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Interim director takes over Joint Artificial Intelligence Center

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As he departs, the Defense Department's top artificial intelligence official says the foundation is set for the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center -- but now it must deliver. "The foundational elements are now in place. What we have to do in the course of the next one to two years is deliver. This is about delivery first and foremost," Lt. Gen. Jack Shanahan said during a virtual Mitchell Institute event June 4. "What we have to do is show that we're making a difference."


Pentagon Taps Rescue Funds to Use AI for Virus Care, Vaccine - Bloomberg Government

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The Defense Department is seeking to adapt artificial intelligence technology it uses to track down terrorists with drones or predict when aircraft need maintenance for a new purpose: screening and testing novel coronavirus treatments and vaccines. The Pentagon plans to boost existing programs with money Congress provided under the virus-relief CARES Act for the "development of artificial intelligence-based models to rapidly screen, prioritize, and test Food and Drug Administration approved therapeutics for new COVID-19 drug candidates." The AI funds would also be tapped for human test trials for vaccines and antibody based treatments, according to the spending plan the department submitted to congressional panels. Dick Durbin (Ill.), the Senate's No. 2 Democrat and ranking member on the Appropriations Defense Subcommittee, pressed for the plan's release. While the amount of money the Pentagon wants to use on these programs is small---close to $1 million--it shows some of the department's urgency to apply new technology to choke off the pandemic.


AI Has Now Reached The Battlefield With Killer Robots, Automated Weapons & UAVs

#artificialintelligence

With technology evolving at a fast pace, we have come a long way from the basic computers to presently using artificial intelligence in modern human warfare. In the current scenario of the world, it wouldn't be wrong to say that the country with the best technology intelligence and machines will be the strongest during the war. The era hasn't yet reached up till the dystopian future involving robocops, hammer drones or the Terminator. Instead, AI is being used to acquire better insights and make better decisions. Although we definitely cannot disregard the fact that artificial intelligence can be more dangerous than nuclear warheads, as once stated by Elon Musk.


LTTE: It's important to know of weaponized artificial intelligence - The Rocky Mountain Collegian

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Editor's Note: All opinion section content reflects the views of the individual author only and does not represent a stance taken by The Collegian or its editorial board. Letters to the Editor reflect the view of a member of the campus community and are submitted to the publication for approval. I am writing this essay to bring awareness and recognition to a fast-approaching topic in the field of military technology -- weaponized artificial intelligence. Weaponized AI is any military technology that operates off a computer system that makes its own decisions. Simply put, anything that automatically decides a course of action against an enemy without human control would fall under this definition.


Peter Thiel to Silicon Valley: 'Unethical' not to help U.S. military compete with China

FOX News

Billionaire Silicon Valley investor and PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel called on American technology companies to step up innovation and resist pressures to reject military partnerships, arguing the U.S. is lagging behind China in the technology race. "The China dynamic has changed things tremendously in the last few years. China is going to force us to compete, to think much harder, [about] how we can deploy technologies much faster," Thiel said during a discussion at the Reagan National Defense Forum on Friday, which was livestreamed on Fox Nation. Thiel was commenting on a study by data and analytics company Govini, which showed that the U.S.'s share in global research and development spending declined from more than 60 percent in 1967, to less than 30 percent today. Meanwhile, China's share of the world R&D spending has increased significantly and today China has a larger share than the U.S. did at the height of the Cold War.


Google Bans Artificial Intelligence for Weapon Use - Gadget Reviewed

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According to the Google leadership, the company will not renew its Project Maven contract when it expires in 2019. Project Maven is the company's involvement with the U.S. military which involves the use of Artificial Intelligence to detect and identify people or objects in military drone surveillance videos. Many of the employees at Google were upset and 3,000 of them signed a petition voicing their concerns of Google's involvement with the military which could in turn be harmful for Google. They were against the development of image recognition technology which could be used by military drones to identify and track objects. It was reported on June 1 by Gizmodo that the company would not renew the Project Maven contract after June 2019.


How Google plans to make AI less mysterious

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There is a problem with artificial intelligence. It can be amazing at churning through gigantic amounts of data to solve challenges that humans struggle with. But understanding how it makes its decisions is often very difficult to do, if not impossible. That means when an AI model works it is not as easy as it should be to make further refinements, and when it exhibits odd behaviour it can be hard to fix. But at an event in London this week, Google's cloud computing division pitched a new facility that it hopes will give it the edge on Microsoft and Amazon, which dominate the sector.


Google tackles the black box problem with Explainable AI

#artificialintelligence

There is a problem with artificial intelligence. It can be amazing at churning through gigantic amounts of data to solve challenges that humans struggle with. But understanding how it makes its decisions is often very difficult to do, if not impossible. That means when an AI model works it is not as easy as it should be to make further refinements, and when it exhibits odd behaviour it can be hard to fix. But at an event in London this week, Google's cloud computing division pitched a new facility that it hopes will give it the edge on Microsoft and Amazon, which dominate the sector.


The U.S. military, algorithmic warfare, and big tech

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We learned this week that the Department of Defense is using facial recognition at scale, and Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said he believes China is selling lethal autonomous drones. Amid all that, you may have missed Joint AI Center (JAIC) director Lieutenant General Jack Shanahan -- who is charged by the Pentagon with modernizing and guiding artificial intelligence directives -- talking about a future of algorithmic warfare. Algorithmic warfare, which could dramatically change warfare as we know it, is built on the assumption that combat actions will happen faster than humans' ability to make decisions. Shanahan says algorithmic warfare would thus require some reliance on AI systems, though he stresses a need to implement rigorous testing and evaluation before using AI in the field to ensure it doesn't "take on a life of its own, so to speak." "We are going to be shocked by the speed, the chaos, the bloodiness, and the friction of a future fight in which this will be playing out, maybe in microseconds at times. How do we envision that fight happening? It has to be algorithm against algorithm," Shanahan said during a conversation with former Google CEO Eric Schmidt and Google VP of global affairs Kent Walker.


A group of tech executives warn military about unintended harm caused by AI in combat

Daily Mail - Science & tech

This week, the Defense Innovation Board issued a series of recommendations to the Department of Defense on how artificial intelligence should be implemented in future military conflict. The Defense Innovation Board was first created in 2016 to establish a series of best practices on potential collaborations between the US military and Silicon Valley. There are sixteen current board members from a broad number of disciplines, including former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, Facebook executive Marne Levine, Microsoft's Chief Digital Officer Kurt Delbene, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, Steve Jobs biographer Walter Isaacson, and LinkedIn co-founded Reid Hoffman. 'Now is the time, at this early stage of the resurgence of interest in AI, to hold serious discussions about norms of AI development and use in a military context--long before there has been an incident.' the report says. The report says that using AI for military actions or decision-making comes with'the duty to take feasible precautions to reduce the risk of harm to the civilian population and other protected persons and objects.'