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Boston Dynamics' latest robot doesn't do backflips -- and that's a smart move

#artificialintelligence

Boston Dynamics has made a name for itself through fascinating videos of biped and quadruped robots doing backflips, opening doors, and dancing to Uptown Funk. Now, it has revealed its latest gadget: A robot that looks like a huge overhead projector on wheels. It's called Stretch, it doesn't do backflips, it doesn't dance, and it's made to do one task: moving boxes. But this could, in fact, become the most successful commercial product of Boston Dynamics and turn it into a profitable company. Stretch has a box-like base with a set of wheels that can move in all directions.


How to shut down Spot the robot 'dog,' should you ever need to

Mashable

Let's say, just hypothetically, that a surveillance robot styled after a dog was giving you a hard time. In this situation, you'd want to shut the thing down, and quickly. Thankfully, when it comes to Boston Dynamic's Spot robot, there are several ways to do just that. The robots, marketed for industrial use and used for viral hijinks, evoke a robot dystopia in the public imagination -- a fact compounded by an April viral video of the NYPD trotting out its very own customized Spot. The first reported instance of police using Spot was in November of 2019, when the Massachusetts State Police leased at least one of the robots for a three-month trial period.


Boston Dynamics' Spot robot tested in combat training with the French army

Engadget

Boston Dynamics robotic dog Spot was one of several robots tested by the French army during training sessions at a military school in the northwest of France, The Verge and France Ouest have reported. It was used during a two-day training session with the aim of "measuring the added value of robots in combat action," said school commandant Jean-Baptiste Cavalier. The exercises aimed to get students thinking about how robots might be deployed in future combat situations. The students designed three offensive and defensive missions, with Spot used primarily for reconnaissance. The scenarios were performed by students first without and then with the aid of the robots. Other bots deployed were a remote-controlled tank-like vehicle called OPTIO-X20 armed with a cannon and Barakuda, an armor-plated wheeled drone designed to provide cover to advancing soldiers.


Is Boston Dynamics becoming a boring robotics company?

#artificialintelligence

Boston Dynamics has made a name for itself through fascinating videos of biped and quadruped robots doing backflips, opening doors, and dancing to Uptown Funk. Now, it has revealed its latest gadget: A robot that looks like a huge overhead projector on wheels. It's called Stretch, it doesn't do backflips, it doesn't dance, and it's made to do one task: moving boxes. But this could, in fact, become the most successful commercial product of Boston Dynamics and turn it into a profitable company. Stretch has a box-like base with a set of wheels that can move in all directions. On top of the base are a large robotic arm and a perception mast.


Robot dog gets trained to follow the leader

ZDNet

A company spun off from the maker of Vespa scooters wants robots to follow the leader. To that end, it has equipped a famous robot dog, Boston Dynamics' Spot, with proof-of-concept technology to enable it to follow humans around. Piaggio Fast Forward (PFF), which cut its teeth on a robot designed to follow humans and carry 40 pounds of stuff, envisions the technology as a future keystone of collaborative industrial automation. "Most robotics companies look at the world as a world of obstacles," said Greg Lynn, PFF's chief executive officer. "At PFF, we adopted the opposite approach and this philosophy has fueled our research of how humans and robots physically move through space. We design behaviors that understand people and help automate tasks so you don't have to build complicated hardware. Working with Trimble to boost the process of replacing remote-controlled robots traveling on predetermined paths in mapped environments enable yet another step in the ultimate goal of providing safe and intuitive operations of machines in industrial environments. Dynamic following technology is one step closer to kicking the doors open to further implementation--from power tools to farming equipment to even automated vehicles."


Meet Boston Dynamics' new robot, called Stretch

#artificialintelligence

The new robot comes in the form of a mobile base equipped with a robotic arm and gripper. After having deployed the flagship robot dog Spot for a range of different applications, from factory floors to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, robotics company Boston Dynamics has added a brand-new specimen to its line of automatons, this time designed to move boxes around warehouses. Called Stretch, the new robot comes in the form of a mobile base equipped with a robotic arm and gripper, packed with smart sensors and controls that can identify and handle different boxes and shrink-wrapped cases. For now, Stretch's main ability consists of identifying, gripping, and unloading boxes off trucks, but according to Boston Dynamics, the robot will later expand into order building. The company is, therefore, making a debut in warehouse automation – understandably so, given the pace at which the field has accelerated over the course of the past year.


Autonomous systems and the 2nd industrial revolution.

#artificialintelligence

We've all seen the super cool demonstrations of Boston Dynamics' two-legged Atlas robot doing backflips, and been properly amazed! Today, an article about a new robot from Boston Dynamics caught my eye. Stretch is designed for logistics applications. It lifts and moves boxes in warehouses. Unlike traditional industrial robots, it isn't fixed in place, but is mobile instead.


Meet Boston Dynamics' new robot, called Stretch

ZDNet

The new robot comes in the form of a mobile base equipped with a robotic arm and gripper. After having deployed the flagship robot dog Spot for a range of different applications, from factory floors to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, robotics company Boston Dynamics has added a brand-new specimen to its line of automatons, this time designed to move boxes around warehouses. Called Stretch, the new robot comes in the form of a mobile base equipped with a robotic arm and gripper, packed with smart sensors and controls that can identify and handle different boxes and shrink-wrapped cases. For now, Stretch's main ability consists of identifying, gripping, and unloading boxes off trucks, but according to Boston Dynamics, the robot will later expand into order building. The company is therefore making a debut in warehouse automation – understandably so, given the pace at which the field has accelerated over the course of the past year.


The next generation of robots

#artificialintelligence

How did Michael Crichton, Sean Connery, and Wesley Snipes factor into the creation of a preeminent robotics firm? The story begins on the movie set of the 1993 action thriller "Rising Sun," starring Connery and Snipes and based off the Crichton novel of the same name. It was during a week of filming under the hot California sun that Raibert, then a professor at MIT, realized there was more work to do. "We were providing robots for the background of a scene in the movie," said Raibert. "And we were there for a week. And it was a week of hell."


Boston Dynamics' new robot Stretch can help move boxes in warehouses

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Boston Dynamics, the company many people know for its dog robot Spot, has unveiled a new bot targeting warehouses. The company's new robot called Stretch was designed for moving boxes at warehouses and distribution centers. Stretch features a small, omni-directional mobile base, a custom-designed lightweight arm and a smart-gripper with advanced sensing and controls to handle a variety of packages. "Warehouses are struggling to meet rapidly increasing demand as the world relies more on just-in-time delivery of goods," said Robert Playter, CEO of Boston Dynamics, in a statement Monday. "Mobile robots enable the flexible movement of materials and improve working conditions for employees."