attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder


Investing in AI Mental Health Startups – An Overview Emerj

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Radhika previously worked in content marketing at three technology firms, and graduated from Sri Krishna College Of Engineering And Technology with a degree in Information Technology. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, the United States is currently battling a mental health epidemic. One in every five Americans struggles with mental illness in one form or another. According to the Center for Workplace Mental Health founded by the American Psychiatric Association, up to 7% of full-time workers in the U.S. suffer from major depressive disorder, the economic cost of which is estimated to be $210.5 billion per year. When compared to other developed nations, traditional healthcare in the U.S. is notoriously costly; mental healthcare, even more so.


Hallucinogen Therapy Is Coming - Issue 70: Variables

Nautilus

Three years later Daniel Kreitman still chokes up when he talks about what he saw, and how it changed him. Kreitman, an upholsterer by trade, had taken psilocybin, a hallucinogen derived from mushrooms, in a trial at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine for nicotine addiction. He was 52, and he'd smoked between one and two packs a day for nearly 40 years. After his first psilocybin session, his urge to smoke was gone. During his third and final session, he had the vision that helped him quit for good. He saw lakes, roads, and mountains, and a broad-shouldered man at the helm of a ship, lassoing birds. Was it his dead father? But he remembers giggling and feeling good. Music was playing in his headphones.


Responses to a Critique of Artificial Moral Agents

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The field of machine ethics is concerned with the question of how to embed ethical behaviors, or a means to determine ethical behaviors, into artificial intelligence (AI) systems. The goal is to produce artificial moral agents (AMAs) that are either implicitly ethical (designed to avoid unethical consequences) or explicitly ethical (designed to behave ethically). Van Wynsberghe and Robbins' (2018) paper Critiquing the Reasons for Making Artificial Moral Agents critically addresses the reasons offered by machine ethicists for pursuing AMA research; this paper, co-authored by machine ethicists and commentators, aims to contribute to the machine ethics conversation by responding to that critique. The reasons for developing AMAs discussed in van Wynsberghe and Robbins (2018) are: it is inevitable that they will be developed; the prevention of harm; the necessity for public trust; the prevention of immoral use; such machines are better moral reasoners than humans, and building these machines would lead to a better understanding of human morality. In this paper, each co-author addresses those reasons in turn. In so doing, this paper demonstrates that the reasons critiqued are not shared by all co-authors; each machine ethicist has their own reasons for researching AMAs. But while we express a diverse range of views on each of the six reasons in van Wynsberghe and Robbins' critique, we nevertheless share the opinion that the scientific study of AMAs has considerable value.


Why companies want to mine the secrets in your voice

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Voicesense makes an intriguing promise to its clients: give us someone's voice, and we'll tell you what they will do. The Israeli company uses real-time voice analysis during calls to evaluate whether someone is likely to default on a bank loan, buy a more expensive product, or be the best candidate for a job. It's one of a crop of companies looking for the personal insights contained in our speech. In recent years, researchers and startups have taken note of the rich trove of information that can be mined from voice, especially as the popularity of home assistants like Amazon's Alexa make consumers increasingly comfortable talking to their devices. The voice technology market is growing and is expected to reach $15.5 billion by 2029, according to a report by business analytics firm IdTechEx.


Why companies want to mine the secrets in your voice

#artificialintelligence

Voicesense makes an intriguing promise to its clients: give us someone's voice, and we'll tell you what they will do. The Israeli company uses real-time voice analysis during calls to evaluate whether someone is likely to default on a bank loan, buy a more expensive product, or be the best candidate for a job. It's one of a crop of companies looking for the personal insights contained in our speech. In recent years, researchers and startups have taken note of the rich trove of information that can be mined from voice, especially as the popularity of home assistants like Amazon's Alexa make consumers increasingly comfortable talking to their devices. The voice technology market is growing and is expected to reach $15.5 billion by 2029, according to a report by business analytics firm IdTechEx.


Lyle Brings a Dietitian Powered by AI to Your Phone Just in Time for Your New Year's Weight Loss Resolution

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There are over 13M men in the US who struggle with their weight, and this demographic is currently being underserved by the majority of health and weight loss programs. Lyle is the app that fills this gap through its AI-powered service that helps men reach their health and weight loss goals. Lyle's proprietary technology simulates conversations with a real dietitian to introduce accountability as well as offer personalized meal plans based on the user's goals and health needs. With a few clicks and integrations, the app enables users to conveniently order groceries for the week through third-party vendors like Shipt and Instacart to ensure they are hitting their dietary goals. AlleyWatch sat down with Philip Kasumu about how his personal experience in the fitness and bodybuilding realm inspired him to create an app to promote health and wellness tailored to each man.


Can robots ever have a true sense of self? Scientists are making progress

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Researchers behind a new study, published in Science Robotics, have developed a robotic arm with knowledge of its physical form – a basic sense of self. This is nevertheless an important step. There is no perfect scientific explanation of what exactly constitutes the human sense of self. Emerging studies from neuroscience shows that cortical networks in the motor and parietal areas of the brain are activated in many contexts where we are not physically moving. For example, hearing words such as "pick or kick" activate the motor areas of the brain.


Psychiatrist warns 'gamification' of dating apps is harming our chances of finding love

Daily Mail

The'gamification' of dating apps is damaging singleton's chances of spotting the right match for them, a psychiatrist has warned. Swiping through endless faces on apps like Tinder and Bumble, known as'infinite swipe', The practice has become so addictive that more than one in 10 users swipe for over 14 hours a week, a survey backing up the claims has revealed. Research has found that nearly 30 per cent of dating app users are spending over seven hours per week trying to find a match, and 14 per cent swipe for over 14 hours, encouraged by a phenomena known as'infinite swipe' that sees users swiping through endless faces on the app The rise of dating apps has given rise to a new user phenomenon: the'infinite swipe. Just as other tech platforms such as Facebook and Google have adopted the persuasive design feature of infinite scroll, to engage the user in habit forming experiences, dating apps have leveraged the power of the'infinite swipe'. Users are'nudged" to process the face of a potential match in less than a second, with little or no context on the person's personality.


AI is now being used in cognitive behavioural therapy

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AI can now be used to treat mental health problems. Ieso Digital Health, who specialise in one-to-one clinically led online cognitive behavioural therapy for people dealing with common mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety, have developed a new tool which uses the data from tens-of-thousands of cases of online therapy. The Clinical Decision Support tool provides the online service on behalf of the NHS by using AI to assist therapists, and went live in the UK today. Suggested treatments can be measured, improved and tailored to the person receiving it. It is hoped that the tool will help to drive an increase in patient recovery rates which have remained at around 50 per cent in the UK according to latest figures from NHS England.


How AI may help diagnose mental illnesses

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Artificial intelligence is finding new applications in a range of fields. Now researchers from India and Canada have developed a machine learning-based tool that can diagnose schizophrenia with high accuracy. Although research on major psychiatric illnesses has been going on for decades, there are still no reliable methods to predict and diagnose many ailments. One of reasons is the inherent variability in biological systems. Schizophrenia is a debilitating psychotic illness where diagnosis is often difficult due to its numerous clinical forms and considerable overlap with other psychiatric disorders.