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Australian Researchers Have Just Released The World's First AI-Developed Vaccine

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A team at Flinders University in South Australia has developed a new vaccine believed to be the first human drug in the world to be completely designed by artificial intelligence (AI). While drugs have been designed using computers before, this vaccine went one step further being independently created by an AI program called SAM (Search Algorithm for Ligands). Flinders University Professor Nikolai Petrovsky who led the development told Business Insider Australia its name is derived from what it was tasked to do: search the universe for all conceivable compounds to find a good human drug (also called a ligand). "We had to teach the AI program on a set of compounds that are known to activate the human immune system, and a set of compounds that don't work. The job of the AI was then to work out for itself what distinguished a drug that worked from one that doesn't," Petrovsky said, who is also the Research Director of Australian biotechnology company Vaxine.


New electronic test is ten per cent more accurate than dermatologists at detecting skin cancer

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Australian researchers have praised a computer that has been hailed for being better than an international team of specialists at detecting skin cancer. Scientists from Germany, the United States and France developed an artificial intelligence system to distinguish dangerous skin lesions from benign ones, showing it more than 100,000 images. The computer was found to offer more accuracy and fast diagnostics than 58 dermatologists from 17 countries, when shown photos of malignant melanomas and benign moles. Scientists from Germany, the U.S. and France developed an artificial intelligence system to distinguish dangerous skin lesions from benign ones, showing it more than 100,000 images On average, flesh and blood dermatologists accurately detected 86.6 percent of skin cancers from the images, compared to 95 percent for the machine, known as a convolutional neural network or CNN. Australian experts Victoria Mar, from Melbourne's Monash University, and Peter Soyer from the University of Queensland said it was a major breakthrough in detecting skin cancers.


Death Star superlaser can combine beams

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Australian researchers have revealed a new technique to combine lasers into a single beam using diamonds - similar to the'superlaser' seen on the Death Star in the hit film Star Wars. The researchers say their breakthrough could be used for everything from shooting down drones on Earth to blasting space junk in orbit. Australian researchers have revealed a new technique to combine lasers into a single beam using diamonds - similar to the'superlaser' seen on the Death Star in the hit film Star Wars. Researchers at Macquarie University say their research, published in Laser and Photonics Reviews, demonstrates a concept where the power of multiple laser beams is transferred into a single intense output beam that can be directed to the intended target. 'Researchers are developing high power lasers to combat threats to security from the increased proliferation of low-cost drones and missile technology,' said said co-author Associate Professor Rich Mildren.


Researchers find female fish developed bigger brains after rape attempts

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Despite what you might think, evolution rarely happens because something is good for a species. Instead, natural selection favours genetic variants that are good for the individuals that possess them. This leads to a much more complicated and messy world, with different selective forces pushing in many directions, even within a single species. A team of Swedish and Australian researchers led by Séverine Buechel from Stockholm Universitywondered if, like predator-prey conflict, sexual conflict might also affect the evolution of brain size. The team bred mosquitofish in a lab - both male and female.


Terminator-style robots could be step closer thanks to Australian researchers

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The self-assembling shape shifting killer robots from the Terminator films could be a step closer, thanks to the development of self-propelling liquid metals. A team of Australian researchers is laying the groundwork for T-1000s by creating the basis of soft electric circuits. Unlike modern circuitry found in electronic devices, which remain based on circuits with solid state components, future connections could be much more flexible and able to move and reconfigure as necessary. A team at RMIT University in Melbourne used non-toxic alloys of the metal gallium, which is liquid at close to room temperature. By adding droplets of the alloy galinstan to water and changing the pH, they were able to make the drops move about freely.