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How Machine Learning Drives the Deceptive World of Deepfakes

#artificialintelligence

Deepfakes are spreading fast, and while some have playful intentions, others can cause serious harm. We stepped inside this deceptive new world to see what experts are doing to catch this altered content. Chances are you've seen a deepfake; Donald Trump, Barack Obama, and Mark Zuckerberg have all been targets of the computer-generated replications. A deepfake is a video or an audio clip where deep learning models create versions of people saying and doing things that have never actually happened. A good deepfake can chip away at our ability to discern fact from fiction, testing whether seeing is really believing.


NASA announces new VIPER Moon rover that will explore the lunar surface

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 25 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com NASA has unveiled its plan to send a new lunar rover, VIPER, to the surface of the Moon. "VIPER is going to rove on the South Pole of the moon and assess where the water ice is," said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine during a wide-ranging speech at the International Astronautical Congress in Washington D.C. on Friday. The government space agency notes that the Moon has vast reservoirs of water ice, an amount that could potentially reach millions of tons.


Ground Control to Major Growth in Hospital Command Centers

#artificialintelligence

Top photos are courtesy of Tampa General Hospital in Tampa, Florida, and feature Andy Day, GE Healthcare's Chief Tile Designer of Clinical Command Centers. Bottom photo is courtesy of Humber River Hospital, Toronto, Canada, a leading partner in command center innovation. When the world rallied around the celebration of the Apollo 11 anniversary this past July, another moonshot was unfolding to somewhat less fanfare not far from where NASA launched Apollo at the Kennedy Space Center – a medical moonshot. Two Florida hospitals, Tampa General Hospital and AdventHealth Orlando, launched mission control-like centers to serve as the nerve-center of their hospitals. Surrounded by big screens, monitors and flashing lights – all meant to help staff across the hospital coordinate care, drive efficiency and improve the way patients move around the hospital – those who were there could be forgiven for thinking they had stepped into a NASA control center.


1969 moon landing was a giant leap for moviemakers, too

The Japan Times

NEW YORK - In 1964, Stanley Kubrick, on the recommendation of the science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke, bought a telescope. "He got this Questar and he attached one of his cameras to it," said Katharina Kubrick, the filmmaker's stepdaughter. "On a night where there was a lunar eclipse, he dragged us all out onto the balcony and we were able to see the moon like a big rubber ball. I don't think I've seen it as clearly since. He looked at it all the time."


Space poll: Americans prefer averting asteroids over Mars missions

Christian Science Monitor | Science

Americans prefer a space program that focuses on potential asteroid impacts, scientific research and using robots to explore the cosmos over sending humans back to the moon or on to Mars, a poll shows. The poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, released Thursday, one month before the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, lists asteroid and comet monitoring as the No. 1 desired objective for the United States space program. About two-thirds of Americans call that very or extremely important, and about a combined 9 in 10 say it's at least moderately important. The poll comes as the White House pushes to get astronauts back on the moon, but only about a quarter of Americans said moon or Mars exploration by astronauts should be among the space program's highest priorities. About another third called each of those moderately important.


Asteroid watch more urgent than Mars trip for Americans: AP-NORC poll

The Japan Times

CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA - Americans prefer a space program that focuses on potential asteroid impacts, scientific research and using robots to explore the cosmos over sending humans back to the moon or on to Mars, a poll shows. The poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, released Thursday, one month before the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, lists asteroid and comet monitoring as the No. 1 desired objective for the U.S. space program. About two-thirds of Americans call that very or extremely important, and about a combined 9 in 10 say it's at least moderately important. The poll comes as the White House pushes to get astronauts back on the moon, but only about a quarter of Americans said moon or Mars exploration by astronauts should be among the space program's highest priorities. About another third called each of those moderately important.


Asteroids, research, robots: Poll shows Americans don't want a space program focused on moon

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Americans prefer a space program that focuses on potential asteroid impacts, scientific research and using robots to explore the cosmos over sending humans back to the moon or on to Mars, a poll shows. The poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, released Thursday, one month before the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, lists asteroid and comet monitoring as the No. 1 desired objective for the U.S. space program. About two-thirds of Americans call that very or extremely important, and about a combined 9 in 10 call it at least moderately important. The poll comes as the White House pushes to get astronauts back on the moon, but only about a quarter of Americans said moon or Mars exploration by astronauts should be among the space program's highest priorities. About another third called each of those moderately important.


Nasa cancels first ever all-female spacewalk because it doesn't have the right spacesuits

The Independent - Tech

Nasa has cancelled the first ever all-female spacewalk, saying it doesn't have enough spacesuits ready in the right size. Two of the astronauts currently on the International Space Station – Christina Koch and Anne McClain – had been set to head out of the floating lab to instal powerful new batteries on the outside to charge up from its solar arrays. But now the space agency says a problem with spacesuits will mean Ms McClain is unable to take part in the spacewalk, and she will be replaced by a man, fellow Nasa astronaut Nick Hague. We'll tell you what's true. You can form your own view.


Fifty Years After Apollo 11, the View of Earth from the Moon

The New Yorker

I saw "Apollo 11" in the Los Angeles suburb of Alhambra, sitting in an IMAX theatre with ten or so other freelancers and retirees who could see a documentary about NASA in the middle of a Thursday. The director and editor, Todd Douglas Miller, tells the story of the moon launch using archival footage, including a trove of 70-mm. The film has no voice-over narration. Instead its story is relayed by the newscasts of Walter Cronkite and the radio transmissions of Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and their interlocutors on Earth. The result is a visual museum about America in July, 1969, in which Aldrin's famous 16-mm.


Remembering Al Reinert and "For All Mankind," the Precursor to "Apollo 11"

The New Yorker

Viewers still coming back down to Earth after watching "Apollo 11," Todd Douglas Miller's new documentary about the spaceflight that first landed men on the moon, might overlook the dedication line in the film's credits: "For Al and Theo." "Theo" refers to Theo Kamecke, the director of the NASA-commissioned documentary "Moonwalk One," from 1972, whose leftover Todd-AO 70-mm. "Al" refers to Al Reinert, the director of "For All Mankind," from 1989, a kaleidoscopic assemblage of Apollo-mission footage narrated by thirteen of the twenty-four astronauts involved. Reinert, who received an Oscar nomination for the film, and another for co-writing Ron Howard's "Apollo 13," died recently, at the age of seventy-one, at home, in Wimberley, Texas. Reinert did not live to see the thirtieth anniversary of his film's release, in January, or the fiftieth anniversary of the moon landing, which will occur in July. But his influence can be seen throughout "Apollo 11," which expands to regular theaters on Friday, following a one-week IMAX run.