science fiction


3 ways AI is already transforming business

#artificialintelligence

This article was contributed by Vincent Brissot, Head of Digital Automation & Channel Operations at HP. When you think of Artificial Intelligence (AI), it's easy to imagine Jarvis from Iron Man, or any of the lovable droids from the Star Wars universe. Sometimes, you may even think of AI villains, like Skynet from the Terminator series, or HAL 9000 from Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey. AI has long been a tool only seen in science fiction stories, but now it is a reality and its transforming the way we live. From autonomous vehicles to cashier-less shops, robot tutors to robo-advisors, it's safe to say that society is quickly embracing its automated future.


Vuture AI-more-than-human

#artificialintelligence

For so many of us, artificial intelligence (AI) is a completely intangible thing – often drawing us in towards the realm of science fiction. In a professional sense, it is hard to see yet filters into our everyday lives. For us marketers, its lack of visibility can leave us struggling to fully get to grips with what is means for our business decisions. So, when I saw that the Barbican Centre in London had curated an exhibition on artificial intelligence, AI: more than human, I was keen to go along and immerse myself in the experience. In spite of the fact it isn't specifically about AI in the workplace, I thought, whilst getting up close and personal with its history as well as some of the latest technology, there might be transferrable ideas and concepts that would inspire and give me a better grasp of what it offers.


Working Futures: The Future Of Work May Be Beautiful

#artificialintelligence

We're off today for the long weekend, but I wanted to use the opportunity to publish the last of our posts about the stories in our Working Futures science fiction anthology about the future of work. If you haven't read the earlier ones, they're here: The post will cover the final two stories in the book, which both really stood out when we went through the selection process. This is Holly's second story in our collection and among the many things we loved about it was how it really painted a picture of a potentially very different world -- which held the possibility of being beautiful, but also possibly terrifying. And it raises questions about how our future world will connect with the past. A Brief History of Algorithmic Life: Introduction, by Christopher Alex Hooton, is the final piece in the book for a reason.


Blade Runner: 5 Things That Are Scientifically Accurate (And 5 That Make No Sense)

#artificialintelligence

Ridley Scott's Blade Runner was a game changer in the world of science-fiction. In 1982, the same year that kid-friendly films like E.T. were released conveying the adventures of a cuddly extra-terrestrial, Scott's vision of the near-future was introducing thought-provoking questions about the advancement of artificial intelligence, humankind's desire to play God, and what constituted being "human" with the rise of genetic engineering. Set in 2019 Los Angeles after the degradation of Earth from a nuclear war, resources are scarce and anyone wealthy enough to do so ventures off-world. Off-world planets are colonized by replicants, synthetic beings created for the purpose of slave labor and dangerous activities unfit for humans. After a replicant revolt, they're forbidden from returning to Earth, but a few escape in a shuttle intent on making a better life for themselves.


We're clearly out of good stories, so here's some science fiction books written by artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

If there's anything that machine learning has taught us, it's that artificial intelligence can't write for shit--just look at this very horny, but very bad A.I. …


The Artificial Intelligence Task Force Wants to Do AI the Vermont Way

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence was once the stuff of science fiction. Now it's here, and every publication from the Washington Post to Wired to the Wall Street Journal is full of articles and videos exploring it. Depending on whom you listen to, AI will be a job killer or a job creator; a tool to boost productivity or Skynet from the Terminator movies; a technology that will dramatically transform society or an overhyped nothingburger. To help prepare for this uncertain and potentially disturbing future, Gov. Phil Scott impaneled an Artificial Intelligence Task Force in 2018. Its mandate: to "investigate the field of artificial intelligence" in the state and make recommendations for how the technology can be responsibly applied in Vermont's economy and government.


Sci-Fi Doesn't Have to Be Depressing: Welcome to Solarpunk www.ozy.com

#artificialintelligence

Imagine a scene, set in the future, where a child in Burning Man–style punk clothing is standing in front of a yurt powered by solar panels. There weren't many books with scenes like that in 2014, when Sarena Ulibarri, an editor, first grew interested in a genre of science fiction that imagines a renewable and sustainable future. Welcome to solarpunk, a new genre within science fiction that is a reaction against the perceived pessimism of present-day sci-fi and hopes to bring optimistic stories about the future with the aim of encouraging people to change the present. The first book that explicitly identified as solarpunk was Solarpunk: Histórias ecológicas e fantásticas em um mundo sustentável (Solarpunk: Ecological and Fantastic Stories in a Sustainable World), a Brazilian book published in 2012. In 2014, author Adam Flynn wrote Solarpunk: Notes Toward a Manifesto.


Computers Gone Wild--6 Movies to Help You Ponder Our Quantum Future

#artificialintelligence

How do you explain quantum computing? Think of that vintage telephone at the General Store on Petticoat Junction. Put it next to your iPhone. Every day, it seems like there is news of yet another breakthrough in computing. Technology experts debate exactly when we will all have quantum computers instead of Echo Dots, but the day is coming.


Disruptive Innovation - You Cannot Stop Progress

#artificialintelligence

My wife's father was a perfect mix of Walter Mattheu & Fred Flintstone. He didn't talk much so when he did you tended to listen. My wife's name is Kate but he called her Kay. When we first met, in the mid-1970s, I remember Ivan asking her about our relationship: "Now Kay, I always raised you to make the right decisions; now are you sure that you want to marry this guy?" There was something to his statement because, at that time, I didn't have two nickles to rub together and my prospects didn't look good.


Airswift: automation and human centricity in recruitment

#artificialintelligence

In 1899, French artist Jean-Marc Côté was among a team of illustrators commissioned to create a series of drawings to commemorate the 1900 world's fair in Paris. The series, originally printed as inserts for cigar boxes (and then later reprinted, but never sold, as postcards - science fiction author Isaac Asimov reportedly owned the only surviving set) took the artists' best guess at how technology would change our lives by the advent of the 21st century. The subject matter of En L'An 2000 is, for the most part, spectacularly off the mark. Firefighters battle flames while flying through the air on bat wings, deep sea divers ride giant seahorses through the ocean and students have the contents of history books transferred directly into their brains via psychic helmets. Endearingly hopeful and bizarre, Côté and his fellow artists' work does betray just how hard it is to predict where the next wave of technological developments will take us.