rubik's cube


Robotic hand made by Elon Musk's OpenAI learns to solve Rubik's Cube

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Last year we were amazed by the level of dexterity achieved by OpenAI's Dactyl system which was able to learn how to manipulate a cube block to display any commanded side/face.If you missed that article, read about it here. OpenAI then set themselves a harder task of teaching the robotic hand to solve a Rubik's cube. Quite a daunting task made no easier by the fact that it would use one hand which most humans would find it hard to do. OpenAI harnessed the power of neural networks which are trained entirely in simulation. However, one of the main challenges faced was to make the simulations as realistic as possible because physical factors like friction, elasticity etc. are very hard to model.


A robot hand taught itself to solve a Rubik's Cube after creating its own training regime

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Over a year ago, OpenAI, the San Francisco–based for-profit AI research lab, announced that it had trained a robotic hand to manipulate a cube with remarkable dexterity. That might not sound earth-shattering. But in the AI world, it was impressive for two reasons. First, the hand had taught itself how to fidget with the cube using a reinforcement-learning algorithm, a technique modeled on the way animals learn. Second, all the training had been done in simulation, but it managed to successfully translate to the real world.


Rubik's Cube owner loses EU trademark for iconic puzzle's shape

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 24 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com The owner of the Rubik's Cube has lost an appeal to regain the European Union trademark rights to the classic puzzle's iconic shape in a new twist to the ongoing legal drama. Rubik's Brand Ltd. lost the protection rights to the puzzle's shape in 2017, after the EU's top court ruled that law prevents the firm from having "a monopoly on technical solutions or functional characteristics of a product," Bloomberg reported. The EU General Court in Luxembourg upheld that decision on Thursday.


Why a robot that can 'solve' Rubik's Cube one-handed has the AI community at war

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OpenAI, a non-profit co-founded by Elon Musk, recently unveiled its newest trick: A robot hand that can'solve' Rubik's Cube. Whether this is a feat of science or mere prestidigitation is a matter of some debate in the AI community right now. In case you missed it, OpenAI posted an article on its blog last week titled "Solving Rubik's Cube With a Robot Hand." Based on this title, you'd be forgiven if you thought the research discussed in said article was about solving Rubik's Cube with a robot hand. Don't get me wrong, OpenAI created a software and machine learning pipeline by which a robot hand can physically manipulate a Rubik's Cube from an'unsolved' state to a solved one.


This robot can now solve a Rubik's cube with one hand

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Once again, a robot can do something I cannot do. Researchers at the artificial intelligence lab OpenAI just revealed that its humanoid robotic hand can solve a Rubik's cube. The researchers utilized a pair of neural networks to make it happen. The team has been working on this project, named Dactyl, since the middle of 2017, and they felt showing their robotic hand could solve a Rubik's cube would show it had adequate dexterity. It can now solve the cube about 60 percent of the time.


OpenAI's AI-powered robot learned how to solve a Rubik's cube one-handed

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Artificial intelligence research organization OpenAI has achieved a new milestone in its quest to build general purpose, self-learning robots. The group's robotics division says Dactyl, its humanoid robotic hand first developed last year, has learned to solve a Rubik's cube one-handed. OpenAI sees the feat as a leap forward both for the dexterity of robotic appendages and its own AI software, which allows Dactyl to learn new tasks using virtual simulations before it is presented with a real, physical challenge to overcome. In a demonstration video showcasing Dactyl's new talent, we can see the robotic hand fumble its way toward a complete cube solve with clumsy yet accurate maneuvers. It takes many minutes, but Dactyl is eventually able to solve the puzzle.


New Robot Can Solve a Rubik's Cube with Just One Hand Lwin Htut Kyaw Digital Creator Mandalay Myanmar

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OpenAI has come up with a new robot capable of solving a Rubik's Cube with a single hand. The AI-based company trained neural networks in simulation using reinforcement learning to make this achievement possible. The company has been working on this project since May 2017 and has now achieved its goal marking this as a milestone towards its progress in the field of AI. The time taken by the robotic hand varies depending on how the cube is shuffled but on average, it takes about four minutes to solve the puzzle. However, it is worth noting that this is not the first-ever robot that managed to solve the Rubik's cube.


This Week In AI: Algolia Raises $110M, OpenAI Debuts Rubik's Cube Solving Bot, Kleiner Perkins Backs Cell Therapy Startup - CB Insights Research

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Medical data analytics startup Healx raised $56M from Atomico and others. Standard Cognition patented an inventory management system. Here's what went down in artificial intelligence this week. Become a CB Insights customer. If you're already a customer, log in here.


This robotic hand learned to solve a Rubik's Cube on its own -- just like a human.

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One reason, researchers say: there are billions of potential moves available to a Rubik's Cube player, with the puzzle's six sides and nine sections, but only one goal: each of the cube's six sides displaying a solid color. Finding a solution to a puzzle with that degree of complexity, and among billions of potentialities, involves a degree of abstract thinking that, researchers say, begins to approximate human reasoning and decision-making.