Computer Engineering


Deep learning reconstructs holograms

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Deep learning has been experiencing a true renaissance especially over the last decade, and it uses multi-layered artificial neural networks for automated analysis of data. Deep learning is one of the most exciting forms of machine learning that is behind several recent leapfrog advances in technology including for example real-time speech recognition and translation as well image/video labeling and captioning, among many others. Especially in image analysis, deep learning shows significant promise for automated search and labeling of features of interest, such as abnormal regions in a medical image. Now, UCLA researchers have demonstrated a new use for deep learning – this time to reconstruct a hologram and form a microscopic image of an object. In a recent article that is published in Light: Science & Applications, a journal of the Springer Nature, UCLA researchers have demonstrated that a neural network can learn to perform phase recovery and holographic image reconstruction after appropriate training.


DEEP LEARNING RECONSTRUCTS HOLOGRAMS

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Deep learning has been experiencing a true renaissance especially over the last decade, and it uses multi-layered artificial neural networks for automated analysis of data. Deep learning is one of the most exciting forms of machine learning that is behind several recent leapfrog advances in technology including for example real-time speech recognition and translation as well image/video labeling and captioning, among many others. Especially in image analysis, deep learning shows significant promise for automated search and labeling of features of interest, such as abnormal regions in a medical image. Now, UCLA researchers have demonstrated a new use for deep learning – this time to reconstruct a hologram and form a microscopic image of an object. In a recent article that is published in Light: Science & Applications, a journal of the Springer Nature, UCLA researchers have demonstrated that a neural network can learn to perform phase recovery and holographic image reconstruction after appropriate training.


World's first talking sex robot is ready for her close-up

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That's when a San Marcos company will unveil Harmony, an anatomically correct sex doll with a patented animatronic talking head with programmable personality and memory. News of creator Matt McMullen's latest invention -- he's been making lifelike silicone sex dolls for 20 years -- has created international media interest and a firestorm of criticism from ethicists and futurists who see a dark side to a sex doll that becomes more "human" with each technological innovation. McMullen grew up drawing, painting and working in mixed-media art until in his 20s he discovered a passion for sculpting, specializing in creating lifelike female figures 12 to 18 inches tall. But when a flood of customers asked him to make the dolls anatomically correct for sexual purposes, he went with the flow.


Artificial skin lets robot hand feel hot or cold

USATODAY

A robot hand with artificial skin reaches for a glass of ice water. Researchers at the University of Houston have created an artificial skin that allows a robotic hand to sense the difference between heat and cold. The discovery of stretchable electronics could have a significant impact in the wearables market, with devices such as health monitors or biomedical devices, says Cunjiang Yu, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Houston and the lead author for the paper. When the stretchable electronic skin was applied to a robotic hand, it could tell the difference between hot and cold water.


Automation replaced 800,000 workers… then created 3.5 million new jobs

AITopics Custom Links

These days, it’s tough to avoid newspaper headlines warning that artificial intelligence is coming for your job. The problem is that, often, the only thing these oversimplifications get right is that there is in fact an important connection between automation and work. What’s surprising is how many examples there are of AI acting as the catalyst for new hiring, higher wages, and happier employees. But of course AI success stories aren’t as exciting as the “job-stealing robots” narrative. The reality is that the impact of AI on the workforce is complex, nuanced, and still very much in transition.


In the Future, Warehouse Robots Will Learn on Their Own

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"It figures out the best way to grab each object, right from the middle of the clutter," said Jeff Mahler, one of the researchers developing the robot inside a lab at the University of California, Berkeley. Inside Amazon's massive distribution centers -- where sorting through stuff is the primary task -- armies of humans still do most of the work. The Berkeley robot was all the more remarkable because it could grab stuff it had never seen before. Mr. Mahler and the rest of the Berkeley team trained the machine by showing it hundreds of purely digital objects, and after that training, it could pick up items that weren't represented in its digital data set.


Things You Can Do With an Extra Robotic Arm

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

Having extra robotic limbs sure sounds cool, in theory. The robotic arm that the Cornell researchers are experimenting with is a new design that's a compromise between an extra arm mounted on the torso and extra fingers (or an extra thumb) mounted on the hand. Sadly, this led the researchers to conclude that they should pursue the idea of an extra robotic arm as "a valuable tool in a professional setting" rather than "a valuable tool in a three-armed ultimate frisbee league." As much as the idea of a third robotic arm might sound awesome, when people start trying to use them in practical settings, all kinds of issues show up.


Opinion How to Regulate Artificial Intelligence

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The technology entrepreneur Elon Musk recently urged the nation's governors to regulate artificial intelligence "before it's too late." Mr. Musk insists that artificial intelligence represents an "existential threat to humanity," an alarmist view that confuses A.I. systems (for example, the safety of autonomous vehicles) rather than trying to define and rein in the amorphous and rapidly developing field of A.I. I propose three rules for artificial intelligence systems that are inspired by, yet develop further, the "three laws of robotics" that the writer Isaac Asimov introduced in 1942: A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm; a robot must obey the orders given it by human beings, except when such orders would conflict with the previous law; and a robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the previous two laws.


Blossom: A Handmade Approach to Social Robotics from Cornell and Google

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

Guy Hoffman, who is well known for the fascinating creativity of his robot designs, has been working on a completely new kind of social robot in a collaboration between his lab at Cornell and Google ZOO's creative technology team in APAC. Guy Hoffman: Looking at the design of the huge number of social robots revealed in recent years, there are a lot of repetitive features: white shiny plastic with metal or black accents, glass screens and smooth, rounded lines and edges. The soft components give the robot a physical compliance which make Blossom move in an imperfect, lifelike way, and would be impossible to recreate with rigid components. The Blossom project is a collaboration between Hoffman's lab at Cornell and the team at Google ZOO's creative technology team in APAC.


We can't ban killer robots – it's already too late Philip Ball

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One response to the call by experts in robotics and artificial intelligence for an ban on "killer robots" ("lethal autonomous weapons systems" or Laws in the language of international treaties) is to say: shouldn't you have thought about that sooner? There are shades of science-fictional preconceptions in a 2012 report on killer robots by Human Rights Watch. Besides, there's a continuum between drone war, soldier enhancement technologies and Laws that can't be broken down into "man versus machine". By all means let's try to curb our worst impulses to beat ploughshares into swords, but telling an international arms trade that they can't make killer robots is like telling soft-drinks manufacturers that they can't make orangeade.