life sciences


Zipline Expands Its Medical Delivery Drones Across East Africa

IEEE Spectrum

While companies like Amazon pour considerable resources into finding ways of using drones to deliver such things as shoes and dog treats, Zipline has been saving lives in Rwanda since October 2016 with drones that deliver blood. Zipline's autonomous fixed-wing drones now form an integral part of Rwanda's medical-supply infrastructure, transporting blood products from a central distribution center to hospitals across the country. And in 2018, Zipline's East African operations will expand to include Tanzania, a much larger country. Delivering critical medical supplies in this region typically involves someone spending hours (or even days) driving a cooler full of life-saving medicine or blood along windy dirt roads. Such deliveries can become dangerous or even impossible to make if roads and bridges get washed out.


Big Data and AI- Are They Good For Life Sciences

@machinelearnbot

Over the years, financial industries have had a long track record of managing data and applying analytics to optimizing customer relationships and developing new services. Fortunately more and more life science companies have begun to fully embrace as well as seize upon the opportunities to organize and apply their data in a systematic way, be it drug development or patient care challenges. Big data has taken off in a big way. Now, most organizations irrespective of the industry grapple with quintillions of bytes of data every day. They try hard when it comes to figure out an information management strategy that could accelerate the flow of insights.


Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Life Sciences

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In a new report, Silicon Valley Bank analyzed the venture investment and sector trends for digital health companies that use artificial intelligence (AI). Artificial intelligence is revolutionizing how the healthcare industry delivers patient care in a value-based environment and how the life science industry creates novel medical products. Venture investment in digital health AI companies has doubled in the past two years. Based on historical trends for other disruptive technologies, this momentum is expected to continue. Download the report to learn more.


Digital healthcare accelerator offers £68k to machine learning, AI start-ups

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Artificial intelligence (AI) start-ups will be given the opportunity to receive up to £68,000 in funding as part of the 2018 Velocity Health programme. Velocity Health is an accelerator programme spear-headed by global healthcare firm Merck Sharp & Dohme (MSD) and Wayra UK, the accelerator platform owned by Telefónica. It was set up in 2015 and targets start-ups working to meet the challenges facing the NHS. This year, MSD and Wayra UK are seeking firms using machine learning and AI to support disease and illness prevention. Two companies will be offered a maximum of £68,000 each in funding and "acceleration services".


Velocity Health puts £68k up for grabs to machine learning, AI start-ups

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) start-ups will be given the opportunity to receive up to £68,000 in funding as part of the 2018 Velocity Health programme. Velocity Health is an accelerator programme spear-headed by global Global healthcare firm Merck Sharp & Dohme (MSD) and Wayra UK, the accelerator platform owned by Telefónica. It was set up in 2015 and targets start-ups working to meet the challenges facing the NHS. This year, MSD and Wayra UK are seeking firms using machine learning and AI to support disease and illness prevention. Two companies will be offered a maximum of £68,000 each in funding and "acceleration services".


Artificial Intelligence Euphoria in Healthcare - DMI

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Artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), deep learning and cognitive computing are just a few of the hot buzzwords that are engulfing every industry whether that be manufacturing, finance, or healthcare. In fact, Gartner's 2016 hype cycle for emerging technologies puts machine learning at the peak of inflated expectations. Regardless of what people have to say about AI, one thing is clear: it is here to stay and has the potential to transform several aspects of the "human ecosystem". The healthcare industry is not immune to this hype. In fact, I believe that AI has a major role to play in transforming the entire industry in a significant way.


U.S. CEOs See Greater Willingness To Use Artificial Intelligence: KPMG Survey

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More than two-thirds of U.S. life sciences CEOs say their organizations are ready to adopt advanced artificial intelligence technology, but they acknowledge there are barriers – such as skills, complexity and costs – to implementing it, the KPMG's 2017 CEO Outlook found. KPMG's survey also found that more than 90 percent of CEOs were forecasting annual revenue growth of less than 5 percent for the next three years, reflecting less optimism than the 2016 survey. The level of readiness among U.S. life sciences companies -- with 68 percent of CEOs saying they are prepared for artificial intelligence – exceeds the 22 percent from Asian-Pacific companies and 47 percent of European organizations whose leaders expressed that their organizations were ready. Two-thirds of U.S. executives at the largest pharma and medical device makers were also concerned about integrating this emerging technology into business processes. The biggest barriers to implementing new technologies were the lack of internal skills/knowledge (35 percent) and the complexity of implementations (16 percent), followed by the lack of budget (14 percent), according to the 43 CEOS of the largest U.S. life sciences companies who were surveyed.


Why open source should drive AI development in Life Sciences - OpenText Blogs

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We stand on the verge of a revolution in Life Sciences. Artificial Intelligence (AI) has the power to change everything. It can handle the vast amounts of data being created, continuously learn even as it's exposed to more data and deliver actionable insights for better decision-making. There is little doubt that the next few years are going to bring some incredible developments to the sector. How best do we get there?


AI's potential in the pharma life cycle - PMLiVE

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From the acceleration of regulatory submissions - by identifying data gaps that have led to delays or rejections in the past - to the transformation of the conduct of clinical trials and patient safety monitoring, artificial intelligence (AI) has substantial potential to change the way life sciences organisations operate. Back-end technology already exists to facilitate more intelligent and proactive health monitoring by taking things forward as drug companies rely on finding the optimum ways for patients to interact with and use the tools. There is also important safety monitoring potential and drug feedback potential, as long as intelligent tools based on AI and machine learning are in the background offering companies what to look for and ways of deciphering what it all means. As more and more companies identify opportunities to turn AI-enabled insights into timely and beneficial outcomes - whether by accelerating market entry, successfully mining social media for potential adverse events and other patient feedback, discovering new indications, or improving the manufacturing and supply chain process - advanced automation through increased machine intelligence looks set to be the way forward.


Why 500 Million People in China Are Talking to This AI

MIT Technology Review

Some also use it to send text messages through voice commands while driving, or to communicate with a speaker of another Chinese dialect. But while some impressive progress in voice recognition and instant translation has enabled Xu to talk with his Canadian tenant, language understanding and translation for machines remains an incredibly challenging task (see "AI's Language Problem"). In August, iFlytek launched a voice assistant for drivers called Xiaofeiyu (Little Flying Fish). Min Chu, the vice president of AISpeech, another Chinese company working on voice-based human-computer interaction technologies, says voice assistants for drivers are in some ways more promising than smart speakers and virtual assistants embedded in smartphones.