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Tesla to be served search warrant over crash as Elon Musk denies autopilot was used

The Independent - Tech

Police in Texas investigating a Tesla car crash in which two men died will serve search warrants on the company to ascertain if the vehicle's autopilot mode was engaged at the time of the incident. However Tesla's CEO, Elon Musk, has said the self-driving feature was not being used, based on an internal probe by the company. In the incident, two men, both in their 50s, were killed after their 2019 Tesla Model S crashed into a tree and caught fire. According to police reports, the car was travelling at a high speed and failed to negotiate a curve in the road. Texas police noted that nobody was at the driving seat at the time of impact, raising doubts about the involvement of the car's autopilot mode.


Is AI there yet?

#artificialintelligence

It's a cold winter day in Detroit, but the sun is shining bright. Robert Williams decided to spend some quality time rolling on his house's front loan with his two daughters. Suddenly, police officers appeared from nowhere and brought to an abrupt halt a perfect family day. Robert was ripped from the arms of his crying daughters without an explanation, and cold handcuffs now gripped his hands. The police took him away in no time! His family were left shaken in disbelief at the scene which had unfolded in front of their eyes. What followed for Robert were 30 long hours in police custody.


Inside the rise of police department real-time crime centers

MIT Technology Review

In 2021, it might be simpler to ask what can't be mapped. Just as Google and social media have enabled each of us to reach into the figurative diaries and desk drawers of anyone we might be curious about, law enforcement agencies today have access to powerful new engines of data processing and association. Ogden is hardly the tip of the spear: police agencies in major cities are already using facial recognition to identify suspects--sometimes falsely--and deploying predictive policing to define patrol routes. "That's not happening here," Ogden's current police chief, Eric Young, told me. "We don't have any kind of machine intelligence."


Artificial Intelligence: Can We Trust Machines to Make Fair Decisions?

#artificialintelligence

But what happens when artificial intelligence is biased? What if it makes mistakes on important decisions -- from who gets a job interview or a mortgage to who gets arrested and how much time they ultimately serve for a crime? "These everyday decisions can greatly affect the trajectories of our lives and increasingly, they're being made not by people, but by machines," said UC Davis computer science professor Ian Davidson. A growing body of research, including Davidson's, indicates that bias in artificial intelligence can lead to biased outcomes, especially for minority populations and women. Facial recognition technologies, for example, have come under increasing scrutiny because they've been shown to better detect white faces than they do the faces of people with darker skin.


Attack of the drones: the mystery of disappearing swarms in the US midwest

The Guardian

At twilight on New Year's Eve, 2020, Placido Montoya, 35, a plumber from Fort Morgan, Colorado, was driving to work. Ahead of him he noticed blinking lights in the sky. He'd heard rumours of mysterious drones, whispers in his local community, but now he was seeing them with his own eyes. In the early morning gloom, it was hard to make out how big the lights were and how many were hovering above him. But one thing was clear to Montoya: he needed to give chase.


Surveillance is All About the (Software) Brain

#artificialintelligence

Eyes are important, don't get me wrong. So are ears, noses, tongues, fingers, balance calibration organs and everything else that feeds that massive brain of yours.1 Salinity detectors in narwhals, electrical sensors in freshwater bottom feeders, echolocation in bats all provide sensory input that humans couldn't adequately process. Every beast has its own senses relevant to its own living conditions. Even your smartphone has cameras, microphones, gyroscopes, an accelerometer, a magnetometer, interfaces for phone/GPS/Bluetooth/WiFi, and some have a barometer, proximity sensors, and ambient light sensors. Biometric sensing equipment in today's phones can include optical, capacitive or ultrasonic fingerprint readers and an infrared map sensor for faces.


Council Post: Guard Digital Identity With Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

With more companies moving their business models online and adopting new solutions, it's been opening up more opportunities for cybercrime and identity theft. The spread of Covid-19 has only made it worse, as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) estimated a loss of $13.4 million to Covid-19 scams as of April 15, 2020. This makes the protection of digital identity more important than ever before. This is also a new era of identity authentication. With artificial intelligence (AI) and biometrics, users today are enjoying more streamlined processes while reaping the benefits of added security.


$74,000 NYPD robot dog hits streets of Manhattan

#artificialintelligence

A robot dog joined the human members of the NYPD's response to a domestic dispute inside a public housing apartment building in Manhattan. NEW YORK - Now viral videos show -- for lack of a better term -- a robot dog joining the human members of the NYPD's response to a domestic dispute inside a NYCHA building in Kips Bay, Monday. "I can't believe what I'm seeing," 344 E. 28th St. Tenant Association President Melanie Aucello said. Aucello shot one of those viral videos on her smartphone and compared the scene she witnessed to something out of a dystopian movie. "It scared me," she said.


How to shut down Spot the robot 'dog,' should you ever need to

Mashable

Let's say, just hypothetically, that a surveillance robot styled after a dog was giving you a hard time. In this situation, you'd want to shut the thing down, and quickly. Thankfully, when it comes to Boston Dynamic's Spot robot, there are several ways to do just that. The robots, marketed for industrial use and used for viral hijinks, evoke a robot dystopia in the public imagination -- a fact compounded by an April viral video of the NYPD trotting out its very own customized Spot. The first reported instance of police using Spot was in November of 2019, when the Massachusetts State Police leased at least one of the robots for a three-month trial period.


Tinder's plan for criminal record checks raises fears of 'lifelong punishment'

The Guardian

When Jerrel Gantt was released from prison after three years, he was handed a pamphlet about healthcare and nothing else. He began searching for employment, a deep source of anxiety for him, and secured housing through a ministry in New York City. He later enrolled in school part-time. As he settled into life outside of prison and developed a support system, Gantt began going on dates with people he met on apps like Tinder. The process has not been without challenges – revealing that he is formerly incarcerated usually comes up early in the dating process for Gantt.