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Introduction to Artificial Intelligence.

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The starting point of modern information technology has as a starting point the year 1945 and the machine that defeated the Enigma code, the ENIAC, and the English mathematician and cryptanalyst, Alan Turing. "The original question, can machines think?" Forty years of development, starting from ENIAC, led to IBM's supercomputer Deep Blue. In 1985, Garry Kasparov became the world champion in chess beating 32 opponents, simultaneously. Deep Blue's predecessor, "Deep Thought", lost two times by the world chess champion Garry Kasparov in 1989.


Afraid of public speaking? This AI can help

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Greg Nichols covers robotics, AI, and AR/VR for ZDNet. A full-time journalist and author, he writes about tech, travel, crime, and the economy for global media outlets and reports from across the U. Seinfeld points out with characteristic deadpan that most funeral attendees would rather be in the casket than give the eulogy. Was there a hint of the familiar in that Seinfeld joke? The National Institute of Mental Health reports that public speaking anxiety affects 73% of people. Can AI help bring some comfort and ease in front of a crowd?


Afraid of public speaking? This AI can help

ZDNet

Seinfeld points out with characteristic deadpan that most funeral attendees would rather be in the casket than give the eulogy. Was there a hint of the familiar in that Seinfeld joke? The National Institute of Mental Health reports that public speaking anxiety affects 73% of people. Can AI help bring some comfort and ease in front of a crowd? That's the premise of Yoodli, a free platform to help people improve their speaking skills without the pressure of an audience.


How did AI beat eight world champions at bridge?

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On March 16, French AI startup NukkAI claimed on Twitter that in the following week, they would host a competition where the research firm would beat eight Bridge world champions. Bridge, unlike Chess or Go, is a more complicated game that involves cooperation and even covert signalling between players. It isn't considered a game in which AI would improve upon a human's performance considerably. In Bridge, opponents aren't aware of the cards that each of them holds, while, in Chess, opponents can make their strategies after observing the other's move. So much so that co-founder of Microsoft and avid bridge player Bill Gates once said that Bridge would be one of the last games where the computer couldn't better the human.


A Hybrid AI Just Beat Eight World Champions at Bridge--and Explained How It Did It

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Champion bridge player Sharon Osberg once wrote, "Playing bridge is like running a business. While it's little surprise chess fell to number-crunching supercomputers long ago, you'd expect humans to maintain a more unassailable advantage in bridge, a game of incomplete information, cooperation, and sly communication. Over millennia, our brains have evolved to read subtle facial queues and body language. We've assembled sprawling societies dependent on the competition and cooperation of millions. Surely such skills are beyond the reach of machines? In recent years, the most advanced AI has begun encroaching on some of our most proudly held territory; the ability to navigate an uncertain world where information is limited, the game is infinitely nuanced, and no one succeeds alone. Last week, French startup NukkAI took another step when its NooK bridge-playing AI outplayed eight bridge world champions in a competition held in Paris. The game was simplified, and NooK didn't exactly go ...


Artificial intelligence beats eight world champions at bridge

The Guardian

An artificial intelligence has beaten eight world champions at bridge, a game in which human supremacy has resisted the march of the machines until now. The victory represents a new milestone for AI because in bridge players work with incomplete information and must react to the behaviour of several other players โ€“ a scenario far closer to human decision-making. In contrast, chess and Go โ€“ in both of which AIs have already beaten human champions โ€“ a player has a single opponent at a time and both are in possession of all the information. "What we've seen represents a fundamentally important advance in the state of artificial intelligence systems," said Stephen Muggleton, a professor of machine learning at Imperial College London. French startup NukkAI announced the news of its AI's victory on Friday, at the end of a two-day tournament in Paris.


The history of machine learning algorithms

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Machine learning algorithms can perform exponential tasks today--from mastering board games and identifying faces to automating daily tasks and making predictive decisions--this decade has brought forward countless algorithmic breakthroughs and several controversies. But one would find it a challenge to believe this development started only less than a century ago with Walter Pitts and Warren McCulloch. Analytics India Magazine takes you through a historical story of machine learning algorithms. Machine learning was ideated first in 1943 by logician Walter Pitts and neuroscientist Warren McCulloch, who published a mathematical paper mapping the decision-making process in human cognition and neural networks. Later, mathematician and computer scientist Alan Turing introduced the Turing test in 1950.


DeepMind's David Silver on games, beauty, and AI's potential to avert human-made disasters - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

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David Silver thinks games are the key to creativity. After competing in national Scrabble competitions as a kid, he went on to study at Cambridge and co-found a video game company. Later, after earning his PhD in artificial intelligence, he led the DeepMind team that developed AlphaGo--the first program to beat a world champion at the ancient Chinese game of go. But he isn't driven by competitiveness. That's because for Silver, now a principal research scientist at DeepMind and computer science professor at University College London, games are playgrounds in which to understand how minds--human and artificial--learn on their own to achieve goals. Silver's programs use deep neural networks--machine learning algorithms inspired by the brain's structure and function--to achieve results that resemble human intuition and creativity.


AI can't steal your job if you work alongside it -- here's how

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Whether it's athletes on a sporting field or celebrities in the jungle, nothing holds our attention like the drama of vying for a single prize. And when it comes to the evolution of artificial intelligence (AI), some of the most captivating moments have also been delivered in nailbiting finishes. In 1997, IBM's Deep Blue chess computer was pitted against grandmaster and reigning world champion Garry Kasparov, having lost to him the previous year. But this time, the AI won. The popular Chinese game Go was next, in 2016, and again there was a collective intake of breath when Google's AI was victorious.


What's the Secret To Making Sure Artificial Intelligence Doesn't Steal Your Job?

#artificialintelligence

Whether it's athletes on a sporting field or celebrities in the jungle, nothing holds our attention like the drama of vying for a single prize. And when it comes to the evolution of artificial intelligence (AI), some of the most captivating moments have also been delivered in nailbiting finishes. In 1997, IBM's Deep Blue chess computer was pitted against grandmaster and reigning world champion Garry Kasparov, having lost to him the previous year. But this time, the AI won. The popular Chinese game Go was next, in 2016, and again there was a collective intake of breath when Google's AI was victorious.