executive order


Slate's Mistakes for the Week of March 18

Slate

In a March 21 Slatest, Mark Joseph Stern misstated that the April 2019 Wisconsin Supreme Court election could give Democratic justices a majority. That opportunity will not arise until the 2020 election. Due to an editing error, a March 20 Future Tense Newsletter incorrectly stated that the National Institute of Standards and Technology has been using nonconsensually obtained images to train its Facial Recognition Verification Testing program. The NIST does not develop or train facial recognition systems. It provides independent government evaluations of prototype face recognition technologies.


Federal IT Policy, Agency Clamor Pushing Wind Into AI's Sails – MeriTalk

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI), following on the heels of its older sibling RPA (robotic process automation), is no longer waiting to be born, but remains more of a toddler on the Federal IT scene–still learning to walk before trying to run, but bulking up from an appetite for serious Federal government tech interest and investment. Factors that stand in the way of rapid growth in use of the technology may be fairly said to include inertia, budget, lack of understanding, scarcity of obvious projects, insufficient compute power (legacy data centers), and a dearth of large data sets necessary to leverage the technology. But a host of Federal IT policy aims and nascent efforts at agencies are providing plenty of push for the AI Age to kick into higher gear, and point to what may become before too long the largest factor in shying away from AI: a lack of imagination. From the military, to the intelligence community, to civilian agencies, the growth in stated demand for AI projects is impossible to ignore. Intelligence agency officials ticked off a partial list of AI projects and priorities they'd like to pursue, and identified important long-term benefits from getting into the game including drastically reducing the amount of time analysts spend on lower-level monitoring work, and creating a workforce culture that is more comfortable with taking chances on new technology.


DoD outlines a long term plan for AI implementation

#artificialintelligence

Ever since the US fell behind China in the AI arms race the country has been criticized for not being innovative enough and not focusing on the things that matter. As we outline in this previous post, there are a multitude of reasons why China pulled ahead of the rest of the world. Despite the fact that this is clearly a multi faceted issue the US has neglected to focus on the development of new technologies which includes AI. The DoD has seemingly decided to try and address this. Other than the president's recent executive order which lacked any kind of concrete plan or details describing an AI development strategy the US has not released anything that touches this topic.


Trump's National AI Strategy for the United States Analytics Insight

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) specialists across the industry, the academic world and government have since quite a while ago approached the Trump organization to make the improvement of artificial intelligence a noteworthy priority. President Trump signed an executive order recently intended to encourage the improvement and management of artificial intelligence, an innovation that numerous specialists believe will characterize the fate of everything from consumer products to healthcare to military operation. China discharged a plan for AI two years back and it was accounted for that several billions of dollars have been diverted into the advancement of the technology, while the U.S. has been deficient in the national policy region. The historical backdrop of computing and artificial intelligence has consistently been inherently linked to government spending and technique, individuals regularly refer to state funding that made the Internet, however more consideration ought to be given to the way that the principal computers, most supercomputers, inside parts, for example, RAM, and much more, were all initially based on the government's dime. Along these lines, endless artificial intelligence advancements can be followed back to government support, Apple's Siri, for instance, was an outgrowth from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's CALO venture.


Trump revokes Obama-era order to report civilian drone deaths

Al Jazeera

President Donald Trump has signed an executive order that revoked an Obama-era policy requiring United States intelligence officials to report civilian deaths in drone attacks outside active war zones. Former President Barack Obama, put the policy in place in 2016 as part of an effort to be more transparent about drone attacks after he had dramatically increased their use against armed groups in mostly Muslim countries. Trump's rescinding of the policy was done with little fanfare on Wednesday. The White House released the text of his executive order. "This action eliminates superfluous reporting requirements, requirements that do not improve government transparency, but rather distract our intelligence professionals from their primary mission," an administration official said.


The U.S. must lead in artificial intelligence -- FCW

#artificialintelligence

The United States must get serious about a comprehensive strategy on artificial intelligence or risk losing leadership in a technology that is different from any other that's been developed so far. Nations that lead in AI stand to gain tremendous advantages across industry, government and society at large. More than 20 countries and governing bodies have already released strategies to promote the development of AI in an effort to reap its benefits and, in some cases, take the lead in AI. But despite a promising recent executive order, the U.S., notably, has not created such a strategy. A transformative technology, AI's potential benefits include improving healthcare, streamlining national security and cyber defense, enabling more precise data analytics, and making agriculture more sustainable.


China is overtaking the U.S. as the leader in artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Researchers, companies and countries around the world are racing to explore -- and exploit -- the possibilities of artificial intelligence technology. China is working on an extremely aggressive multi-billion-dollar plan for government investment into AI research and applications. The U.S. government has been slower to act. The Obama administration issued a report on AI near the end of its term. Since then, little has happened -- until a Feb. 11 executive order from President Donald Trump encouraging the country to do more with AI.


China is catching up to the US on artificial intelligence research

#artificialintelligence

Researchers, companies and countries around the world are racing to explore – and exploit – the possibilities of artificial intelligence technology. China is working on an extremely aggressive multi-billion-dollar plan for government investment into AI research and applications. The U.S. government has been slower to act. The Obama administration issued a report on AI near the end of its term. Since then, little has happened – until a Feb. 11 executive order from President Donald Trump encouraging the country to do more with AI.


China is overtaking the U.S. as the leader in artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Researchers, companies and countries around the world are racing to explore -- and exploit -- the possibilities of artificial intelligence technology. China is working on an extremely aggressive multi-billion-dollar plan for government investment into AI research and applications. The U.S. government has been slower to act. The Obama administration issued a report on AI near the end of its term. Since then, little has happened -- until a Feb. 11 executive order from President Donald Trump encouraging the country to do more with AI.


China Is Catching Up to the U.S. on Artificial Intelligence Research

#artificialintelligence

Researchers, companies and countries around the world are racing to explore – and exploit – the possibilities of artificial intelligence technology. China is working on an extremely aggressive multi-billion-dollar plan for government investment into AI research and applications. The U.S. government has been slower to act. The Obama administration issued a report on AI near the end of its term. Since then, little has happened – until a Feb. 11 executive order from President Donald Trump encouraging the country to do more with AI.