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It's in your eyes! People with large pupils are more INTELLIGENT, study finds

Daily Mail - Science & tech

People who have larger pupils in their eyes are more intelligent than those with smaller pupils, according to a new study. Volunteers sat reasoning, attention and memory tests so the Georgia Institute of Technology team could investigate the link between pupil size and intelligence. They found that as well as being linked to arousal and exhaustion, pupil dilation can be used to understand the individual differences in intelligence, discovering that the larger the pupils, the higher the intelligence. Differences in the baseline pupil size between those scoring highest and those scoring lowest on intelligence tests could be seen with the unaided eye. The team say this could be due to people with larger pupils having better results regulation of brain activity in a region linked to intelligence and memory.


Women rate age, income and personality highly when it comes to sexual attraction

Daily Mail - Science & tech

It's a question that has baffled most men for years โ€“ what do women want? Now, a new survey has revealed exactly what females rate the highest when it comes to sexual attraction, as well as what men's priorities are. The findings suggest that while women rate age, income and personality highly, men are more focused on looks. The researchers suggest that these differences may occur as a result of the fact that women's window for reproduction is more limited than men's, so they'can't risk choosing poorly.' In the study, researchers from Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane surveyed 7,325 users of dating websites about what they look for in a potential partner.


Teens spend 12% less time looking at the face of the person they are speaking to than adults

Daily Mail - Science & tech

If you have teenagers at home, it's likely you often feel like you're speaking to a brick wall. Now, a study has confirmed that teenagers really do ignore you, spending less time looking at your face when you're speaking to them than another adult would. A team led by the University of Kent recorded three groups of volunteers, aged 10-19, 20-40 and 60-80 in real-world social interaction situations. The situations involved them having a face-to-face conversation and navigating an environment, with eye-tracking glasses used to monitor their interactions. The findings revealed that adolescents pay less attention to social cues in real-world interactions than adults.


Women's pain 'perceived as less intense' than men's pain

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Pain felt by women is perceived as less intense by observers as pain felt by men, a new study reveals. US scientists found that when male and female patients experienced the same amount of pain, observers viewed female patients' pain as milder and more likely to benefit from psychotherapy than medication. Both male and female observers were found to be guilty of this'gender bias', which could lead to disparities in treatments and women in pain not getting the medication they need. According to the experts, the bias is due to an age-old stereotype that men are more'stoic' that women โ€“ and so their pain is likely to be more serious. University of Miami researchers found that when male and female patients expressed the same amount of pain, observers viewed female patients' pain as less intense and more likely to benefit from psychotherapy versus medication as compared to men's pain, exposing a significant patient gender bias that could lead to disparities in treatments (stock image) Health professionals use different terms for different types of pain.


Pets: Cats are 'too socially inept' to stand with their owners, study warns

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Unlike their canine counterparts, cats may be'too socially inept' to stand with their owners against someone treating their human poorly, a study has warned. Researchers from Japan found that our feline friends will as gladly take food from someone who hinders their owner as one who helps them or acts neutrally. However, this might not be a simple case of treachery, the team said -- instead, it is possible that cats cannot read human social interactions the same way dogs can. Domestic cats evolved from solitary hunters, meaning that they likely lacked the kind of original social skills dogs were able to build on during domestication. Unlike their canine counterparts, cats may be'too socially inept' to stand with their owners against someone treating their human poorly, a study has warned (stock image) In the study, animal behaviour scientist Hitomi Chijiiwa of Kyoto University and colleagues had cat owners try -- unsuccessfully -- to open a transparent container to take out an object while their cats watched.


People contemplating the end of a relationship start saying 'I' and 'we' more

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Break-ups are something that many people dread - especially when you don't see them coming. Now, a new study has revealed a key way to tell if your partner is thinking of breaking up with you, based on their language. The study found that people contemplating the end of a relationship change their launguage and start saying'I' and'we' more. According to the experts, the use of the word'I' is correlated with depression and sadness, and is a key sign that someone is carrying a heavy cognitive load. The researchers hope the findings will provide people with a key insight into how loved ones may respond over time to the end of a romantic relationship.


Singletons who use dating apps to have sex are more likely to have an STI and not use protection

Daily Mail - Science & tech

People using dating apps to'hook up' are more likely to have a sexually transmitted infection and not use protection than those who meet in other ways, a study finds. The increasing popularity of dating apps means that finding a new sexual partner is as easy as a few swipes on a screen โ€“ but researchers found this comes with risks. A team from the Public Health Agency of Sweden surveyed more than 14,500 men and women aged 16 to 84 about the sexual behaviour, online dating and health. They didn't ask which apps or services people used, but found those turning to digital dating tools were more likely to have an STI and less likely to use a condom. People using dating apps to'hook up' are more likely to have a sexually transmitted infection and not use protection than those who meet in other ways, study finds.


AI can diagnose Osteoarthritis by analysing cartilage texture 3 years before it starts wearing away

Daily Mail - Science & tech

AI can be used to to determine whether someone will develop Osteoarthritis by analysing cartilage texture three years before it starts wearing away, study found. Researchers from John Hopkins Hospital and others ran an artificial intelligence model over scans of 86 people with no discernible symptoms of osteoarthritis. The machine learning model was about to detect the beginning stages of the condition with 78 per cent accuracy up to three years before symptom onset. In the UK about 8.5 million people have Osteoarthritis, a condition which causes joints to become painful and stiff - particularly in people over the age of 65. If the condition can be detected early a combination of weight loss and exercise could make Osteoarthritis less severe when it happens - or even delay onset.


Scopio -- The Largest Library of Authentic Photos of Protest Art Powered by Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

As protests over racial inequality grow, companies are finding innovative ways to capture and even propagate the historic movement. Among them is Scopio -- the largest library of authentic photos powered by Artificial Intelligence. The company was born from the resurgence of protest art, a term used to describe creative works that concern or are produced by activists and social movements. In the age of social media, this form of protest has bloomed into a key mechanism for amplifying and documenting movements. It is estimated that 1.8 billion photos are being shared on social media every day.


'Sentient' homes and 'intelligent' food could feature in the lives of our children 30 years from now

Daily Mail - Science & tech

It is never easy to predict what society and technology will look like in the coming decades, but one futurist used the imaginations of children to come up with ideas. Futurist Brian David Johnson spoke to kids aged 8-13 as part of a study into their vision of life in the 2050s for the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). 'The current generation of young minds is nothing like we've seen before', Johnson explained, saying they were born and grew up constantly connected. Every child he spoke to was optimistic about the future, with many showing'jump-out-of-their-seat' levels of excitement about'what is to come' as they reach adulthood. He used the conversations he had with the children and their parents to formulate predictions about the future of smart homes, food and personal virtual assistants. Futurist Brian David Johnson spoke to children aged 8-13 as part of a study into their vision of life in the 2050s for the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).