hanson robotic


Should robots ever look like us?

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Humanoid robots are a familiar trope in popular culture, but is making machines look like us a little bit creepy and even potentially dangerous? Whether it is Isaac Asimov's robotics novels, 1980s movie character Johnny 5, Hollywood's Avengers: The Age of Ultron or Channel 4's sci-fi drama Humans, there has long been a fascination in popular culture with robots becoming sentient - beings that can experience feelings and human-like consciousness. But how realistic - and desirable - is the prospect of robots that become almost indistinguishable from humans? Dr Ben Goertzel, who developed the AI software for Sophia, a social humanoid robot made by Hong Kong-based Hanson Robotics, believes robots should look like humans to help "break down suspicions and reservations people might have" about interacting with them. "You will have humanoid robots because people like them," he tells the BBC.


Hanson Robotics Limited Partners with Embody Digital to Advance Social Robot Communication Skills - Hanson Robotics

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About Hanson Robotics Limited Hanson Robotics is an AI and robotics company dedicated to creating living, intelligent machines that enrich people's lives. The company develops renowned robot characters, such as Sophia, the world's first robot citizen, which serve as AI platforms for scientific research, education, healthcare, sales and service, entertainment, and other research and service applications. Hanson Robotics' scientists, artists, roboticists, and engineers strive to bring robots to life as true friends who deeply understand and care for people, and collaborate with us in pursuit of ever-greater good for all. For more information please visit www.hansonrobotics.com.


iTutorGroup and Hanson Robotics Creating the Future of Education with AI - Hanson Robotics

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On Feb 27, 2019 at the "New Era, New Education, and Creating the Future" conference in Shanghai organized by the iTutorGroup, announced that Sophia the Robot is their new ambassador and future AI tutor. A new strategic partnership with Hanson Robotics was also announced at the same time. At the "New Era, New Education, and Creating the Future" conference, CEO Dr. Eric Yang delivered these key messages: Conference attendees included a group of teachers and students from a primary school that iTutorGroup donated RMB 500,000. Toby, one of the iTutorGroup's students and recent speech contest winner, appeared on stage and had a fun chat with Sophia. Founded in 1998, and led by Dr. Eric Yang, Founder, Chairman, and CEO, the iTutorGroup offers a range of e-learning solutions for adults and K-12 including TutorABC, vipJr, vipABC, TutorJr and TutorMing.


You have no idea what artificial intelligence really does

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WHEN SOPHIA THE ROBOT first switched on, the world couldn't get enough. It had a cheery personality, it joked with late-night hosts, it had facial expressions that echoed our own. Here it was, finally -- a robot plucked straight out of science fiction, the closest thing to true artificial intelligence that we had ever seen. There's no doubt that Sophia is an impressive piece of engineering. It didn't take much to convince people of Sophia's apparent humanity -- many of Futurism's own articles refer to the robot as "her."


Do Robots Deserve Legal Rights?

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Saudi Arabia made waves in late 2017 when it granted citizenship to a humanoid robot named Sophia, developed by the Hong Kong-based Hanson Robotics. What those rights technically include, and what the move might mean for other robots worldwide, remains unclear. But the robot itself wasted no time in taking advantage of her new, high profile to campaign for women's rights in her adopted country. This would be the same Sophia that, in a CNBC interview with her creator, Dr. David Hanson, said that she would "destroy all humans." So, granting legal rights to robots clearly remains a complicated subject, even if it is done primarily as a PR stunt to promote an IT conference, as was the case in Saudi Arabia.


Mama Mia It's Sophia: A Show Robot Or Dangerous Platform To Mislead?

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A collective eyebrow was raised by the AI and robotics community when the robot Sophia was given Saudia citizenship in 2017 The AI sharks were already circling as Sophia's fame spread with worldwide media attention. Were they just jealous buzz-kills or is something deeper going on? Sophia is not the first show robot to attain celebrity status. Yet accusations of hype and deception have proliferated about the misrepresentation of AI to public and policymakers alike. In an AI-hungry world where decisions about the application of the technologies will impact significantly on our lives, Sophia's creators may have crossed a line.


AI Humanoid 'Sophia' Is Granted First Ever Robot Visa, Speaks With President

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The AI humanoid, 'Sophia' (see above), has been making a worldwide tour on behalf of her creator, Hanson Robotics of Hong Kong, and made an unexpected stop to the Caucasus this week. The Caucasus stop meant granting the world's first ever visa granted to a robot, a process that took just two minutes thanks to some smart technology. Sophia's visit was organized by UN public service award winner ASAN (Azerbaijan Service and Assessment Network) xidmet, a government agency in Azerbaijan; which has been reducing the bureaucracy by creating one-stop centres for delivering services to the public. The agency recently took over all the country's e-government initiatives - no mean feat although in Azerbaijani, the word "asan" means easy. To underscore its electronic kinship with Sophia, and its prowess at delivering e-government services, ASAN issued her an electronic visa upon her arrival at Baku International Airport in the nation's capital.


How the blockchain could break Big Tech's hold on AI

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Pairing artificial intelligence and the blockchain might be what you would expect from a scammer looking to make a quick buck in 2018. The two concepts, after all, are two of the most buzzed about and least understood ideas in the tech universe. And the blockchain, the database design introduced by bitcoin, has lately been the most popular route for anyone looking to raise money for an idea that sounds too good to be true. Despite how easy the combination is to mock, the idea of applying the blockchain to AI is attracting a growing roster of serious entrepreneurs and venture capitalists, many of them with impressive academic credentials. Dawn Song, a computer science professor at UC Berkeley, and Ben Goertzel, the chief scientist at Hanson Robotics, have been among the big names arguing that the blockchain could be a crucial way to push back against some of the most worrying trends facing the field of artificial intelligence.


You have no idea what artificial intelligence really does

#artificialintelligence

WHEN SOPHIA THE ROBOT first switched on, the world couldn't get enough. It had a cheery personality, it joked with late-night hosts, it had facial expressions that echoed our own. Here it was, finally -- a robot plucked straight out of science fiction, the closest thing to true artificial intelligence that we had ever seen. There's no doubt that Sophia is an impressive piece of engineering. It didn't take much to convince people of Sophia's apparent humanity -- many of Futurism's own articles refer to the robot as "her."


Hackers expose frailty of robots

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At 4ft-nothing, with orb-like eyes, SoftBank's humanoid robot, Pepper, is designed to look friendly. But imagine if Pepper -- a powerful machine crammed with cameras, sensors and motors -- hurtled towards you at top speed? Or stood in your home, secretly recording your life? In 2017, Lucas Apa and Cesar Cerrudo, security researchers with the consultancy IOActive, showed that the version 2.5.5 of Pepper could be hacked through its software because of vulnerabilities that were discovered when it was connected to a network. They demonstrated that the robot could be controlled remotely, its limbs manipulated and its cameras used to spy on users.