Goto

Collaborating Authors

cochlear implant


Artificial Vision - On Medicine

#artificialintelligence

For nearly 100 years, we have understood the idea that it might be possible to restore sight to those who have become blind through a device that delivers electrical stimulation to the brain [Mirochnik, Pezaris, 2019]. Visual prostheses, as they are called, form part of a constellation of approaches that seek to deliver input to the brain to replace a lost or missing sense, including cochlear implants for the deaf, and cortical implants for the insensate, such as amputees with robotic arms. The challenges faced by each approach are similar: biological compatibility, long-term functional stability, and interpretability of the evoked sensations. Biological compatibility has thus far been addressed by careful selection of materials and implant techniques, but much remains to be done to create devices that the body will tolerate for decades with a low risk of infection or rejection. The first major challenge is long-term functional stability; ensuring that the effectiveness of the devices do not degrade over time.


Machine learning algorithm uses brain scans to predict language ability in deaf children

#artificialintelligence

In a new international collaborative study between The Chinese University of Hong Kong and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, researchers created a machine learning algorithm that uses brain scans to predict language ability in deaf children after they receive a cochlear implant. This study's novel use of artificial intelligence to understand brain structure underlying language development has broad reaching implications for children with developmental challenges. It was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.


Phone calls can be beamed right into your central nervous system

New Scientist

Just what you need in the age of ubiquitous surveillance: the latest cochlear implants will allow users stream audio directly from their iPhone into their cochlear nerve. Apple and implant manufacturer Cochlear have made "Made for iPhone" connectivity available for any hearing implants that use the next-generation Nucleus 7 sound processor. The advance means that these implants can also stream music and Netflix shows. The technology was first unveiled in 2014 when it was added to hearing aids such as the Starkey Halo and ReSound LiNX. But this is the first time it's been linked into the central nervous system.


Cochlear is switching to artificial intelligence for its implants

#artificialintelligence

Business Insider Australia is the Australian edition of the world's fastest-growing business news website, Business Insider. Australia's pioneering bionic ear company, Cochlear, plans to use artificial intelligence to more accurately implant and calibrate its devices. Cochlear today announced an exclusive licensing and development agreement with Otoconsult for its artificial intelligence fitting assistant FOX (Fitting to Outcomes eXpert). The company says the technology is expected to enable a faster and more consistent fitting of cochlear implants. A short time ago, Cochlear shares were trading at $147.09, up 0.2% in a falling market.


Cochlear is switching to artificial intelligence for its implants

#artificialintelligence

Business Insider Australia is the Australian edition of the world's fastest-growing business news website, Business Insider. Australia's pioneering bionic ear company, Cochlear, plans to use artificial intelligence to more accurately implant and calibrate its devices. Cochlear today announced an exclusive licensing and development agreement with Otoconsult for its artificial intelligence fitting assistant FOX (Fitting to Outcomes eXpert). "FOX's artificial intelligence assistant will provide clinicians, no matter where they are in the world, a platform to speed up the cochlear implant fitting process while also helping them achieve the best possible patient outcome," says Cochlear CEO Chris Smith.


Melding mind and machine: How close are we?

#artificialintelligence

Can the mind connect directly with artificial intelligence, robots and other minds through brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies to transcend our human limitations? Over the last 50 years, researchers at university labs and companies around the world have made impressive progress toward achieving such a vision. Recently, successful entrepreneurs such as Elon Musk (Neuralink) and Bryan Johnson (Kernel) have announced new startups that seek to enhance human capabilities through brain-computer interfacing. How close are we really to successfully connecting our brains to our technologies? And what might the implications be when our minds are plugged in?


How Close Are We Really To Connecting Human Minds To Artificial Intelligence? - GE Reports

#artificialintelligence

Can the mind connect directly with artificial intelligence, robots and other minds through brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies to transcend our human limitations? Over the last 50 years, researchers at university labs and companies around the world have made impressive progress toward achieving such a vision. Recently, successful entrepreneurs such as Elon Musk (Neuralink) and Bryan Johnson (Kernel) have announced new startups that seek to enhance human capabilities through brain-computer interfacing. How close are we really to successfully connecting our brains to our technologies? And what might the implications be when our minds are plugged in?


Melding Mind and Machine: How Close Are We?

#artificialintelligence

This article was originally published at The Conversation. The publication contributed the article to Space.com's Can the mind connect directly with artificial intelligence, robots and other minds through brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies to transcend our human limitations? Over the last 50 years, researchers at university labs and companies around the world have made impressive progress toward achieving such a vision. Recently, successful entrepreneurs such as Elon Musk (Neuralink) and Bryan Johnson (Kernel) have announced new startups that seek to enhance human capabilities through brain-computer interfacing.


Melding Mind and Machine: How Close Are We?

#artificialintelligence

The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation, an online publication covering the latest research. Can the mind connect directly with artificial intelligence, robots and other minds through brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies to transcend our human limitations? Over the last 50 years, researchers at university labs and companies around the world have made impressive progress toward achieving such a vision. Recently, successful entrepreneurs such as Elon Musk (Neuralink) and Bryan Johnson (Kernel) have announced new startups that seek to enhance human capabilities through brain-computer interfacing. How close are we really to successfully connecting our brains to our technologies?


This robot is perfectly designed to drill tiny tunnels in your skull

Popular Science

Imagine rolling into an operating room to find that your surgical team included a robot. While full-fledged robotic surgeons aren't quite ready for the spotlight, automatons have already found a foothold in the surgical theater. Some systems allow doctors to control robotic instruments--ones able to slice and dice with inhuman precision--using controls or a computer screen, while other medical robots take a doctor's place entirely to conduct specific segments of a larger surgery. Now scientists have taken a big step forward with the latter type of bot: in a study published Wednesday in Science Robotics, a team reports the first ever robot-assisted cochlear implantation surgery. "We were on this project for more than eight years," says lead study author Stefan Weber, a professor at the University of Bern, Switzerland's ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research.