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minimally invasive surgery


Laser microrobot makes minimally invasive surgery more precise

Engadget

Minimally invasive surgery techniques have gone far over the past few decades, but they still have limitations that scientists are working to overcome. Laser micro surgery, for instance, leaves minimal peripheral tissue damage, but it can only be used on parts of the body within the laser's line of sight. Meanwhile, surgery using flexible robotics can access hard-to-reach areas, but they can damage surrounding tissue. Now, a team of robotic engineers from Harvard University's Wyss Institute have developed a way to bring their strengths together by designing a laser-steering microrobot that can be attached to a flexible surgical devices, such as colonoscopes. The team evaluated currently available laser devices and found that they're too big, don't have the range of motion needed or aren't powerful enough.


How a McKinsey co-designed robot is creating a better future for minimally invasive surgery

#artificialintelligence

February 12, 2020When German internist and surgeon Georg Kelling performed the first laparoscopic surgery in 1901, he likely hadn't envisioned that machines would one day follow in his footsteps. But today, robotic surgery is a health-care reality that promises certain benefits, like improved surgical precision that can contribute to quicker patient healing times. Still, widespread adoption of the technology has remained elusive. "The traditional approach to robotic surgery brings with it a lot of complexity and high cost," says Marcus Heneen, a design director at McKinsey Design. Today's surgical robots, Marcus explains, tend to situate the surgeon at a console in a non-sterile environment away from the patient.


The Operating Room of the Future

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The operating room is getting smarter, more effective--and a lot less risky for patients. Hospitals are investing in new devices, designs and digital technologies that promise a new era of innovation for surgery. The moves are part of a growing shift away from traditional open procedures that involve big incisions, lots of blood loss and long hospitalizations. They point toward a future where more patients can choose minimally invasive outpatient surgeries, with faster recoveries, fewer complications, and less pain and scarring. These new technologies cover a range of advances.


Self healing skin brings Terminator robots one step closer

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Cutting your hand, tearing a muscle, or even breaking a bone are all injuries that will heal over time. Now experts have created a synthetic skin that aims to mimic nature's self-repairing abilities, allowing robots to recover from'wounds' sustained while undertaking their duties. Further development of the technology could also allow Terminator-style killer robots, built for the battlefield, to repair the damage they sustain in combat. Cutting your hand, tearing a muscle, or even breaking a bone are all injuries that will heal over time. Now experts have created a synthetic skin (pictured on robotic hand) that aims to mimic nature's self-repairing abilities To create their synthetic flesh, the scientists used jelly-like polymers that melt into each together when heated and then cooled.


Health Checkup: Robotics - TIME

AITopics Original Links

If your idea of surgery comes mainly from TV-doctor dramas, you'll find this operating suite at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit a bit disorienting. There's a major surgery in progress that's what they tell you, anyway but you can't see a patient. For that matter, you can't see the surgeon. There must be a scalpel wielder here somewhere, but all you can see is people sitting at machines in near darkness. The largest of the machines is a weird behemoth in the center of the room, spiderlike, shrouded in plastic sleeves and protective drapery.


Machine Learning Approach for Skill Evaluation in Robotic-Assisted Surgery

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Evaluating surgeon skill has predominantly been a subjective task. Development of objective methods for surgical skill assessment are of increased interest. Recently, with technological advances such as robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery (RMIS), new opportunities for objective and automated assessment frameworks have arisen. In this paper, we applied machine learning methods to automatically evaluate performance of the surgeon in RMIS. Six important movement features were used in the evaluation including completion time, path length, depth perception, speed, smoothness and curvature. Different classification methods applied to discriminate expert and novice surgeons. We test our method on real surgical data for suturing task and compare the classification result with the ground truth data (obtained by manual labeling). The experimental results show that the proposed framework can classify surgical skill level with relatively high accuracy of 85.7%. This study demonstrates the ability of machine learning methods to automatically classify expert and novice surgeons using movement features for different RMIS tasks. Due to the simplicity and generalizability of the introduced classification method, it is easy to implement in existing trainers.


This hi-tech arm can slither down a patient's throat and perform surgery

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A snake-like robot could soon assist surgeons in the operating room. The flexible system is best suited for minimally invasive surgeries, and can slither down a patient's throat to reach typically hard to access areas. Equipped with a high-definition camera and a joystick controller, the Flex Robotic System allows surgeons to navigate non-linear regions of the anatomy and avoid obstacles. A snake-like robot could soon assist surgeons in the operating room. The flexible system is best suited for minimally invasive surgeries, and can slither down a patient's throat to reach typically hard to access areas The robotic OR assistant was first thought up in 2004 by Howie Choset, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute and co-founder of Medrobotics, Bloomberg reports.