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Forehead scanners result in a large number of false, study warns

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Thermal screening to spot people infected with coronavirus is more reliable when scanning the eyeball and fingertip than taking body or forehead measurements. Experts in human physiology published a scientific article on the usefulness of thermometers which scan a person's skin to detect a fever. They say the current process is fundamentally flawed and produces a large number of false negatives, as well as some false positives, and also because not all people infected with the coronavirus develop a fever. A fever is defined as a temperature of greater than or equal to 100.4F (38 C) if spotted outside of a healthcare environment. In healthcare settings, such as a hospital, a fever is technically defined as anything greater than or equal to 100.0F (37.8 C).


Using artificial intelligence to help drones find people lost in the woods

#artificialintelligence

A trio of researchers at Johannes Kepler University has used artificial intelligence to improve thermal imaging camera searches of people lost in the woods. In their paper published in the journal Nature Machine Intelligence, David Schedl, Indrajit Kurmi and Oliver Bimber, describe how they applied a deep learning network to the problem of people lost in the woods and how well it worked. When people become lost in forests, search and rescue experts use helicopters to fly over the area where they are most likely to be found. In addition to simply scanning the ground below, the researchers use binoculars and thermal imaging cameras. It is hoped that such cameras will highlight differences in body temperature of people on the ground versus their surroundings making them easier to spot.


Using artificial intelligence to help drones find people lost in the woods

#artificialintelligence

A trio of researchers at Johannes Kepler University has used artificial intelligence to improve thermal imaging camera searches of people lost in the woods. In their paper published in the journal Nature Machine Intelligence, David Schedl, Indrajit Kurmi and Oliver Bimber, describe how they applied a deep learning network to the problem of people lost in the woods and how well it worked. When people become lost in forests, search and rescue experts use helicopters to fly over the area where they are most likely to be found. In addition to simply scanning the ground below, the researchers use binoculars and thermal imaging cameras. It is hoped that such cameras will highlight differences in body temperature of people on the ground versus their surroundings making them easier to spot.


How artificial intelligence can transform airports for better public health

#artificialintelligence

Technology is a double-edged sword. The same transportation technologies that improved travel efficiency and brought the world closer, have ironically facilitated the record-breaking spread of Covid-19 and in a way, driven people apart. In this modern day, it is easy for a person to traverse multiple continents within 24 hours, mixing with many people along the way during journeys. In hindsight, it is evident that disease prevention and pandemic management technologies were not developed with a consideration of the potential impacts that enclosed, heavily populated and constrained transportation vehicles might facilitate the communication of disease. We are in fact, still figuring this out.


AI-Based Fever Detection Camera Market Size, Share

#artificialintelligence

The global AI-based fever detection camera market size is USD1.28 billion by 2020 and is projected to reach USD 2.19 billion by 2027, exhibiting a CAGR of 8.0% during the forecast period. The worldwide surge in the growth of corona infected people has led to the emergence of advanced artificial intelligence-based fever detection cameras to monitor and detect human body temperature. Vaccine for coronavirus is still in its development stage and hence, the only way to reduce the spread of this pandemic is to isolate the infected person from the crowd. This type of camera is being considered as an efficient and effective device to identify a person with high temperature as fever is one of the symptoms of coronavirus. An individual with high temperature is further screened with virus-specific tests.


Neural Networks Fail to Learn Periodic Functions and How to Fix It

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Previous literature offers limited clues on how to learn a periodic function using modern neural networks. We start with a study of the extrapolation properties of neural networks; we prove and demonstrate experimentally that the standard activations functions, such as ReLU, tanh, sigmoid, along with their variants, all fail to learn to extrapolate simple periodic functions. We hypothesize that this is due to their lack of a "periodic" inductive bias. As a fix of this problem, we propose a new activation, namely, $x + \sin^2(x)$, which achieves the desired periodic inductive bias to learn a periodic function while maintaining a favorable optimization property of the ReLU-based activations. Experimentally, we apply the proposed method to temperature and financial data prediction.


How AI and IoT can Reshape Transportation Systems for Better Public Health

#artificialintelligence

Covid-19 has indelibly transformed the way society thinks and interacts. Extended lockdowns around the world have compelled most people to work from home. And while some may perceive this as temporary, the emerging sensibility is that social distancing and even semi-lockdowns will continue over the foreseeable future to safeguard public health. Transportation Agencies will have to adopt smarter strategies to support public health policies which will be needed worldwide for the next two to three years, and may become the new norm. Moving forward, it is necessary to take a holistic view of transportation systems, and better account for public health.


Robot takes contact-free measurements of patients' vital signs

Robohub

During the current coronavirus pandemic, one of the riskiest parts of a health care worker's job is assessing people who have symptoms of Covid-19. Researchers from MIT, Boston Dynamics, and Brigham and Women's Hospital hope to reduce that risk by using robots to remotely measure patients' vital signs. The robots, which are controlled by a handheld device, can also carry a tablet that allows doctors to ask patients about their symptoms without being in the same room. "In robotics, one of our goals is to use automation and robotic technology to remove people from dangerous jobs," says Henwei Huang, an MIT postdoc. "We thought it should be possible for us to use a robot to remove the health care worker from the risk of directly exposing themselves to the patient."


How automation technology can help in COVID-19 management

#artificialintelligence

COVID-19, that has taken the world by a storm, has posed a great challenge to the country as well as business leaders. With the pandemic still looming large, businesses and establishments have undergone many changes, business meetings have gone virtual, education has now turned to online learning and work-from-home has become a new normal for the corporates. In more ways than one, the pandemic has affected businesses around the world drastically with massive changes in place. However, no matter how grave the situation is, we need to make ourselves agile and adaptable to the changes and bring the best out of what we have right now. Just as business operations and education have adapted to the new normal by resorting to video conferencing and online learning, many other establishments including, both government and private, are pondering over ways to boost the economy while tackling the social as well as health impact of COVID-19.


From UV light sanitizing to AI fever tracking, these are the emerging technologies retailers are using to prevent the spread of the coronavirus in stores

#artificialintelligence

When Saks Fifth Avenue reopened in New York City last month, it featured several new safety and sanitary features, with one particularly notable addition -- ultraviolet light handrail sanitizing. The ultraviolet light emanating from the escalators of the sprawling department store is just one of a smattering of emerging technologies popping up in brick-and-mortar stores to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. These virus prevention systems -- ranging from room density monitors to non-invasive body temperature scanning -- are evolving into a booming industry of their own. Here's what you can expect to see -- or rather, not see -- on upcoming shopping trips. One such unobtrusive technology is Density, which monitors room occupancy with the help of sensors that measure the depth and body patterns of visitors walking through doors leading into a public space.