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The Morning After: Will AI be your next lawyer?

Engadget

In a new study, University of Minnesota law professors used ChatGPT AI chatbot to answer graduate exams at four courses in their school. The AI passed all four, but with an average grade of C . The University of Minnesota group noted ChatGPT was good at addressing "basic legal rules" and summaries, but it floundered when trying to pinpoint issues relevant in a case. When faced with business management questions in a different study, the generator was "amazing" with simple operations management and process analysis questions, but it couldn't handle advanced process questions. It even made mistakes with sixth-grade-level math – something other AI authors have struggled with.


Robot Cars Are Causing 911 False Alarms in San Francisco

WIRED

For some residents of San Francisco, the robotic future of driving is just a tap away. Ride-hailing services from GM subsidiary Cruise and Alphabet company Waymo allow them to summon a driverless ride with an app. But some riders have become perhaps too comfortable with the technology. In a letter filed with a California regulator yesterday, city agencies complained that on three separate occasions since December, Cruise staff called 911 after a passenger in one of its driverless vehicles became "unresponsive" to the two-way voice link installed in each car. Each time, police and firefighters rushed to the scene but found the same thing: a passenger who had fallen asleep in their robot ride.


Audi's Activesphere EV concept is built for off-roading and augmented reality

Engadget

Audi has finally revealed the Activesphere EV concept it promised last summer. The crossover is built to go off-road, complete with a rugged underbody, a liftable suspension and easy ways to carry your sports gear. The rear can transform into a loading area with enough room for your e-bikes, for instance. It nonetheless features a sedan-like profile and the creature comforts of past concepts, including a spacious, bright interior designed for relaxing while the vehicle is in self-driving mode. The cabin reflects Audi's confidence in augmented reality.


MailOnline takes a ride in BMW's new £110,000 smart car with a 32-INCH cinema screen

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The days of shotgunning the front seat may soon be over thanks to BMW, which has taken backseat luxury to new levels in its high-tech £110,000 smart car. MailOnline took a ride in the new fully-electric BMW i7, which has 5G connectivity, interior mood lighting and a super-wide'theatre screen' in the back. The 8K screen, which measures 32x9 inches, folds out from the sun roof at the touch of a button and streams video from Netflix, YouTube and more. BMW gave me a ride during my morning commute through west London - a welcome alternative to the cramped and temperamental Underground. BMW i7, part of the legendary Series 7 range, boasts 5G connectivity, interior mood lighting and a theatre screen' in the backseat The new vehicle's proudest feature is the theatre screen, which, at 32x9 inches is really super-wide The BMW i7 is a new electric variant of the BMW 7 Series, which has been in production by the German automaker since 1977.


The robots of CES 2023

Robohub

Robots were on the main expo floor at CES this year, and these weren't just cool robots for marketing purposes. I've been tracking robots at CES for more than 10 years, watching the transition from robot toys to real robots. Increasing prominence has been given to self-driving cars, LiDARs and eVTOL drones, but, in my mind it was really the inclusion of John Deere and agricultural robots last year that confirmed that CES was incorporating more industry, more real machines, not just gadgets. In fact, according to the organizing association CTA or the Consumer Technology Association, these days CES no longer stands for the Consumer Electronics Show. CES now just stands for CES, one of the world's largest technology expos.


Two Planes Almost Crashed at JFK Last Week. That's Vanishingly Rare for a Reason.

Slate

The night of 2023's first Friday the 13th, passengers on a Delta flight from New York City's John F. Kennedy International Airport were accelerating down the runway, about to go wheels-up, when the pilot slammed on the brakes. Passengers jolted forward as the plane lurched to a halt, 1,000 feet short of where a rogue Boeing 777 had just crossed their path. The 777, an American Airlines flight, had taxied in a leisurely loop around the airport to get into position for takeoff, when it was supposed to hang a right. Instead, it continued ahead, crossing a runway where Delta Flight 1943 was already cleared for takeoff. Fuck!" said one air traffic controller. "American 106 heavy, hold position!" said another. "Delta 1943, cancel takeoff clearance!


AI to unpick liability in autonomous vehicle incidents

#artificialintelligence

Autonomous trucks, operating at least at SAE Level 4 are plying the roads in Texas, California and elsewhere, and driverless buses are on the way. While self-driving passenger vehicles are slightly behind, they will be here--en masse-- very soon, experts say. And while many believe autonomous vehicles will result in greater road safety, no technology is perfect. Even with their currently limited numbers on the road, self-driving vehicles have been involved in collisions and can, just like any other vehicles, sustain physical damage, even from minor incidents. As more autonomous vehicles take to the road, the number of incidents in which they are involved will grow.


Top 7 AI Trends To Watch For In 2023 – Voice Of EU

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) surged in popularity last year, as both businesses and the public saw first-hand examples of its potential applications. Companies like OpenAI released a wave of public demos, such as the advanced chatbot ChatGPT that has drawn the attention of Microsoft. Text-to-image generators such as Dall-E 2, Midjourney and Stable Diffusion took the limelight, as millions of users began to create their own AI-generated art, to the anger of artists and companies such as Getty Images. In its tech predictions for 2023, Dell Technologies Ireland said AI could become the "main engine of innovation" for the year, as more organisations adopt the technology to harness the full potential of data and support teams across a business. The sector has shown no sign of slowing down so far this year, with OpenAI reportedly in talks to raise funds at a $29bn valuation, Apple rolling out an AI audio narration tool and Microsoft researching an AI model that can simulate anyone's voice from only three seconds of audio.


Top 7 AI trends to watch out for in 2023

#artificialintelligence

The leaps AI made last year are expected to boost the digital transformation of businesses, while disrupting various sectors such as cybersecurity and autotech. Artificial intelligence (AI) surged in popularity last year, as both businesses and the public saw first-hand examples of its potential applications. Companies such as OpenAI released a wave of public demos, including the advanced chatbot ChatGPT which has drawn the attention of Microsoft. Text-to-image generators such as Dall-E 2, Midjourney and Stable Diffusion took the limelight as millions of users began to create their own AI-generated art, much to the anger of artists and companies such as Getty Images. In its tech predictions for 2023, Dell Technologies Ireland said AI could become the "main engine of innovation" for the year, as more organisations adopt the technology to harness the full potential of data and support teams across a business.


Elon Musk's Appetite for Destruction - The New York Times

#artificialintelligence

To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android. Early on, the software had the regrettable habit of hitting police cruisers. No one knew why, though Tesla's engineers had some good guesses: Stationary objects and flashing lights seemed to trick the A.I. The car would be driving along normally, the computer well in control, and suddenly it would veer to the right or left and -- smash -- at least 10 times in just over three years. For a company that depended on an unbounded sense of optimism among investors to maintain its high stock price -- Tesla was at one point worth more than Toyota, Honda, Volkswagen, Mercedes, BMW, Ford and General Motors combined -- these crashes might seem like a problem.