air force


5 Ways To Streamline The Supply Chain Using AI

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Industries are investing aggressively in artificial intelligence (AI) projects to drive efficiency for better business performance. International Data Corporation predicts that AI spending will achieve a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 46.2% from 2016 growing to become a $52.2 billion industry by 2021. AI can significantly improve business operations by leveraging the tremendous amount of data generated by sensors monitoring the production and movement of products using IoT. The end result is AIIOT, which is the merging of AI and IoT to manage inventory, logistics, and suppliers with a higher level of awareness and precision. The supply chain is one area that can benefit the most from streamlining since it has a direct influence on profitability and customer satisfaction.


miniature drones

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Shields up! How spaceships can save themselves without science fiction

Mashable

This post is part of Science of Sci-Fi, Mashable's ongoing series dissecting the science (or lack of science) in our favorite sci-fi movies, TV shows, and books. Thanks to fictional depictions, we tend to think of spaceships as well-fortified machines. But in reality, even in the emptiness of outer space, their hulls would be under threat of bombardment from near-invisible enemies. In the Star Wars and Star Trek franchises, ships are usually fitted with deflector shields -- zones of energy that absorbed beams of enemy fire. The USS Enterprise, for example, could repel an enemy's colorful phaser blasts by putting its shields up.


Dancing marshmallow people and enormous rotating globes - Intel's drone shows wow crowds

USATODAY

Intel Corporation flies 2,018 Intel Shooting Star drones over its Folsom, California, facility, in July 2018. The drone light show set a Guinness World Records title for the most unmanned aerial vehicles airborne simultaneously. SAN FRANCISCO -- Three years ago, in a hallway at Intel, a small team of people working on drones discussed whether it would be possible to fly one hundred drones over the Robert Noyce Building, Intel's headquarters in Santa Clara, and have them form the shape of the company's logo. They didn't plan on pursuing it seriously but it became a pet project for Natalie Cheung, who wondered at the time how they could fly multiple drones with one pilot. Now, Cheung is the general manager of Drone Light Shows at Intel and has helped put on hundreds of choreographed drone shows -- and the drones can make a lot more shapes than just the Intel logo.


Elon Musk, DeepMind and AI researchers promise not to develop robot killing machines

The Independent

Elon Musk and many of the world's most respected artificial intelligence researchers have committed not to build autonomous killer robots. The public pledge not to make any "lethal autonomous weapons" comes amid increasing concern about how machine learning and AI will be used on the battlefields of the future. The signatories to the new pledge – which includes the founders of DeepMind, a founder of Skype, and leading academics from across the industry – promise that they will not allow the technology they create to be used to help create killing machines. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


Pentagon sees quantum computing as key weapon for war in space

FOX News

Top Pentagon official Michael Griffin sat down a few weeks ago with Air Force scientists at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio to discuss the future of quantum computing in the U.S. military. Griffin, the undersecretary of defense for research and engineering, has listed quantum computers and related applications among the Pentagon's must-do R&D investments. Quantum computing is one area where the Pentagon worries that it is playing catchup while China continues to leap ahead. The technology is being developed for many civilian applications, and the military sees it as potentially game-changing for information and space warfare. The U.S. Air Force particularly is focused on what is known as quantum information science.


Secretive US 'Phantom Express' hypersonic spaceplane passes key tests

Daily Mail

A major milestone for a secretive hypersonic spaceplane the military could one day use to launch satellites at short notice have been completed. The reusable Phantom Express spaceplane will take off vertically and land horizontally, and is being built by Boeing as part of the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Experimental Spaceplane program, and its engines have now passed a key test. It is hoped it will play a crucial role in future space warfare, allowing military bosses to launch satellites and replace damaged ones within hours. The reusable Phantom Express spaceplane will take off vertically and land horizontally, and is being built by Boeing as part of the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Experimental Spaceplane program. The Pentagon's research arm now test-fired the new rocket engine 10 times in as many days, a critical step toward a space plane that can put satellites in orbit on a daily basis, project officials said.


Hacker Sold US Air Force Drone Documents on Dark Web for $150

#artificialintelligence

While tracking criminal activity on dark web marketplaces, a threat intelligence team Insikt Group of the security research firm Recorded Future discovered a hacker selling classified military documents for a meager amount of $150-200 on the Deep Web and Dark Web forum. According to the research team, the hacker got a hold on the documents after they intruded by exploiting an FTP vulnerability in Netgear routers that's been known for two years. Once the hacker got an access to the router, the intruder was easily able to invade into a captain's personal computer and steal a cache of sensitive documents. "While such course books are not classified materials on their own," Recorded Future said, "in unfriendly hands, they could provide an adversary the ability to assess technical capabilities and weaknesses in one of the most technologically advanced aircrafts." The documents include contained sensitive materials, like "the M1 Abrams maintenance manual, a tank platoon training course, a crew survival course, and documentation on improvised explosive device (IED) mitigation tactics."


Pentagon sees quantum computing as key weapon for war in space - SpaceNews.com

#artificialintelligence

Top Pentagon official Michael Griffin sat down a few weeks ago with Air Force scientists at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio to discuss the future of quantum computing in the U.S. military. Griffin, the undersecretary of defense for research and engineering, has listed quantum computers and related applications among the Pentagon's must-do R&D investments. Quantum computing is one area where the Pentagon worries that it is playing catchup while China continues to leap ahead. The technology is being developed for many civilian applications and the military sees it as potentially game-changing for information and space warfare. The U.S. Air Force particularly is focused on on what is known as quantum information science.


A hacker tried selling stolen military drone documents for $200

Mashable

Researchers at the cybersecurity firm Recorded Future recently released a report about one of its more interesting findings. While scouring the hacker forums on the dark web, the firm's analysts discovered someone selling MQ-9 Reaper drone documents -- maintenance books, training guides, and a list of airmen assigned to the military drone. The hacker was looking for $150-200 for the documentation. SEE ALSO: Hackers steal $23.5 million from cryptocurrency exchange Bancor That may seem a strangely low asking price, and according to Andrei Barysevich, a Recorded Future analyst, it is. The hacker was advertising the documents as classified information, but while they are only made available to military and its contractors, they aren't classified.