cold case


Summer travel diary: Reopening cold cases with robotic data discoveries

Robohub

As a child of refugees, my parents' narrative is missing huge gaps of information. In our data rich world, archivists are finally piecing together new clues of history using unmanned systems to reopen cold cases. The Nazis were masters in using technology to mechanize killing and erasing all evidence of their crime. Nowhere is this more apparent than in Treblinka, Poland. The death camp exterminated close to 900,000 Jews over a 15-month period before a revolt led to its dismantlement in 1943.


3 attacks you'd miss without AI

#artificialintelligence

There has been a lot of hype around AI to the point where some people are simply tuning it out. I think this is a mistake. While there are limits to what AI can do, there also are sophisticated attacks that we'd miss without it. The need for AI is driven by three fundamental yet significant changes in the enterprise computing environment. Taking all of these factors together leads me to believe that AI is not only a viable solution, but it may be the only solution.


Dutch police are using AI to pick out the most solvable cold cases

#artificialintelligence

Dutch Police are using artificial intelligence to crack unsolved cases, according to The Next Web. The national police force is working to digitize the more than 1,500 reports and 30 million pages of material in its cold case archive, only 15 percent of which is currently stored electronically. Once the transfer is complete, a machine learning algorithm will begin combing through the records and deciding which cases have the most promising evidence, reducing case processing time from weeks to a single day. "We're teaching the machine to do forensic screening," Jeroen Hammer, one of the architects of the system, told The Next Web. "The goal is that the AI can read cold cases we're currently digitizing, and decide which ones contain promising evidence that could lead to solving the case."


Investigators are using AI to find who betrayed Anne Frank

#artificialintelligence

In August of 1944, Anne Frank and her family were captured by the Gestapo after spending a gruelling two years hidden in a secret annex within their apartment. The prolific diarist's work would posthumously bring her fame and recognition the world over. But, to this day, no one has been able to identify who was behind the betrayal that led to her death in a concentration camp. Retired sleuth Vincent Pankoke, and his team of investigators (comprised of forensic scientists and members of the Dutch police force), are partnering with Amsterdam-based data company Xomnia on the ultimate cold case. As part of the newly-opened enquiry, a specially developed algorithm will scour reams of documents from the period.


Investigators are using AI to find who betrayed Anne Frank

Engadget

In August of 1944, Anne Frank and her family were captured by the Gestapo after spending a gruelling two years hidden in a secret annex within their apartment. The prolific diarist's work would posthumously bring her fame and recognition the world over. But, to this day, no one has been able to identify who was behind the betrayal that led to her death in a concentration camp. Fast forward 73 years, and a former FBI agent is betting artificial intelligence can help crack the mystery. Retired sleuth Vincent Pankoke, and his team of investigators (comprised of forensic scientists and members of the Dutch police force), are partnering with Amsterdam-based data company Xomnia on the ultimate cold case.