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AI remains priority for CEOs, according to new Gartner survey

#artificialintelligence

For the third year running, AI is the top priority for CEOs, according to a survey of CEOs and senior executives released by Gartner on Wednesday. The findings also revealed that the metaverse, which has received a lot of hype in the last year, especially since the rebranding of Facebook to Meta, is not as relevant to business leaders – 63% say that they do not see the metaverse as a key technology for their organization. It's not a big surprise that AI continues to be on the mind of top business leaders. As TechRepublic reported in June 2021, 97% of senior executives planned to invest heavily in AI. Jobs in AI, which are often high-pay, are also in demand, according to the jobs board Indeed.com.


Facebook issues $397 checks to Illinois residents as part of class-action lawsuit

Engadget

More than a million Illinois residents will receive a $397 settlement payment from Facebook this week, thanks to a legal battle over the platform's since-retired photo-tagging system that used facial recognition. It's been nearly seven years since the 2015 class-action lawsuit was first filed, which accused Facebook of breaking a state privacy law that forbids companies from collecting biometric data without informing users. The platform has since faced broad, global criticism for its use of facial recognition tech, and last year Meta halted the practice completely on Facebook and Instagram. But as Vox notes, the company has made no promises to avoid facial recognition in future products. Even though it was first filed in Illinois, the class-action lawsuit eventually wound up on Facebook's home turf -- at the U.S. District Court for Northern California.


Elon Musk's Twitter Bot Problem Is Fake News

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

With his professed concern about fake accounts on Twitter, Elon Musk appears to be grasping at legal straws in an attempt to back out of his commitment to buy the social networking company for $54.20 a share, or at least to pay less for it. But his gambit has shined a light on a real scourge of online companies and their users. Counting the autonomous accounts that mimic real people is just as slippery as valuing companies. A 2020 study by Adrian Rauchfleisch and Jonas Kaiser looking at thousands of Twitter accounts, including hundreds of verified politicians as well as "obvious" bots, found Botometer, the industry-standard learning algorithm trained to calculate the likelihood an account is a bot, yields imprecise scores leading to both false negatives and false positives.


The 5 best dating apps of 2022

ZDNet

You may find forever love on the platform, but Tinder is an app best designed for more casual connections. The new Millennial dating app offers casual daters to find like-minded matches, although that does not mean there are no opportunities for serious relationships. As the app says, "You can be here for a long time, and a good time, too." There have been 30 billion matches to date worldwide, further attesting to its convenient use and short-term compatibility. Free to use, you can designate your sexual orientation to narrow the dating pool and then wait for viewers, which you can easily track under the Likes You feature.


The Download: The grim spread of the Buffalo shooting video, and crypto's tough test

MIT Technology Review

Although Twitch took down the livestream within two minutes from the start of the attack, a recording of the video was swiftly posted on a site called Streamable. That video was viewed more than 3 million times before it was taken down, according to the New York Times. Links to the recording were shared across Facebook and Twitter, and another clip that purported to show the gunman firing at people in the supermarket was visible on Twitter more than four hours after being uploaded. Additionally, TikTok users shared search terms that would take viewers to the full video on Twitter, according to Washington Post reporter Taylor Lorenz. Although Twitch removed the livestream in less time than the 17 minutes it took Facebook to take down the live broadcast of the 2019 mosque shooting.


Watch the sessions from AI UK

AIHub

Hosted by the Alan Turing Institute, AI UK was a two day conference that showcased AI research, development, and policy in the UK. The event took place on 22 and 23 March, and participants were treated to a variety of interesting talks, panel discussions, and conversations on a wide variety of topics. We covered some of the policy and strategy-related sessions in this article. The organisers have now made the recorded content from the conference available for everyone to watch. This can all be found on the Institute's YouTube channel.


How to write witty banter on dating apps, according to bestselling authors

Mashable

It's the dream: Find a smoldering someone on a dating app, match with them, and quickly launch into a conversation filled with subtle compliments, definitive date night plans, and witty repartee. According to research conducted by Preply, -- a language learning app and platform, – more than 70 percent of dating app users surveyed said it's possible to engage in meaningful conversation, and even fall in love with someone, before ever meeting in person (having only spoken on an app). The challenge, of course, is getting there, shifting from the notification that "It's A Match!" into dialogue worthy of a Shonda Rhimes production. It's a daunting task, so we brought in the pros: rom-com authors. Mashable spoke with several -- all with books jam-packed with quippy dialogue out this spring and summer -- to get their expert takes on how to write witty banter.


Data the dog: Twitter turns its privacy policy into an old-school video game

The Guardian

On Friday, Elon Musk announced he was pausing his $45bn purchase of Twitter because he had only just discovered some of the accounts on the site were fake. But that's not the strangest thing that has happened to the beleaguered social media platform this week. Because on Tuesday the current top brass, perhaps trying to demonstrate their vision for the site, released a Super Nintendo-style browser game that recaps Twitter's private policy. The platform unveiled Twitter Data Dash, which plays like a vintage side-scrolling platformer that's been draped with a healthy dose of disinformation anxiety. You take control of a blue-hued puppy named Data and are tasked with retrieving five bones hidden in each of the game's day-glo urban environments.


Column One: In their search for love, South Asians swipe right on dating apps catered for them

Los Angeles Times

Most swiping for love on a dating app know the drill. Perhaps declare intentions: Looking for something serious? The dating app Mirchi presents another possibility: "Auntie made me sign up." The option is part joke, part knowing nod to its audience. Unlike the mainstream apps such as Tinder or Bumble, Mirchi is among the growing world of dating apps created by and catering to South Asians.


Why Some Instagram And Facebook Filters Can't Be Used In Texas After Lawsuit

International Business Times

Instagram and Facebook users in Texas lost access to certain augmented reality filters Wednesday, following a lawsuit accusing parent company Meta of violating privacy laws. In February, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton revealed he would sue Meta for using facial recognition in filters to collect data for commercial purposes without consent. Paxton claimed Meta was "storing millions of biometric identifiers" that included voiceprints, retina or iris scans, and hand and face geometry. Although Meta argued it does not use facial recognition technology, it has disabled its AR filters and avatars on Facebook and Instagram amid the litigation. The AR effects featured on Facebook, Messenger, Messenger Kids, and Portal will also be shut down for Texas users.