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Elementary

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IT IS a nice coincidence that IBM's greatest boss and Sherlock Holmes's sidekick shared a surname. But whether it was Thomas J. or Dr John H. who inspired the name of the firm's latest venture into artificial intelligence (AI), the association of that name with a touch of genius makes "Watson" a clever choice. This sense of cleverness was reinforced in 2011, when Watson won a specially staged version of an American TV quiz show called "Jeopardy!" The system's capacity to parse questions posed to it in the show's convoluted, pun-ridden English, to search huge natural-language databases for clues, to synthesise those clues into answers and to frame those answers in a conversational way was able to beat to the draw the finest minds of American quizdom. Winning game-show prizes, though, is not a good enough business model to justify the investment it takes to build such a system.


Microsoft to buy AI and speech tech company Nuance for €16bn

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Microsoft said on Monday it would buy artificial intelligence and speech technology firm Nuance Communications for about $16 billion (€13.43 billion) in cash, as it builds out its cloud strategy for healthcare. The deal comes as both companies, which partnered in 2019 to automate clinical administrative work such as documentation, gain from a boom in telehealth services with medical consultations shifting online due to the Covid-19 pandemic. "Nuance provides the AI layer at the healthcare point of delivery," Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella said in a statement, adding "AI is technology's most important priority, and healthcare is its most urgent application." Microsoft's offer of $56 per share represents a premium of 22.86 per cent to Nuance's last close. Shares of Nuance rose nearly 23 per cent in pre-market trading.


What's AI doing in make-up?

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For Bengaluru resident Srishti Shekhar, the stay-at-home situation and her last year of school made her try something she had never done before: online consultation to solve her acne issues. "I had been to two dermatologists before coming across Remedico's service on Instagram. The sign-up process was very easy and all I had to do was send a few photos and I had a treatment plan designed for me within a day," says Shekhar. Like Shekhar, thousands of Indians turned to the internet when going to a clinic seemed risky. By September, the number of internet subscribers in India had risen to 776.45 million, up from 718.74 million in December 2019--474.11


How The Big Four Dodged Pandemic And Made Record Earnings

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"The big tech is banking heavily on AI, Cloud and 5G technologies to retain customers and drive growth" A global emergency can smother your business, government lawsuits can break your company, competitors with trillion-dollar market value can wipe your organisation off the map. But what would happen when all three come together in the same year? The pandemic brought the world to a standstill. The internet giants, however, came out of it unscathed. Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook, popularly known as the big four, have not only survived a combination of calamities but registered profits and left the Wall Street analysts dumbfounded.


Switzerland constructs the world's fastest AI supercomputer

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Tokyo (SCCIJ) – Switzerland is building the world's most powerful supercomputer focused on artificial intelligence. The "Alps" system is designed for researchers and will come online 2023 as scheduled despite the COVID-19 pandemic. The Swiss National Supercomputing Center (CSCS) is partnering with Hewlett Packard and Nvidia to combine classic supercomputing and AI technologies for superior performance. Switzerland's new supercomputer increases the speed of data processing for AI applications significantly ( CSCS). The new data center will replace CSCS's existing Piz Daint supercomputer and serve as a general-purpose system open to the broad community of researchers in Switzerland and the rest of the world.


6 AI Myths Debunked

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"Artificial intelligence (AI)I will automate everything and put people out of work." "AI is a science-fiction technology." "Robots will take over the world." The hype around AI has produced many myths, in mainstream media, in board meetings and across organizations. Some worry about an "almighty" AI that will take over the world, and some think that AI is nothing more than a buzzword.


How Transport for NSW is tapping machine learning

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At the peak of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020, Australian transport agency Transport for New South Wales (NSW) had to restore public confidence in the state's transportation network and curb the spread of the disease. One of the ways it did that was to analyse the travel history recorded by Opal transit cards – with an individual's permission – and inform the commuter if the regular buses and train services that they had been taking were Covid-safe. Chris Bennetts, executive director for digital product delivery at Transport for NSW, said those insights were derived using a machine learning model that predicts how full a bus or train carriage was going to be at a given time. Based on the predictions, commuters would be advised if they could continue using their regular services or switch to a different service or mode of transport. "That was interesting for us because it was our first foray into personalisation to offer more choices for customers," said Bennetts.


Understanding the differences between biological and computer vision

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Welcome to AI book reviews, a series of posts that explore the latest literature on artificial intelligence. Since the early years of artificial intelligence, scientists have dreamed of creating computers that can "see" the world. As vision plays a key role in many things we do every day, cracking the code of computer vision seemed to be one of the major steps toward developing artificial general intelligence. But like many other goals in AI, computer vision has proven to be easier said than done. In 1966, scientists at MIT launched "The Summer Vision Project," a two-month effort to create a computer system that could identify objects and background areas in images.


Why your big data dreams can't come true without AI - Information Age

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During the Covid-19 pandemic, the volume of data generated by online activity has increased by 35%. This isn't surprising, for during the same period of time, the rate of digital transformation – which includes cloud adoption – at the average enterprise, has accelerated by seven years. With more consumers online than ever before, companies are rushing to better integrate and process data, so they can more accurately anticipate changing preferences and patterns of consumption. At the same time, however, companies are also searching for ways to keep this big data – much of it personal and sensitive – safe. Now that millions more people are working from home, data is being transferred through the cloud and across public and private networks in unprecedented volumes.


Artificial Intelligence at Johnson & Johnson - Current Investments

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We see evidence dating back to 2017 that Johnson & Johnson has been regularly publishing about their investments and initiatives related to artificial intelligence. At present, Johnson & Johnson does not seem to boast any mature, deployed applications with the firm itself, but its AI-related investment initiatives indicate their aspirations. According to an analysis by FiercePharma, Johnson & Johnson (J&J) is the largest pharmaceutical firm by revenue, bringing in $82.1 billion in 2019. However, its pharma group has seen the lions' share of J&J's success, outperforming its other units with notable sales expansion in oncology and immunology. J&J claims to be investing in data science competency throughout the firm.