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The case for placing AI at the heart of digitally robust financial regulation

#artificialintelligence

"Data is the new oil." Originally coined in 2006 by the British mathematician Clive Humby, this phrase is arguably more apt today than it was then, as smartphones rival automobiles for relevance and the technology giants know more about us than we would like to admit. Just as it does for the financial services industry, the hyper-digitization of the economy presents both opportunity and potential peril for financial regulators. On the upside, reams of information are newly within their reach, filled with signals about financial system risks that regulators spend their days trying to understand. The explosion of data sheds light on global money movement, economic trends, customer onboarding decisions, quality of loan underwriting, noncompliance with regulations, financial institutions' efforts to reach the underserved, and much more. Importantly, it also contains the answers to regulators' questions about the risks of new technology itself. Digitization of finance generates novel kinds of hazards and accelerates their development. Problems can flare up between scheduled regulatory examinations and can accumulate imperceptibly beneath the surface of information reflected in traditional reports. Thanks to digitization, regulators today have a chance to gather and analyze much more data and to see much of it in something close to real time. The potential for peril arises from the concern that the regulators' current technology framework lacks the capacity to synthesize the data. The irony is that this flood of information is too much for them to handle.


NASA just showed us why its Mars lander will soon run out of power

Mashable

After detecting over 1,300 Martian quakes, NASA's InSight lander will soon run out of power. A thick layer of red dust has coated the landmark robot's solar panels, depriving the geologic sleuth of the power it needs to continue investigating Mars' interior. The space agency expects to shut down InSight's science mission, notably the use of its temblor-detecting seismometer, over the summer. By year's end, InSight's successful, nearly four-year mission will likely end. "InSight is probably coming to the end of its scientific life pretty soon," Bruce Banerdt, InSight's principal investigator at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said at a press briefing on May 17. A GIF NASA shared this week gives a vivid look at why InSight's power is diminishing.


Pentagon names new chief of responsible artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The Pentagon has tapped artificial intelligence ethics and research expert Diane Staheli to lead the Responsible AI (RAI) Division of its new Chief Digital and AI Office (CDAO), FedScoop confirmed on Tuesday. In this role, Staheli will help steer the Defense Department's development and application of policies, practices, standards and metrics for buying and building AI that is trustworthy and accountable. She enters the position nearly nine months after DOD's first AI ethics lead exited the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center (JAIC), and in the midst of a broad restructuring of the Pentagon's main AI-associated components under the CDAO. "[Staheli] has significant experience in military-oriented research and development environments, and is a contributing member of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence AI Assurance working group," Sarah Flaherty, CDAO's public affairs officer, told FedScoop. Advanced computer-driven systems use AI to perform tasks that generally require some human intelligence.


The Navy Must Learn to Hide from Algorithms

#artificialintelligence

Without radar or sonar, the Allies struggled to locate and attack the submarines in the stormy and foggy North Atlantic. To confuse and deceive the enemy, the Allies painted their ships to camouflage them on the ocean. These paint schemes, often called dazzle camouflage, were designed not only to conceal a ship's presence, but also to complicate the submarine's fire-control solution by making it more difficult to determine the aspect of the ship. Paint schemes remained in use through World War II and still find occasional use today. In renewed great power competition, the paint scheme deception tactic should not be retired but, instead, scaled for the 21st century.


An AI power play: Fueling the next wave of innovation in the energy sector

#artificialintelligence

Tatum, Texas might not seem like the most obvious place for a revolution in artificial intelligence (AI), but in October of 2020, that's exactly what happened. That was when Wayne Brown, the operations manager at the Vistra-owned Martin Lake Power Plant, built and deployed a heat rate optimizer (HRO). Vistra Corp. is the largest competitive power producer in the United States and operates power plants in 12 states with a capacity of more than 39,000 megawatts of electricity--enough to power nearly 20 million homes. Vistra has committed to reducing emissions by 60 percent by 2030 (against a 2010 baseline) and achieving net-zero emissions by 2050. To achieve its goals, the business is increasing efficiency in all its power plants and transforming its generation fleet by retiring coal plants and investing in solar- and battery-energy storage, which includes the world's largest grid-scale battery energy-storage facility.


All the buzz about NASA's new fleet of space bees

#artificialintelligence

Robot bees are no replacement for our vital pollinators here on Earth. Up on the International Space Station, however, robots bearing the bee name could help spacefaring humans save precious time. On Friday, NASA astronaut Anne McClain took one of the trio of Astrobees out for a spin. Bumble and its companion Honey both arrived on the ISS a month ago, and are currently going through a series of checks. Bumble passed the first hurdle when McClain manually flew it around the Japanese Experiment Module.



Is artificial intelligence the next tool to fight wildfires?

#artificialintelligence

With wildfires becoming bigger and more destructive as the western part of the United States dries out and heats up, agencies and officials tasked with preventing and battling the blazes could soon have a new tool to add to their arsenal of prescribed burns, pick axes, chainsaws and aircraft. The high-tech help could come from an area not normally associated with fighting wildfires: artificial intelligence (AI). Lockheed Martin Space, based in Jefferson County, is tapping decades of experience in managing satellites, exploring space and providing information to the US military to offer more accurate data quicker to ground crews. It is talking to the US Forest Service, university researchers, and a Colorado state agency about how their technology could help. By generating more timely information about on-the-ground conditions and running computer programs to process massive amounts of data, Lockheed Martin representatives say they can map fire perimeters in minutes rather than the hours it can take now.


Steve Blank Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning– Explained

#artificialintelligence

Hundreds of billions in public and private capital is being invested in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning companies. The number of patents filed in 2021 is more than 30 times higher than in 2015 as companies and countries across the world have realized that AI and Machine Learning will be a major disruptor and potentially change the balance of military power. Until recently, the hype exceeded reality. Today, however, advances in AI in several important areas (here, here, here, here and here) equal and even surpass human capabilities. If you haven't paid attention, now's the time. Artificial Intelligence and the Department of Defense (DoD) The Department of Defense has thought that Artificial Intelligence is such a foundational set of technologies that they started a dedicated organization- the JAIC – to enable and implement artificial intelligence across the Department. They provide the infrastructure, tools, and technical expertise for DoD users to successfully build and deploy their AI-accelerated projects. Some specific defense related AI applications are listed later in this document. We're in the Middle of a Revolution Imagine it's 1950, and you're a visitor who traveled back in time from today. Your job is to explain the impact computers will have on business, defense and society to people who are using manual calculators and slide rules. You succeed in convincing one company and a government to adopt computers and learn to code much faster than their competitors /adversaries. And they figure out how they could digitally enable their business – supply chain, customer interactions, etc. Think about the competitive edge they'd have by today in business or as a nation. That's where we are today with Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. These technologies will transform businesses and government agencies.


Gen. Milley warns West Point graduates of 'increasing' risk of global war, 'robotic tanks'

FOX News

Gen. Mark Milley tells graduates of the US Military Academy to prepare West Point military academy graduates to prepare for increasingly dangerous world. Gen. Mark Milley told cadets graduating from U.S. Military Academy West Point Saturday to be prepared for increasing risk of global conflict and a host of new weapons technologies in their careers. "The world you are being commissioned into has the potential for a significant international conflict between great powers. And that potential is increasing, not decreasing," Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the cadets at the 2022 commencement ceremony in West Point, New York. "And right now, at this very moment, a fundamental change is happening in the very character of war. We are facing right now two global powers, China and Russia, each with significant military capabilities, and both who fully intend to change the current rules based order," Milley said.