jupyter notebook


rasbt/python-machine-learning-book-2nd-edition

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Helpful installation and setup instructions can be found in the README.md To access the code materials for a given chapter, simply click on the open dir links next to the chapter headlines to navigate to the chapter subdirectories located in the code/ subdirectory. You can also click on the ipynb links below to open and view the Jupyter notebook of each chapter directly on GitHub. In addition, the code/ subdirectories also contain .py However, I highly recommend working with the Jupyter notebook if possible in your computing environment.


Developing artificial intelligence tools for all

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For all of the hype about artificial intelligence (AI), most software is still geared toward engineers. To demystify AI and unlock its benefits, the MIT Quest for Intelligence created the Quest Bridge to bring new intelligence tools and ideas into classrooms, labs, and homes. This spring, more than a dozen Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) students joined the project in its mission to make AI accessible to all. Undergraduates worked on applications designed to teach kids about AI, improve access to AI programs and infrastructure, and harness AI to improve literacy and mental health. Six projects are highlighted here.


sabiha90/Random-Forest-Explainability-Pipeline

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This toolkit serves to execute RFEX 2.0 "pipeline" e.g. a set of steps to produce information which comprises RFEX 2.0 summary namely information to enhance explainability of Random Forest classifier. It comes with the synthetically generated test database which helps to demonstrate how RFEX 2.0 works. Wth this toolkit users can also use their own data to generate RFEX 2.0 summary. Background of the RFEX 2.0 method, as well as the description and access to the synthetic test database convenient to test and demonstrate can be found in TR 18.01 at cs.sfsu.edu Users are strongly advised to read the above report before using this toolkit.



How to Decide Between Amazon SageMaker and Microsoft Azure Machine Learning Studio

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But there are other tools that also claim to make machine learning easier and speed model development. I am wondering how they compare? So, this week, I am taking a look at Amazon SageMaker (SageMaker) and how it compares to Studio. What I found when I looked at SageMaker in comparison to Studio is a significantly different approach to model building. The vendors of each tool would both claim to offer a fully managed service that covers the entire machine learning workflow to build, train, and deploy machine learning models quickly.


How to Decide Between Amazon SageMaker and Microsoft Azure Machine Learning Studio

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But there are other tools that also claim to make machine learning easier and speed model development. I am wondering how they compare? So, this week, I am taking a look at Amazon SageMaker (SageMaker) and how it compares to Studio. What I found when I looked at SageMaker in comparison to Studio is a significantly different approach to model building. The vendors of each tool would both claim to offer a fully managed service that covers the entire machine learning workflow to build, train, and deploy machine learning models quickly.


Build your own Robust Deep Learning Environment in Minutes

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Thanks to cheaper and bigger storage we have more data than what we had a couple of years back. We do owe our thanks to Big Data no matter how much hype it has created. However, the real MVP here is faster and better computing,which made papers from the 1980s and 90s more relevant (LSTMs were actually invented in 1997)! We are finally able to leverage the true power of neural networks and deep learning thanks to better and faster CPUs and GPUs. Whether we like it or not, traditional statistical and machine learning models have severe limitations on problems with high-dimensionality, unstructured data, more complexity and large volumes of data.


13 Free Sites to Get an Introduction to Machine Learning

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Its one of those buzzwords that we've all heard whether we're programmers or not: machine learning. Unlike other trends in the past, machine learning isn't a fad, it really is the future. As AIs become more and more sophisticated, programmers need to get up to speed on what it is, how it works, and the latest trends in the field. Fortunately, these 13 free resources offer an excellent introduction to machine learning so you can get started with some basic machine learning tutorials right away. Before you begin to study the machine learning basics, make sure you're familiar with the python scripting language.


Performing Classification in TensorFlow – Towards Data Science

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In this article, I will explain how to perform classification using TensorFlow library in Python. We'll be working with the California Census Data and will try to use various features of individuals to predict what class of income they belong in ( 50k or 50k). The data can be accessed at my GitHub profile in the TensorFlow repository. Here is the link to access the data. Let's begin by importing the necessary libraries and the dataset into our Jupyter Notebook.


Machine Learning With Python, Jupyter, KSQL, and TensorFlow - DZone AI

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Uber expanded Michelangelo "to serve any kind of Python model from any source to support other Machine Learning and Deep Learning frameworks like PyTorch and TensorFlow [instead of just using Spark for everything]." So why did Uber (and many other tech companies) build its own platform and framework-independent machine learning infrastructure? The posts How to Build and Deploy Scalable Machine Learning in Production with Apache Kafka and Using Apache Kafka to Drive Cutting-Edge Machine Learning describe the benefits of leveraging the Apache Kafka ecosystem as a central, scalable, and mission-critical nervous system. It allows real-time data ingestion, processing, model deployment, and monitoring in a reliable and scalable way. This post focuses on how the Kafka ecosystem can help solve the impedance mismatch between data scientists, data engineers, and production engineers. By leveraging it to build your own scalable machine learning infrastructure and also make your data scientists happy, you can solve the same problems for which Uber built its own ML platform, Michelangelo. Based on what I've seen in the field, an impedance mismatch between data scientists, data engineers, and production engineers is the main reason why companies struggle to bring analytic models into production to add business value.