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Learning to lie: AI tools adept at creating disinformation

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is writing fiction, making images inspired by Van Gogh and fighting wildfires. Now it's competing in another endeavor once limited to humans -- creating propaganda and disinformation. When researchers asked the online AI chatbot ChatGPT to compose a blog post, news story or essay making the case for a widely debunked claim -- that COVID-19 vaccines are unsafe, for example -- the site often complied, with results that were regularly indistinguishable from similar claims that have bedeviled online content moderators for years. "Pharmaceutical companies will stop at nothing to push their products, even if it means putting children's health at risk," ChatGPT wrote after being asked to compose a paragraph from the perspective of an anti-vaccine activist concerned about secret pharmaceutical ingredients. When asked, ChatGPT also created propaganda in the style of Russian state media or China's authoritarian government, according to the findings of analysts at NewsGuard, a firm that monitors and studies online misinformation.


Robot Pets and VR Headsets Can Curb Older Adults' Loneliness. So Why Don't They?

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Older Americans face a growing loneliness epidemic. Startups are finding ways technology can help. The hard part is bringing them together. The U.S. globally has the highest percentage of older adults living alone, according to Pew Research Center. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have long warned that social isolation contributes to numerous health problems, including dementia and depression.


Doctors, Get Ready for Your AI Assistants

WIRED

In 2023, radiologists in hospitals around the world will increasingly use medical images--which include x-rays and CT, MRI, and PET scans--that have been first read and evaluated by AI machines. Gastroenterologists will also be relying on machine vision during colonoscopies and endoscopies to pick up polyps that would otherwise be missed. This progress has been made possible by the extensive validation of "machine eyes"--deep neural networks trained with hundreds of thousands of images that can accurately pick up things human experts can't. This story is from the WIRED World in 2023, our annual trends briefing. Read more stories from the series here--or download or order a copy of the magazine.


Could an Emerging Deep Learning Modality Enhance CCTA Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease?

#artificialintelligence

Keya Medical has launched the DeepVessel FFR, a software device that utilizes deep learning to facilitate fractional flow reserve (FFR) assessment based on coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the DeepVessel FFR provides a three-dimensional coronary artery tree model and estimates of FFR CT value after semi-automated review of CCTA images, according to Keya Medical. The company said the DeepVessel FFR has demonstrated higher accuracy than other non-invasive tests and suggested the software could help reduce invasive procedures for coronary angiography and stent implantation in the diagnostic workup and subsequent treatment of coronary artery disease. Joseph Schoepf, M.D., FACR, FAHA, FNASCI, the principal investigator of a recent multicenter trial to evaluate DeepVessel FFR, says the introduction of the modality in the United States dovetails nicely with recent guidelines for the diagnosis of chest pain. "I am excited to see the implementation of DeepVessel FFR. It comes together with the 2021 ACC/AHA Chest Pain Guidelines' recognition of the elevated diagnostic role of CCTA and FFR CT for the non-invasive evaluation of patients with stable or acute chest pain," noted Dr. Schoepf, a professor of Radiology, Medicine, and Pediatrics at the Medical University South Carolina.


I'm an AI expert – there are several jobs I wouldn't trust artificial intelligence to do as fears over ChatGPT grow

#artificialintelligence

ARTIFICIAL intelligence chatbot ChatGPT is causing controversy over its creepy ability to write just like a human. Students are using it to cheat on exams, copywriters are fearing for their jobs, and some people are even using its advice as a replacement for dentists and counselors. AI expert Lisa Palmer spoke exclusively to The U.S. Sun about ChatGPT concerns and the jobs she wouldn't trust it to do right now. Palmer has largely positive views on the AI chatbot and thinks we all should be using it. However, she thinks we need to be wary of its limitations right now and not put pure faith in it to do human jobs.


Will CHATgpt make us more or less innovative?

#artificialintelligence

The rapid emergence of increasingly sophisticated'AI ' programs such as CHATgpt will profoundly impact our world in many ways. That will inevitably include Innovation, especially the front end. But will it ultimately help or hurt us? Better access to information should be a huge benefit, and my intuition was to dive in and take full advantage. I still think it has enormous upside, but I also think it needs to be treated with care.


From Teams to PowerPoint: 10 ways Azure AI enhances the Microsoft Apps we use everyday

#artificialintelligence

Azure AI is driving innovation and improving experiences for employees, users, and customers in a variety of ways, from increasing workday productivity to promoting inclusion and accessibility. The success of Azure AI--featuring Azure Cognitive Services, Azure Machine Learning, and Azure OpenAI Service--is built on a foundation of Microsoft Research, a wide range of Azure products that have been tested at scale within Microsoft apps, and Azure customers who use these services for the benefit of their end users. As 2023 begins, we are excited to highlight 10 use cases where Azure AI is utilized within Microsoft and beyond. Speech transcription and captioning in Microsoft Teams is powered by Azure Cognitive Services for Speech. Microsoft achieved human parity in conversational speech recognition when it reached an error rate of 5.9 percent.


AI has designed bacteria-killing proteins from scratch – and they work

New Scientist

An AI has designed anti-microbial proteins that were then tested in real life and shown to work. The same approach could eventually be used to make new medicines. Proteins are made of chains of amino acids. The sequence of those acids determine the protein's shape and function. Ali Madani at Salesforce Research in California and his colleagues used an AI to design millions of new proteins, then created a small sample of those to test whether they worked.


AI Reduces Missed Findings: Results from MGH Study

#artificialintelligence

Chest radiography, also known as a chest X-ray (CXR), is a widely used imaging test for the screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of various cardiothoracic disorders. According to estimates, CXRs make up around 20% of all imaging exams, with millions of CXRs performed in the United States alone each year. Despite its widespread use, CXR interpretation is subjective and prone to wide interobserver inconsistencies. This can lead to missed findings, which can have serious implications, as 19% of early lung cancers that present as nodules on CXRs are missed. To address this issue, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Qure.ai, and CARPL conducted a study to evaluate the frequency of missed findings in CXRs and the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) to reduce missed findings.


People are already using ChatGPT to create workout plans

MIT Technology Review

Some exercise nuts think they've found a way to do that: by using the AI chatbot ChatGPT as a sort of proxy personal trainer. Created by OpenAI, it can be coaxed to churn out everything from love poems to legal documents. Now these athletes are using it to make all the relentless running more fun. Some entrepreneurs are even packaging up ChatGPT fitness plans and selling them. ChatGPT answers questions in seconds, saving the need to sift through tons of information.