upstream oil & gas


AI could fix costly downtime

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Unplanned outages are on the rise globally from both equipment failures and damages. Smaller operators do not have the excess capital to conduct the same level of planned outages. As traditional methods of predicting equipment failure can be unreliable in a dynamic operating environment, they can be hesitant to sanction significant shutdown work unless it is absolutely necessary. Thus, they are forced to ride out operational uncertainty and have unfortunately seen unplanned outages increase. Unplanned outages have severe negative cost and production consequences for the operator.


Oil and Gas Companies Turn to AI to Cut Costs

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While Aker BP got the help it needed from a small Austin, Texas-based AI software firm, SparkCognition, some bigger oil-and-gas companies are working with giants in the tech industry. Exxon Mobil Corp. XOM 0.35% in February started a partnership with Microsoft Corp. MSFT 1.45% to deploy AI programs to optimize its operations in the Permian, or West Texas Basin. The oil giant also recently installed an AI program to gain insights from data coming from millions of sensors that monitor its global refineries. Total SA, TOT 0.75% meanwhile, is linking up with Google Inc. to better interpret seismic data, and is set to increase its investment in AI to squeeze more hydrocarbons from existing assets. Royal Dutch Shell RDS.B -0.34% PLC, for its part, has tested an AI program that monitors sensors on equipment at its Rotterdam refinery, the largest in Europe, to help figure out where to better direct maintenance staff and dollars.


Machine Learning Applications

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Last year at the Ignition Community conference, Inductive Automation's Kevin McClusky (co-director of sales engineering) and Kathy Applebaum (senior software engineer) explored the various ways in which machine learning can be applied in industry. In this presentation, they delved deep into the types of machine learning most applicable to industry and the algorithms behind them. You can read more about this 2018 presentation in the article "How to Apply Industrial Machine Learning," which was based on that presentation. At this year's event, McClusky and Applebaum came together again to highlight the integration of more machine learning capabilities into Ignition over the past year, as well as to showcase four industrial use cases of machine learning being explored by Ignition users. Newly available machine learning capabilities in Ignition enable users to take advantage of the Apache Math 3 library previously added to Ignition 7.9.10 just prior to the release of Ignition 8.


The Incredible Ways Shell Uses Artificial Intelligence To Help Transform The Oil And Gas Giant

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Royal Dutch Shell is heavily investing in research and development of artificial intelligence (AI), which it hopes will provide solutions to some of its most pressing challenges. From meeting the demands of a transitioning energy market, urgently in need of cleaner and more efficient power, to improving safety on the forecourts of its service stations, AI is at the top of the agenda. I have been working with Shell over the past months to help create a data strategy, which gave me a thorough insight into Shell's AI priorities and initiatives. Current initiatives include deploying reinforcement learning in its exploration and drilling program, to reduce the cost of extracting the gas that still drives a significant proportion of its revenues. Elsewhere across its global business, Shell is rolling out AI at its public electric car charging stations, to manage the shifting demand for power throughout a day.


Big Tech's eco-pledges aren't slowing its pursuit of Big Oil

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Employee activism and outside pressure have pushed big tech companies like Amazon, Microsoft and Google into promising to slash their carbon emissions. When Microsoft held an all-staff meeting in September, an employee asked CEO Satya Nadella if it was ethical for the company to be selling its cloud computing services to fossil fuel companies, according to two other Microsoft employees who described the exchange on condition they not be named. Such partnerships, the worker told Nadella, were accelerating the oil companies' greenhouse gas emissions. Microsoft and other tech giants have been competing with one another to strike lucrative partnerships with ExxonMobil, Chevron, Shell, BP and other energy firms, in many cases supplying them not just with remote data storage but also artificial intelligence tools for pinpointing better drilling spots or speeding up refinery production. The oil and gas industry is spending roughly $20 billion each year on cloud services, which accounts for about 10% of the total cloud market, according to Vivek Chidambaram, a managing director of Accenture's energy consultancy.


9 Examples for Customer Use Cases

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There different approaches and attempts to decentralize or distribute various aspects of computing. In most cases, it is tried to distribute some customer use cases, whereas the underlying algorithms are so well known that an individual result validation can be developed. However, if a distributed computing network only focuses on supported use cases or requires customers to also supply a validation method, the usability is heavily limited for customers. HiveNet on the contrary focuses on mass adoption with flexible use cases. Customers will be able to request the computation of a wide set of tasks, which they can define, without the need of additionally supplying validation methods.


This Robot Ship Aims to Cross the Atlantic Ocean… Without Humans

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The voyage is expected to take about 35 days and could prove that ships never really needed humans in the first place. They call Maxlimer a robot ship. But a more apt name could also be a ghost ship. Because if you came across it during one of its seafaring journeys, no humans would be onboard. SEE ALSO: Is This New Submarine the World's Best Aquatic War Machine?


AI brings new energy to oil and gas

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CALGARY, Alberta--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Alberta Machine Intelligence Institute (Amii) and Imperial have announced a two-year agreement to collaborate on the development of Imperial's in-house machine learning capabilities, which will enable a range of applied artificial intelligence (AI) projects. Through these projects, Imperial will work to develop more effective ways to recover oil and gas resources, reduce environmental impacts and improve the safety of its workforce. "At Imperial, we are taking action to be a leader in advancing digital and AI technology across the value chain," said John Whelan, Imperial's senior vice-president, upstream. "Amii is not only a leader in the AI space globally, but based locally in Alberta. We believe the institute is a perfect partner to help us showcase Alberta's leadership in technology and digital solutions for responsibly-produced oil and gas."


Big Tech's eco-pledges aren't slowing its pursuit of Big Oil

The Japan Times

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND – Employee activism and outside pressure have pushed big tech companies like Amazon, Microsoft and Google to make promises to slash their carbon emissions. When Microsoft held an all-staff meeting in September, an employee asked CEO Satya Nadella if it was ethical for the company to be selling its cloud computing services to fossil fuel companies, according to two other Microsoft employees who described the exchange on condition they not be named. Such partnerships, the worker told Nadella, were accelerating the oil companies' greenhouse gas emissions. Microsoft and other tech giants have been competing with one another to strike lucrative partnerships with ExxonMobil, Chevron, Shell, BP and other energy firms, in many cases supplying them not just with remote data storage but also artificial intelligence tools for pinpointing better drilling spots or speeding up refinery production. The oil and gas industry is spending roughly $20 billion each year on cloud services, which accounts for about 10 percent of the total cloud market, according to Vivek Chidambaram, a managing director of Accenture's energy consultancy.


Big Tech's eco-pledges aren't slowing its pursuit of Big Oil

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In this May 6, 2019 file photo, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella delivers the keynote address at Build, the company's annual conference for software developers in Seattle. Microsoft and other tech giants have been competing to strike lucrative partnerships with ExxonMobil, Chevron, Shell, BP and other energy firms. One employee stood up to ask Microsoft CEO Nadella about the ethics of the company's oil and gas contracts at an all-staff meeting in Sept. 2019, and Nadella defended the partnerships. Employee activism and outside pressure have pushed big tech companies like Amazon, Microsoft and Google promising to slash their carbon emissions. When Microsoft held an all-staff meeting in September, an employee asked CEO Satya Nadella if it was ethical for the company to be selling its cloud computing services to fossil fuel companies, according to two other Microsoft employees who described the exchange on condition they not be named.