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IoT Trends 2021: A Focus on Fundamentals, Not Nice-to-Haves

#artificialintelligence

As we approach the close of a whirlwind 2020, connected devices will continue to define numerous industries in the coming year. Several trends continue to gather momentum, fueling IoT's prominence in 2021, from data-intensive experiences that use Internet of Things (IoT) devices (such as self-driving cars or wearable devices) to basic health-and-safety needs as COVID-19 continues to take center stage. At the same time, the IoT landscape remains fragmented, with various prevailing standards, connectivity options and use cases abounding. This fragmentation will continue, predicted Forrester Research, and connectivity options will be diverse rather than standardized. While 5G has been touted as the holy grail for IoT, "there will be a variety of connectivity options," said Michele Pelino, senior analyst within the infrastructure and operations research team at Forrester.


Facebook using artificial intelligence to forecast COVID-19 spread in every U.S. county

#artificialintelligence

State officials hope California's new 10 p.m. stay-at-home order will slow the spread of COVID-19, otherwise, another 10,000 San Diegans are projected to contract the virus in the next 10 days. That's according to a new county-by-county forecast from Facebook, which rolled out the prediction software last month. Facebook projects L.A. County will see the second-largest increase in cases in the country by November 30. San Diego County is projected to add the 15th most cases, reaching a total of 78,594 infections by Nov. 30. The two-week forecast was released before Governor Gavin Newsom announced enhanced restrictions.


AI and automation vs. the COVID-19 pandemic: Trading liberty for safety

#artificialintelligence

Digital technologies have been touted as a solution to the COVID-19 outbreak since early in the pandemic. AlgorithmWatch, a non-profit research and advocacy organisation to evaluate and shed light on algorithmic decision making processes, just published a report on Automated Decision-Making Systems in the COVID-19 Pandemic, examining the use of technology to respond to COVID-19. From cancelled conferences to disrupted supply chains, not a corner of the global economy is immune to the spread of COVID-19. The report has a European lens, as AlgorithmWatch focuses on the use of digital technology in the EU. Its findings, however, are interesting and applicable regardless of geographies, as they refer to the same underlying principles and technologies.


AI and automation vs. the COVID-19 pandemic: Trading liberty for safety

ZDNet

Digital technologies have been touted as a solution to theCOVID-19 outbreak since early in the pandemic. AlgorithmWatch, a non-profit research and advocacy organisation to evaluate and shed light on algorithmic decision making processes, just published a report on Automated Decision-Making Systems in the COVID-19 Pandemic, examining the use of technology to respond to COVID-19. From cancelled conferences to disrupted supply chains, not a corner of the global economy is immune to the spread of COVID-19. The report has a European lens, as AlgorithmWatch focuses on the use of digital technology in the EU. Its findings, however, are interesting and applicable regardless of geographies, as they refer to the same underlying principles and technologies.


RoadCloud to Offer Premium Road Data on the HERE Marketplace

#artificialintelligence

RoadCloud, the connected vehicle data platform that provides real-time information for transportation services and systems, and HERE Technologies, a leading location data and technology platform, announced that they have teamed up to make RoadCloud road friction estimates, road condition data and weather data available via the HERE Marketplace. As a global location data exchange hub, the HERE Marketplace enables RoadCloud to benefit from its global reach across industries and ecosystems and help the company to broaden its total addressable market and revenue opportunities. By equipping commercial vehicle fleets with high-fidelity sensors, RoadCloud continuously collects high quality data on the state of the entire road network, including road pavement quality, black ice and potential aquaplaning scenarios. Its optical sensor (infra-red spectrometer and cloud-side calibration) can also collect information on water depth on the road and provide a continuous road friction coefficient. RoadCloud data helps OEMs to increase the safety of their Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and accelerate autonomous vehicle development by providing an accurate view of the road conditions'behind the next curve'. It also helps smart cities and road authorities maintain roads up to 20% more efficiently and with a 15% lower impact on the environment in both summer and winteri.


Spatial Privacy Pricing: The Interplay between Privacy, Utility and Price in Geo-Marketplaces

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

A geo-marketplace allows users to be paid for their location data. Users concerned about privacy may want to charge more for data that pinpoints their location accurately, but may charge less for data that is more vague. A buyer would prefer to minimize data costs, but may have to spend more to get the necessary level of accuracy. We call this interplay between privacy, utility, and price \emph{spatial privacy pricing}. We formalize the issues mathematically with an example problem of a buyer deciding whether or not to open a restaurant by purchasing location data to determine if the potential number of customers is sufficient to open. The problem is expressed as a sequential decision making problem, where the buyer first makes a series of decisions about which data to buy and concludes with a decision about opening the restaurant or not. We present two algorithms to solve this problem, including experiments that show they perform better than baselines.


Global Big Data Conference

#artificialintelligence

StreetLight Data, a big data platform that helps cities unlock mobility insights from location data from smartphone apps, has raised $15 million in a series D round of funding. The raise comes as cities around the world are having to adapt to social distancing measures that require shifts in transportation -- bikes over buses, for example. Founded in 2012, San Francisco-based StreetLight Data works with an aggregator called Cuebiq, which collects anonymized location data from hundreds of apps, including weather and dating apps, installed on millions of smartphones in North America. Cuebiq packages this inside an SDK that can be used by third-party platforms to create new apps and services. StreetLight Data applies its machine learning algorithms to this data to figure out things like how people travel through cities, what transportation they use, and which times and days are busiest.


Geospatial 2.0: AI, IoT & The Incredible Possibilities

#artificialintelligence

Geospatial 2.0 categorizes and describes the popular adoption and use of geospatial data and related technology. It helps separate the older, GIS-centred Geospatial 1.0 world, from what is an emerging, much larger sector. I've written a number of article on Geospatial 2.0. In this post my goal is to provide more focus. To propose a more concrete definition of Geospatial 2.0, and provide some use cases to help colour the picture.


Demographic report on protests shows how much info our phones give away

Engadget

If you marched in recent Black Lives Matter protests in Atlanta, Los Angeles, Minneapolis or New York, there's a chance the mobile analytics company Mobilewalla gleaned demographic data from your cellphone use. Last week, Mobilewalla released a report detailing the race, age and gender breakdowns of individuals who participated in protests in those cities during the weekend of May 29th. What is especially disturbing is that protestors likely had no idea that the tech company was using location data harvested from their devices. As BuzzFeed News explains, Mobilewalla buys data from sources like advertisers, data brokers and ISPs. It uses AI to predict a person's demographics (race, age, gender, zip code, etc.) based on location data, device IDs and browser histories.


The Apple-Google Contact Tracing System Won't Work. It Still Deserves Praise.

Slate

This article is part of Privacy in the Pandemic, a Future Tense series. In debates over digital privacy, American tech companies are often branded as the villains, with European policymakers cast in the role of savior. Big Tech is out to steal your privacy, but European governments are stepping in to protect it. Or so the narrative goes. But the new exposure notification system released by Google and Apple on Wednesday has turned these roles on their head, albeit in ways that at least some public health authorities say will make their job more difficult.