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How to Fit Artificial Intelligence into Manufacturing

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been tainted with a lot of negative press since its conception. Many people in the workforce have started to question the motives for implementing AI in factories and other workplaces. However, there are responsible AI practices aimed at making the workplace a better place for employees. A prime example of this includes the applications of AI in manufacturing. Its implementation in this industry proves that the tech is only good as its user.


AI's carbon footprint problem

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For all the advances enabled by artificial intelligence, from speech recognition to self-driving cars, AI systems consume a lot of power and can generate high volumes of climate-changing carbon emissions. A study last year found that training an off-the-shelf AI language-processing system produced 1,400 pounds of emissions -- about the amount produced by flying one person roundtrip between New York and San Francisco. The full suite of experiments needed to build and train that AI language system from scratch can generate even more: up to 78,000 pounds, depending on the source of power. But there are ways to make machine learning cleaner and greener, a movement that has been called "Green AI." Some algorithms are less power-hungry than others, for example, and many training sessions can be moved to remote locations that get most of their power from renewable sources.


Artificial Intelligence For Decarbonization - GoingGreen

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Going Green sits down with Dr. Austin Sendek, Founder & CEO of Aionics, Inc. to discuss his path to building an artificial intelligence platform to help with R&D in decarbonizing materials. I am the CEO and Founder at Aionics, Inc. I am the CEO/Founder at Aionics, a company commercializing A.I. software for accelerating the pace of R&D in decarbonization materials. I founded Aionics after graduating with my Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Stanford in 2018. At the time, I had offers to join several materials companies at the executive or VP-level, but ultimately decided I could have a broader impact on global carbon emissions if I built an R&D platform that could be licensed across multiple companies in multiple industries.


Hitting the Books: How autonomous EVs could help solve climate change

Engadget

Climate change is far and away the greatest threat of the modern human era -- a crisis that will only get worse the longer we dither -- with American car culture as a major contributor to the nation's greenhouse emissions. But carbon-neutralizing energy and solutions are already on the horizon and, in some more developed countries like Sweden, are already being deployed. In his latest book, Our Livable World, science and technology analyst Marc Shaus, takes readers on a fascinating tour of the emerging tools -- from "smart highways" to jet fuel made from trash -- that will not only help curb climate change but perhaps even usher in a new, more sustainable, livable world. The following excerpt is reprinted from Our Livable World: How Scientists Today Are Creating the Clean Earth of Tomorrow by Marc Shaus. Reprinted with permission of Diversion Books.


AI is all good for Environmental Sustainability? Think again.

#artificialintelligence

Though there are plenty of opportunities and evidences that AI adoption facilitate companies to improve its environmental sustainability, it is important for companies to be aware that AI has also the potential to produce significant carbon emissions, and also has the potential to offset or reduce those carbon emissions. Companies need to understand how this can affect the operations and financial performance. As companies are pressed to be more transparent in managing its sustainability issues, companies would also need to monitor and disclose on its strategy and performance related to AI and its impacts, thus questions on its effectiveness to mitigate carbon emissions as well as threats imposed on the environment, would also likely to be asked by the stakeholders.


It's time to talk about the carbon footprint of artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is an increasingly important element of science, medicine, and even the minutiae of our daily lives. Chatbots, digital assistants, and movie and music recommendations from streaming services all depend on "deep learning"--a process by which computer models are trained to recognize patterns in data. That training requires powerful computers and lots and lots of energy--and associated carbon emissions. One of the most elaborate deep learning models, designed to produce human-like language and known as GPT-3, requires an amount of energy equivalent to the yearly consumption of 126 Danish homes and creates a carbon footprint equivalent to traveling 700,000 kilometers by car for a single training session. Still, the computing power used in deep learning grew 300,000-fold between 2012 and 2018, and if that pace of growth continues it's not hard to see how artificial intelligence could have a major climate impact.


'Video game planes emit real carbon': why gaming is not merely guilt-free escapism

The Guardian

There's a woman in my social media feed who has spent the past week flying around the world in an Airbus A320. The degree of enviousness with which I look at her photos of skylines and mountains is well past being impolite. She's playing Microsoft Flight Simulator, the latest video game to capture the public's imagination as a kind of Covid-19 era balm. This is a game that uses Bing maps satellite data to create a one-to-one scale replica of the entire planet, ready for players to explore now that the pleasures of physical travel have been temporarily relinquished by most of us. Like Animal Crossing before it, which allowed a newly locked-down world to escape to an idyllic, pleasantly sociable tropical island, Flight Simulator is the perfect game for the moment.


Power Plant 4.0: Embracing next-generation technologies for power plant digitization

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Even before the outbreak of COVID-19, fossil-fuel power plants faced significant disruption from renewable energy sources, low gas prices, and ambitious decarbonization goals, all of which are changing customer preferences. Now, as the power-generation industry shifts to the next normal, adopting the latest digital and advanced-analytics technologies has become critical. Many power companies began their digital transformations with technological solutions such as data models, which help optimize set points, enable better dispatch decisions, and support maintenance strategies and operating-mode selection. Forward-thinking companies, however, have recently started using visualization tools to manage real-time generation performance and digital control software to relay predictive data to control rooms. Yet these innovations are grounded in tangibly improving outcomes for plant operations and are therefore only part of a digitally enabled, next-generation power plant (Exhibit 1).


Microsoft And Shell Announce New Partnership To Use Artificial Intelligence And Tech To Reduce Carbon Emissions

#artificialintelligence

Tackling carbon emissions is one of the biggest challenges faced by the world today. For big business, this means making a strategic and managed move towards increasing the use of renewable energy sources, as well as creating efficiencies across all aspects of their operations. It's a difficult task to manage alone, even for an enterprise on the scale of tech giant Microsoft or energy titan Shell. But working together creates new possibilities that go further than what it is likely they could accomplish individually. Beyond meeting their own zero-carbon commitments, there's the opportunity to help other companies within their vast ecosystems of customers and suppliers to meet their environmental and safety goals, too.


Microsoft And Shell Announce New Partnership To Use Artificial Intelligence And Tech To Reduce Carbon Emissions

#artificialintelligence

Tackling carbon emissions is one of the biggest challenges faced by the world today. For big business, this means making a strategic and managed move towards increasing the use of renewable energy sources, as well as creating efficiencies across all aspects of their operations. It's a difficult task to manage alone, even for an enterprise on the scale of tech giant Microsoft or energy titan Shell. But working together creates new possibilities that go further than what it is likely they could accomplish individually. Beyond meeting their own zero-carbon commitments, there's the opportunity to help other companies within their vast ecosystems of customers and suppliers to meet their environmental and safety goals, too.