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government & the courts


A Legal Approach to "Affirmative Algorithms"

#artificialintelligence

Solutions to fix algorithmic bias could collide with law. Two scholars propose a solution. Proposed solutions to fix algorithmic bias could conflict with Supreme Court rulings on equal protection, legal scholars note. As AI and predictive algorithms permeate ever more areas of decision making, from setting bail to evaluating job applications to making home loans, what happens when an algorithm arbitrarily discriminates against women, African-Americans, or other groups? It happens all the time.


The Supreme Court's Conservatives Sure Are Pushing Some Crazy Legal Theories Lately

Slate

In an ideal world, the Supreme Court would provide stability in the run-up to a presidential election, imposing uniform rules based on long-accepted principles of election law. We do not live in that world. One week out from the 2020 election, four Supreme Court justices have launched a scorched-earth mission against voting rights. They teed up a Bush v. Gore reprise that could hand Donald Trump an unearned victory. These justices are in open revolt against voting rights, abandoning the pretense of "voter fraud" and embracing state legislatures' right to disenfranchise their constituents.


The DOJ Is Fighting Google on a Shifting Battlefield

WIRED

This is normally the time when we start buying candy corn for trick or treaters. But this year is horrifying no matter who comes to the door. After years of investigations, hearings, and the rattling of legal sabers, we finally have a Techlash case: United States of America, et al. v. Google LLC. As I wrote earlier in the week, the government made a direct comparison to the Microsoft case two decades earlier, where it also invoked the trust-busting Sherman Act. In that litigation, the key issue was whether or not Microsoft leveraged its market power to jam its browser down the throats of users.


Legal Judgment Prediction (LJP) Amid the Advent of Autonomous AI Legal Reasoning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Legal Judgment Prediction (LJP) is a longstanding and open topic in the theory and practice-of-law. Predicting the nature and outcomes of judicial matters is abundantly warranted, keenly sought, and vigorously pursued by those within the legal industry and also by society as a whole. The tenuous act of generating judicially laden predictions has been limited in utility and exactitude, requiring further advancement. Various methods and techniques to predict legal cases and judicial actions have emerged over time, especially arising via the advent of computer-based modeling. There has been a wide range of approaches attempted, including simple calculative methods to highly sophisticated and complex statistical models. Artificial Intelligence (AI) based approaches have also been increasingly utilized. In this paper, a review of the literature encompassing Legal Judgment Prediction is undertaken, along with innovatively proposing that the advent of AI Legal Reasoning (AILR) will have a pronounced impact on how LJP is performed and its predictive accuracy. Legal Judgment Prediction is particularly examined using the Levels of Autonomy (LoA) of AI Legal Reasoning, plus, other considerations are explored including LJP probabilistic tendencies, biases handling, actor predictors, transparency, judicial reliance, legal case outcomes, and other crucial elements entailing the overarching legal judicial milieu.


How AI & Data Analytics Is Impacting Indian Legal System

#artificialintelligence

In a survey conducted by Gurugram-based BML Munjal University (School of Law) in July 2020, it was found that about 42% of lawyers believed that in the next 3 to 5 years as much as 20% of regular, day-to-day legal works could be performed with technologies such as artificial intelligence. The survey also found that about 94% of law practitioners favoured research and analytics as to the most desirable skills in young lawyers. Earlier this year, Chief Justice of India SA Bobde, in no uncertain terms, underlined that the Indian judiciary must equip itself with incorporating artificial intelligence in its system, especially in dealing with document management and cases of repetitive nature. With more industries and professional sectors embracing AI and data analytics, the legal industry, albeit in a limited way, is no exception. According to the 2020 report of the National Judicial Data Grid, over the last decade, 3.7 million cases were pending across various courts in India, including high courts, district and taluka courts.


Microsoft nabs exclusive license to AI program that generates human sounding text

#artificialintelligence

President Trump repeatedly refused to say on Wednesday whether he would commit to a peaceful transition of power if he loses the election to Joe Biden, saying at a press briefing: "We're going to have to see what happens." The big picture: Trump has baselessly claimed on a number of occasions that the only way he will lose the election is if it's "rigged," claiming -- without evidence -- that mail-in ballots will result in widespread fraud. Earlier on Wednesday, the president said he wants to quickly confirm a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg because he believes the Supreme Court may have to decide the result of the election.


SoFi is looking for a great Machine Learning Manager.

#artificialintelligence

SoFi provides equal employment opportunities (EEO) to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, genetics, or any other basis prohibited by applicable law. In addition to federal law requirements, SoFi complies with applicable state and local laws governing nondiscrimination in employment in every location in which the company has facilities. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment, including recruiting, hiring, placement, promotion, termination, layoff, recall, transfer, leaves of absence, compensation and training. Additionally, SoFi participates in the E-Verify program in certain locations, as required by law. Pursuant to the San Francisco Fair Chance Ordinance, we will consider for employment qualified applicants with arrest and conviction records.


An Ontological AI-and-Law Framework for the Autonomous Levels of AI Legal Reasoning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

A framework is proposed that seeks to identify and establish a set of robust autonomous levels articulating the realm of Artificial Intelligence and Legal Reasoning (AILR). Doing so provides a sound and parsimonious basis for being able to assess progress in the application of AI to the law, and can be utilized by scholars in academic pursuits of AI legal reasoning, along with being used by law practitioners and legal professionals in gauging how advances in AI are aiding the practice of law and the realization of aspirational versus achieved results. A set of seven levels of autonomy for AI and Legal Reasoning are meticulously proffered and mindfully discussed.


What No One Will Tell You About Robots

#artificialintelligence

Human fascination with robots has long been fused with fear. The first widespread use of the term came a century ago in a Czech play about robots manufactured to serve and work for people. The bots turn on their masters. That plot has played out in fiction countless times since. Meanwhile, the real world has created ever more advanced versions of mechanical servants.


What No One Will Tell You About Robots

#artificialintelligence

Human fascination with robots has long been fused with fear. The first widespread use of the term came a century ago in a Czech play about robots manufactured to serve and work for people. The bots turn on their masters. That plot has played out in fiction countless times since. Meanwhile, the real world has created ever more advanced versions of mechanical servants.