognize that they need to accelerate the development of green digital solutions to ensure they remain in the competitive vanguard," the companies said in a statement. Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world's oldest newspaper, Lloyd's List.


What to Know About Blizzard, Hong Kong and the Controversy Over Politics in Esports

TIME - Tech

Though video game culture is seldom a quiet, peaceful place, the uproar over Blizzard Entertainment punishing a popular gamer for showing support for Hong Kong protesters has shaken the whole industry. Ng Wai Chung, a Hearthstone player from Hong Kong who goes by the name "Blitzchung," championed the pro-democracy protests in his hometown that have raged for the past five months during his appearance on a post-game stream. And Blizzard, the developer and publisher of Hearthstone, quickly responded with blanket punishments for everyone involved. It's the latest example of an American company caught between business interests in China and western-world freedom of speech. Outrage over Blizzard's reaction swiftly came from players, industry titans and politicians.


Move the Deal Episode 17: Using AI to Improve Talent Strategy with Talkpush's Max Armbruster

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This week's episode of Move the Deal features Max Armbruster, founder and CEO of Talkpush. Based in Hong Kong, Talkpush brings artificial intelligence to large-scale recruiting to make hiring and finding talent easier. With vast industry knowledge, Armbruster noticed in the field of automation selection and screening that the solutions available weren't user-friendly and required candidates to jump through too many hoops before qualifying for a job. Talkpush works with companies who hire a few thousand people a year, focusing on automating recruitment conversations. Candidates connect to recruiters through chatbots, using a conversational interface that allows recruiters to save time by eliminating those who aren't a good fit.


These clothes use outlandish designs to trick facial recognition software into thinking you're not a human

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Facial recognition technology is everywhere, and only becoming more pervasive. It's marketed as a security feature by companies like Apple and Google to prevent strangers from unlocking your iPhone or front door. It's also used by government agencies like police departments. More than half of adult Americans' faces are logged in police databases, according to a study by Georgetown researchers. Facial recognition technology is used by governments across the globe to identify and track dissidents, and has been deployed by police against Hong Kong protesters.


Artificial Intelligence Unlocking Advertising Potential

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We welcome the Founder & CEO of a German Ad-Tech startup firm ADLUUX in Hong Kong. Ivan Skoko will share his insights and tools for advertising agencies to leverage and optimise client advertising dollars. What Facebook and Google did to the online advertising will be be extended in public (also called out-of-home) advertising. Public advertising is expecting a mega paradigm shift and high growth, if the right AI strategies are adopted. More interesting is how technology (including AI) is driving the change where advertisers are able to captivate their audience via public screens and communicate to masses in an efficient way.


Emotional intelligence and AI could be a winning combination

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This article was first published in the April 2019 China edition of Accounting and Business magazine. Emotional intelligence is an increasingly important factor for success for finance professionals, particularly in the era of artificial intelligence (AI). The link between the two was explored at the ACCA Hong Kong CFO Summit, held late last year, at which delegates were asked to consider how finance leaders can seek to thrive in the digital age. 'Our strength in this increasingly digital age is being human, exercising judgment, scepticism and emotional maturity,' said Jane Cheng, head of ACCA Hong Kong. 'Emotional competencies are critical to becoming a trusted and capable professional accountant, someone who can combine analytical figures with emotional maturity.'


Communist China Utilized Artificial Intelligence with Facial Recognition Hunts Hong Kong Protesters For Capture, Rape & So Called Suicide

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Please understand the truth about Falun Gong. Please understand the truth about Falun Gong and the brutal persecution of Falun Gong in China. Please do not believe the Chinese Communist Party's lies. Falun Gong (Falun Dafa) teaches'Truthfulness, Compassion, Tolerance', it teaches us to be a GOOD person, and makes us HEALTHY! And it is embraced in 114 nations!


Hong Kong Is the Latest Tripwire for Tech Firms in China

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On Wednesday morning, Mark Kern sat down with his 12-year-old son to tell him the guild was breaking up. Kern had been involved with World of Warcraft from the very beginning--a game developer himself, he was the original team leader for the title when Blizzard Entertainment launched it in 2004--and was a steadfast player of WoW Classic, a throwback version of the game that launched in August. Over the weekend, an esports player for another Blizzard title, Hearthstone, had shouted a Hong Kong protest slogan on the game's official Taiwanese livestream; in response, Activision Blizzard suspended the player from high-level competitive play for a year and said it would not pay out his past winnings, claiming that he had violated rules barring acts that "offend[] a portion or group of the public." For Kern, who was born in Taiwan and spent time in Hong Kong, the studio he'd called home for nearly eight years had changed. He told his son that he had decided to cancel his WoW subscription, putting an end to their family tradition.


When It Comes to Payments, Its Risky to Use Your Face - Fintech Hong Kong

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In China, platforms and services like Alibaba's Alipay and Tencent's WeChat Pay have brought facial recognition payments to online and brick-and-mortar retail stores. But as biometrics and facial recognition technologies become mainstream, experts and regulators are concerned about the privacy and cybersecurity risks associated with these, according to a report by Abacus. Li Wei, director of the technology department of the People's Bank of China, said consumers should realize that when they are using these features, they are giving up privacy for convenience. Faces are very sensitive personal information, and it could have a critical impact on someone if it were leaked or stolen. While people can put their bank cards in their pockets, faces are out in the open all the time, Li said, adding that some companies have not considered these issues.