speech recognition


Google is working on software that could eventually replace Android

Mashable

Google is already working on an operating system that may replace Android in the next five years. The tech giant has reportedly been tinkering on the OS, codenamed "Fuchsia," for over two years and now has more than 100 engineers working on the project, according to Bloomberg. SEE ALSO: Google's experimental operating system, Fuchsia, is now available for the Pixelbook Unlike Android, which was designed as an operating system primarily for smartphones and devices with touchscreens, Fuchsia is said to put voice-controls and AI front and center. "It's being designed to better accommodate voice interactions and frequent security updates and to look the same across a range of devices, from laptops to tiny internet-connected sensors," Bloomberg reports. Engineers currently working the project are said to be working towards getting Fuchsia running on voice-controlled speakers "within three years, then move on to larger machines such as laptops."


Developing Voice Assistants Will Take A Village – Tolani Adekoya – Medium

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There's a good old saying that says'it takes a village to raise a child' and in the world of tech I believe that child is currently voice assistants. Pretty much most of the new technologies are incorporating voice features and there's a big reason for that. Aside from the fact that it makes interaction with systems easier, voice assistants are not yet advanced and their development relies on analysing vast amounts of voice data. This is why open source projects like the Mozilla Common Voice project exist where users can donate their voice to research and it is also why tech giants like Google and Amazon are pushing out products like Alexa and Google Home. So what exactly do tech companies want to do with our voices?


Using the Speech-to-Text API with C#

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In order to make requests to the Speech-to-Text API, you need to use a Service Account. A Service Account belongs to your project and it is used by the Google Client C# library to make Speech-to-Text API requests. Like any other user account, a service account is represented by an email address. In this section, you will use the Cloud SDK to create a service account and then create credentials you will need to authenticate as the service account.


Using the Speech-to-Text API with C#

#artificialintelligence

In order to make requests to the Speech-to-Text API, you need to use a Service Account. A Service Account belongs to your project and it is used by the Google Client C# library to make Speech-to-Text API requests. Like any other user account, a service account is represented by an email address. In this section, you will use the Cloud SDK to create a service account and then create credentials you will need to authenticate as the service account.


How police are using voice recognition to make their jobs safer

ZDNet

Speech recognition tools are changing the way people work and live their lives, bringing assistants like Alexa into their daily routines and transcribing meetings more accurately than a human could. When it comes to policing, speech recognition tools can help uniformed officers and detectives with critical note-taking and even possibly help prevent life-threatening situations. ZDNet spoke with Mark Geremia of Nuance Communications and Chief Joseph Solomon of the Methuen, Mass. Police Department to talk about the way police work is evolving thanks to voice recognition, cloud computing and other new technologies. The Methuen PD is one of the police departments now using Dragon Law Enforcement, Nuance's voice recognition product designed specifically for first responders.


Alexa and Google Assistant are 30% less likely to understand non-American accents

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Can't get your Amazon Echo or Google Home smart speaker to understand you? It might be your accent. Two teams of researchers recruited by The Washington Post found that Amazon's Alexa assistant and the Google Assistant exhibit a pattern of poor performance with certain dialects. They tested thousands of voice commands dictated by more than 100 people across 20 cities, and the results were conclusive: Google's and Amazon's speakers were 30 percent less likely to understand non-American accents than those of native-born users, and the overall accuracy rate for Chinese, Indian, and Spanish accents was about 80 percent. It points to clear evidence of bias in the data used to train the two voice recognition systems, Rachael Tatman, a Kaggle data scientist with expertise in speech recognition, told The Washington Post.


The Workplace Powered by AI Has Arrived, and Its Impact on Productivity

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on ITProPortal and has been republished with permission. The workplace of the future is going to be made up of hyper-connected workers, and AI will play its part in ensuring this outcome. Soon, digital assistants, voice-controlled devices, and huddle rooms will be commonplace in the office. For businesses, this rise in AI assistance will greatly improve workplace collaboration and free up valuable time for employees to undertake more productive activities. Today's tech-savvy employees are well-versed in tech such as live video and instant messenger to connect and collaborate from anywhere in the world.


Voice assistants still have problems understanding strong accents

Engadget

Cultural biases in tech aren't just limited to facial recognition -- they crop up in voice assistants as well. The Washington Post has partnered with research groups on studies showing that Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant aren't as accurate understanding people with strong accents, no matter how fluent their English might be. People with Indian accents were at a relatively mild disadvantage in one study, but the overall accuracy went down by at least 2.6 percent for those with Chinese accents, and by as much as 4.2 percent for Spanish accents. The gap was particularly acute in media playback, where a Spanish accent might net a 79.9 accuracy rate versus 91.8 percent from an Eastern US accent. A second study showed how voice assistants would frequently mangle interpretations when people read news headlines out loud.


VoiceMojo: Voice AI to Make Your Life Easier and Smarter

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VoiceMojo is a portable PUSH-to-TALK Voice Assistant device, links up to all voice service platforms including Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant & Apple Siri. It recognizes the natural language, provides a direct interaction with the voice AI technology. You can ask questions, request services and control your smart home devices. VoieMojo uses the Automatic Speech Recognition ( ASR), Natural Language Understanding ( NLU), and Text-to-Speech ( TTS) processes to handle complex voice commands. Carrying VoiceMojo, you will have unprecedented control to manage everything around you, let VoiceMojo transforms your speech into reality.


Creepy vs cool: Which technologies do we trust, and which do fear?

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Fingerprint scanners, voice recognition, targeted ads, home voice assistants. These technologies are all part of everyday modern life and are revolutionising the way retailers sell their products to consumers across the world. But have we actually taken the time to stop and consider what customers think of our ever increasing arsenal of tech tricks to entice and persuade? Every year we survey consumers in the UK, France and Germany to gain an understanding into what technologies they think are'creepy' or'cool'. The results from this year's survey are just in – giving us a top 5 'creepy' and top 5 'cool' list of tech that shoppers love or loathe.