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marine transportation


Listen to AI Tries to Save the Whales

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"We head to the Pacific northwest to understand the obstacles that confront these endangered orcas and how researchers are using artificial intelligence to help orcas and humans to coexist. WHAT HAPPENED TO J thirty five or Tala wasn't an anomaly the southern resident cavs have been struggling to survive for some time they've been listed as endangered in both the US and Canada since the mid arts. But their numbers continue to fall in two, thousand five there were eight. Now there are just seventy two in the wild one lives in captivity. Their home waters in the sailor, see an elaborate network of channels that span the coasts of Seattle Vancouver from Olympia Washington in the south to the middle of Vancouver Island British Columbia in the north. The see encompasses puget sound the Strait of Georgia and the Strait of Juan De. Much of it is rich in natural beauty and teeming with wildlife with rural shorelines backlit by tall evergreens and craggy.


AI on the high seas: Digital transformation is revolutionizing global shipping

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In the era of automation and digital transformation, the shipping industry is undergoing dramatic changes to increase efficiency and safety at the port and on the high seas. From small boats to massive container ships, these seafaring vessels are integral components of the global economy. Maritime companies are developing the next generation of autonomous ships and leveraging artificial intelligence, machine learning, and more to design 21st-century smart ports. That said, inherent within digital transformation is of course the transformative process itself. Historically, some ports have relied on rather low-tech, manual solutions.


Uncharted Waters: Maritime Blazes a Trail with AI

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Whether shipping organizations work together with huge companies such as Microsoft and Google or one of the many new maritime startups (whose numbers have recently exploded with "more than $3.3 billion …invested in digital startups in the shipping and logistics sector") it appears that shipping is not just ripe for change anymore, it's changing. If you need more convincing, a recent Inmarsat survey of 125 global ship owners found that "ship owners are far more open to deploying IoT tools for analytic, management, and operational purposes than some other industries, including mining and agriculture" and "average expenditure per business on IoT based solutions will amount to $2.5 million over the next three years" while IDC tells us that "The DX (digital transformation) programs that will receive the most funding in 2018 are digital supply chain and logistics automation ($93 billion)". An industry that has often been described as "behind the times" is now proving itself to be quite the opposite. With this in mind, I ask several experts in shipping and maritime innovation and technology, representing both large organizations and startups, to share their thoughts on how they see AI impacting the shipping industry right now.


Global Big Data Conference

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Autonomous vessel software and systems provider Sea Machines Robotics today closed a $15 million funding round to accelerate deployment of its technologies in the unmanned naval boat and ship market. Sea Machines boldly claims this is one of the largest rounds for a tech company tackling marine and maritime use cases. Self-steering vessels aren't a new idea -- but they are gaining steam. Earlier this year, IBM and Promare -- a U.K.-based marine research and exploration charity -- trialed a prototype of an AI-powered maritime navigation system ahead of a September 6th venture to send a ship across the Atlantic Ocean. In Norway, a crewless cargo ship called the Yara Birkeland is expected to go into commercial operation later in 2020.


Sea Machines raises $15 million for autonomous ship navigation

#artificialintelligence

Autonomous vessel software and systems provider Sea Machines Robotics today closed a $15 million funding round to accelerate deployment of its technologies in the unmanned naval boat and ship market. Sea Machines boldly claims this is one of the largest rounds for a tech company tackling marine and maritime use cases. Self-steering vessels aren't a new idea -- but they are gaining steam. Earlier this year, IBM and Promare -- a U.K.-based marine research and exploration charity -- trialed a prototype of an AI-powered maritime navigation system ahead of a September 6th venture to send a ship across the Atlantic Ocean. In Norway, a crewless cargo ship called the Yara Birkeland is expected to go into commercial operation later in 2020.


Silverstream Wins Innovate UK KTP Grant To Advance Machine Learning In Maritime

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Silverstream Technologies, the leading air lubrication manufacturer for the shipping industry, in collaboration with the University of Southampton, has been awarded an Innovate UK Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) grant to advance machine learning in the maritime sector, the organisations have announced today. The two-year partnership will see an Associate of the University of Southampton, secured under the programme, work with Silverstream's Technical Team with the goal to advance machine learning and artificial intelligence within the Silverstream System's control and automation module. The Silverstream System uses air lubrication to reduce frictional resistance between a vessel's hull and the water and delivers fuel savings of 5-10% depending on the vessel and its operating profile. The KTP will aim to increase this saving by analysing operational data taken from installed systems. This data, when combined with cutting edge machine learning techniques, will help to further increase Silverstream System performance during a voyage, with the goal of gaining the theoretical maximum savings associated with the technology every time it is operating.


British treasure finders accused of piracy

Daily Mail - Science & tech

British archaeologists who discovered hundreds of artefacts from a cluster of 17th century shipwrecks in the Mediterranean Sea have had their cargo seized and been accused of an'illicit excavation'. Enigma Recoveries, which led an expedition into the Levantine Basin off the coast of Cyprus, found 12 shipwrecks filled with Chinese porcelain, jugs, coffee pots, peppercorns and illicit tobacco pipes. The ships and their priceless cargo, hailed as the'archaeological equivalent of finding a new planet' were recovered in ancient'shipping lanes' that served spice and silk trades from 300 BC onwards. But in a strongly-worded statement, the Cypriot government accused the company of being well known to both Cyprus and UNESCO for its'illicit underwater excavations' and its'violent extraction of objects causing destruction to their context'. Cyprus's Department of Antiquities accused the company of intending to sell the objects, as allegedly evident in documents filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (NASDAQ).


Optimizing Vessel Trajectory Compression

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In previous work we introduced a trajectory detection module that can provide summarized representations of vessel trajectories by consuming AIS positional messages online. This methodology can provide reliable trajectory synopses with little deviations from the original course by discarding at least 70% of the raw data as redundant. However, such trajectory compression is very sensitive to parametrization. In this paper, our goal is to fine-tune the selection of these parameter values. We take into account the type of each vessel in order to provide a suitable configuration that can yield improved trajectory synopses, both in terms of approximation error and compression ratio. Furthermore, we employ a genetic algorithm converging to a suitable configuration per vessel type. Our tests against a publicly available AIS dataset have shown that compression efficiency is comparable or even better than the one with default parametrization without resorting to a laborious data inspection.


12 shipwrecks uncovered in the east Med dating from 300 BC

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Archaeologists have found shipwrecks in the Mediterranean filled with hundreds of artefacts including Chinese porcelain, jugs, coffee pots, peppercorns and illicit tobacco pipes. A British-led expedition found a cluster of 12 ships on the sea bed, 1.2 miles below the surface of the Levantine Sea, using sophisticated robots. The ships were recovered in ancient'shipping lanes' that served spice and silk trades of the Greek, Roman and Ottoman empires, from 300 BC onwards. The ancient ships – including the biggest ever found in the Med – were unearthed in a muddy part of the eastern seabed between Cyprus and Lebanon, where remnants are often hard to find. The cluster of shipwrecks were found in the Levantine Basin in the east of the Mediterranean Sea.


How can ports use Artificial Intelligence? - Port Technology International

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The challenge of handling an ever increasing amount of cargo in a safe, efficient and environmentally friendly way is the biggest questions facing ports and wider maritime industry. Not only are more vessels calling at ports but those vessels are also getting bigger, along with the amount of data being created and stored. That data is a challenge in itself, as is finding the best ways to utilise it. Ports are more often than not looking to artificial intelligence (AI) as a way forward – but what is AI and how does it benefit ports? AI is transforming transportation at sea, on land and in the air.