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Committee on AI says EU has 'fallen behind' in global tech leadership race

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The EU needs to act as a'global standard-setter' in AI, according to a new report that also warned about the risks of mass surveillance. A new EU report says public debate on the use of artificial intelligence (AI) should focus on the technology's "enormous potential" to complement humans. The European Parliament's special committee on artificial intelligence in a digital age adopted its final recommendations yesterday (22 March) after 18 months of inquiries. The committee's draft text notes that the world is on the verge of "the fourth industrial revolution" from an abundance of data combined with powerful algorithms. But it adds that that the EU has "fallen behind" in the global race for tech leadership, which poses a risk that tech standards could be developed in the future by "non-democratic actors".


Artificial intelligence: the EU needs to act as a global standard-setter

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The adopted text says that the public debate on the use of artificial intelligence (AI) should focus on this technology's enormous potential to complement humans. The text warns that the EU has fallen behind in the global race for tech leadership. As a result, there is a risk that standards will be developed elsewhere in the future, often by non-democratic actors, while the EU needs to act as a global standard-setter in AI. MEPs identified policy options that could unlock AI's potential in health, the environment and climate change, to help combat pandemics and global hunger, as well as enhancing people's quality of life through personalised medicine. AI, if combined with the necessary support infrastructure, education and training, can increase capital and labour productivity, innovation, sustainable growth and job creation, they add.


Ethics of AI Surveillance Tech -- Conversation with Francesca Rossi

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This week, we launched our new series of interviews with brilliant women working in the critical space of AI Ethics and discuss their groundbreaking work. Our first 6 episodes are sponsored by IBM…


LORINC: Trying to police the way cops use AI-based investigation tools - Spacing Toronto

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Late last month, the Toronto Police Services Board released a new policy meant to guide the agency's future procurement and use of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies for law enforcement. The 4,800-word document, now posted on the TPSB's website, is the product of a fairly extensive canvas of public and expert opinion, and said to be the first such governance framework for any Canadian law enforcement agency. It consists of a general statement about guiding principles and an articulation of the policy's purpose, as well as 21 separate operational provisions divided into four broad categories: review and assessment of new AI technologies; board approval and reporting prior to procurement, utilization and deployment; monitoring and reporting; and continuous review. As with all matters policing, the board -- which consists of elected and appointed civilians -- sets the policy at a high level, while the chief of police is responsible for carrying it out and then reporting back to the TPSB on how things are going. On paper, an elegant arrangement, more often honoured in the breach than the observance, as the saying goes.


Global Agreement Defines The Ethics Of Artificial Intelligence – OpEd

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A historic agreement defines the common values and principles needed to ensure the healthy development of Artificial Intelligence (AI). All the member states of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) have signed the agreement. The importance of the agreement signed on November 23 is underlined by the fact that AI is pervasive and enables many of our daily routines--booking flights, steering driverless cars, and personalising our morning news feeds. AI also supports the decision-making of governments and the private sector. Artificial intelligence is present in everyday life, from booking flights and applying for loans to steering driverless cars.


A data 'black hole': Europol ordered to delete vast store of personal data

The Guardian

The EU's police agency, Europol, will be forced to delete much of a vast store of personal data that it has been found to have amassed unlawfully by the bloc's data protection watchdog. The unprecedented finding from the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) targets what privacy experts are calling a "big data ark" containing billions of points of information. Sensitive data in the ark has been drawn from crime reports, hacked from encrypted phone services and sampled from asylum seekers never involved in any crime. According to internal documents seen by the Guardian, Europol's cache contains at least 4 petabytes – equivalent to 3m CD-Roms or a fifth of the entire contents of the US Library of Congress. Data protection advocates say the volume of information held on Europol's systems amounts to mass surveillance and is a step on its road to becoming a European counterpart to the US National Security Agency (NSA), the organisation whose clandestine online spying was revealed by whistleblower Edward Snowden.


Provinces order Clearview AI to stop using facial recognition without consent

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Three provincial privacy watchdogs have ordered facial recognition company Clearview AI to stop collecting, using and disclosing images of people without consent. The privacy authorities of British Columbia, Alberta and Quebec are also requiring the U.S. firm to delete images and biometric data collected without permission from individuals. The binding orders made public Tuesday follow a joint investigation by the three provincial authorities with the office of federal privacy commissioner Daniel Therrien. The watchdogs found in February that Clearview AI's facial recognition technology resulted in mass surveillance of Canadians and violated federal and provincial laws governing personal information. They said the New York-based company's scraping of billions of images of people from across the internet to help police forces, financial institutions and other clients identify people was a clear breach of Canadians' privacy rights.


A look back at the Unesco recommendation establishing ethical rules for artificial intelligence - Actu IA

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Audrey Azoulay, Director-General of UNESCO, presented last week the first-ever global standard on the ethics of artificial intelligence, adopted by UNESCO's 193 Member States at the international organization's General Conference. UNESCO had highlighted back in November 2019 the need for regulatory frameworks at the national but also international level to ensure that innovative AI technologies can benefit all humanity. This recommendation, the result of the work of 24 international experts appointed on March 11, 2020, sets a global normative framework and gives its member states the responsibility to translate this framework at their level. Over the past decade, AI has experienced a considerable boom. Experts agree that humanity is on the threshold of a new era and that artificial intelligence will transform our lives in ways we cannot imagine.


193 countries adopt the first global agreement on the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence

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All the nations members of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) adopted on Thursday a historical text that defines the common values and principles needed to ensure the healthy development of AI. Artificial intelligence is present in everyday life, from booking flights and applying for loans to steering driverless cars. It is also used in specialized fields such as cancer screening or to help create inclusive environments for the disabled. According to UNESCO, AI is also supporting the decision-making of governments and the private sector, as well as helping combat global problems such as climate change and world hunger. However, the agency warns that the technology'is bringing unprecedented challenges'.


193 countries adopt the first global agreement on the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is present in everyday life, from booking flights and applying for loans to steering driverless cars. It is also used in specialized fields such as cancer screening or to help create inclusive environments for the disabled. According to UNESCO, AI is also supporting the decision-making of governments and the private sector, as well as helping combat global problems such as climate change and world hunger. However, the agency warns that the technology'is bringing unprecedented challenges'. "We see increased gender and ethnic bias, significant threats to privacy, dignity and agency, dangers of mass surveillance, and increased use of unreliable AI technologies in law enforcement, to name a few. Until now, there were no universal standards to provide an answer to these issues", UNESCO explained in a statement.