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Scientific fact-checking using AI language models: COVID-19 research and beyond

ZDNet

If you think fact-checking is hard, which it is, then what would you say about verifying scientific claims, on COVID-19 no less? From cancelled conferences to disrupted supply chains, not a corner of the global economy is immune to the spread of COVID-19. Fact or Fiction: Verifying Scientific Claims is the title of a research paper published on pre-print server Arxiv by a team of researchers from the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2), with data and code available on GitHub. ZDNet connected with David Wadden, lead author of the paper and a visiting researcher at AI2, to discuss the rationale, details, and directions for this work. Although the authors of the paper refer to their work as scientific fact-checking, we believe it's important to clarify semantics before going any further.


How to Prevent Overfitting in Machine Learning Models

#artificialintelligence

Very deep neural networks with a huge number of parameters are very robust machine learning systems. But, in this type of massive networks, overfitting is a common serious problem. Learning how to deal with overfitting is essential to mastering machine learning. The fundamental issue in machine learning is the tension between optimization and generalization. Optimization refers to the process of adjusting a model to get the best performance possible on the training data (the learning in machine learning), whereas generalization refers to how well the trained model performs on the data that it has never seen before (test set).


Here's how to check in on your AI system, as COVID-19 plays havoc

#artificialintelligence

The machine learning approach works well when these new cases are similar to the examples in the training data. The ability of machine learning algorithms to identify subtle patterns in the training data can allow it to make a faster and possibly better predictions than a human. However, if the new cases are radically different from the training data, and especially if we are playing by a whole new rulebook, then the patterns in the training data will no longer be a useful basis for prediction. Some algorithms are designed to continuously add new training data and therefore update the algorithm, but with large changes this gradual updating will not be sufficient. To learn completely new rules, machine learning algorithms need large amounts of new data.


Towards A More Transparent AI

#artificialintelligence

One cornerstone of making AI work is machine learning - the ability for machines to learn from experience and data, and improve over time as they learn. In fact, it's been the explosion in research and application of machine learning that's made AI the recent hot bed of interest, investment, and application that it is today. Fundamentally, machine learning is all about giving machines lots of data to learn from, and using sophisticated algorithms that can generalize from that learning for data that the machine has never seen before. In this manner, the machine learning algorithm is the recipe that teaches the machine how to learn, and the machine learning model is the output of that learning that can then generalize to new data. Regardless of the algorithm used to create the machine learning model, there is one fundamental truth: the machine learning model is only as good as its data. In many cases, these bad models are easy to spot since they perform poorly.


Towards A More Transparent AI

#artificialintelligence

One cornerstone of making AI work is machine learning - the ability for machines to learn from experience and data, and improve over time as they learn. In fact, it's been the explosion in research and application of machine learning that's made AI the hot bed of interest, investment, and application that it is today. Fundamentally, machine learning is all about giving machines lots of data to learn from, and using sophisticated algorithms that can generalize from that learning to data that the machine has never seen before. In this manner, the machine learning algorithm is the recipe that teaches the machine how to learn, and the machine learning model is the output of that learning that can then generalize to new data. Regardless of the algorithm used to create the machine learning model, there is one fundamental truth: the machine learning model is only as good as its data. In many cases, these bad models are easy to spot since they perform poorly.


Seeing Through Walls

Communications of the ACM

Machine vision coupled with artificial intelligence (AI) has made great strides toward letting computers understand images. Thanks to deep learning, which processes information in a way analogous to the human brain, machine vision is doing everything from keeping self-driving cars on the right track to improving cancer diagnosis by examining biopsy slides or x-ray images. Now some researchers are going beyond what the human eye or a camera lens can see, using machine learning to watch what people are doing on the other side of a wall. The technique relies on low-power radio frequency (RF) signals, which reflect off living tissue and metal but pass easily through wooden or plaster interior walls. AI can decipher those signals, not only to detect the presence of people, but also to see how they are moving, and even to predict the activity they are engaged in, from talking on a phone to brushing their teeth.


An easy guide to choose the right Machine Learning algorithm - KDnuggets

#artificialintelligence

Well, there is no straightforward and sure-shot answer to this question. The answer depends on many factors like the problem statement and the kind of output you want, type and size of the data, the available computational time, number of features, and observations in the data, to name a few. Here are some important considerations while choosing an algorithm. It is usually recommended to gather a good amount of data to get reliable predictions. However, many a time, the availability of data is a constraint.


COVID-19 Is Changing Our Behavior – and Messing Up Machine Learning Models

#artificialintelligence

When the U.S. began locking down to slow the spread of the coronavirus, Amazon, grocery stores, and wholesale stores like Costco saw an enormous uptick in consumers wanting to buy a few select items. On Amazon, during the week of April 12th to 18th, the top ten search queries were face masks and N95 masks, hand sanitizer, paper products like paper towels and toilet paper, and sanitizing solutions like Lysol spray and Clorox wipes. So many people bought face masks that April's new #1 selling product on Amazon was "Face Mask, Pack of 50". This trend occurred across every single consumer- and business-facing industry and vertical. Consumers started behaving erratically literally overnight, and they haven't stopped behaving abnormally, creating a massive problem for companies who employ artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning models.


Basics of machine learning algorithm every product manager should know

#artificialintelligence

Data has become the new currency now and when the new norm of the life will be push us more towards adoption of digital products, data will play crucial role in determining consumer behaviour and personalising the digital solution. The demand for the digital products will grow day by day and the responsibility of a product manager will also increase, which will push them to learn new skills and technology. I will keep on sharing my experience and learning with fellow product professionals to solve consumers problem in a better way. Let us start our journey with a brief understanding of machine learning. Machine learning is an application of artificial intelligence (AI) that provides systems the ability to automatically learn and improve from experience.


How to implement the Feedforward Neural Network in Python?

#artificialintelligence

In this post, we will see how to implement the feedforward neural network from scratch in python. In this post, we will see how to implement the Feedforward Neural Network from scratch in Python. Feedforward neural networks are also known as Multi-layered Network of Neurons (MLN). These network of models are called feedforward because the information only travels forward in the neural network, through the input nodes then through the hidden layers (single or many layers) and finally through the output nodes. Traditional models such as McCulloch Pitts, Perceptron and Sigmoid neuron models capacity is limited to linear functions.