Alzheimer s disease


AI brain chips will 'evolve' humanity into 'zombies'

Daily Mail

AI brain chips are set to'evolve' humanity into a'community of zombies', a prominent neuroscientist has claimed. Those implanting AI into their mind risk merging with machines to the point that humans and androids are indistinguishable from one another, the expert said. It was recently revealed that a tech company backed by billionaire Elon Musk is developing a'brain-computer interface' that could give people super intelligence and allow them to communicate telepathically. Dr Mikhail Lebedev, a senior neuroscientist at Duke University in Durham claims AI brain chips are set to'evolve' humanity into a'community of zombies' (stock image) Kernel is currently working on prototypes of a brain implant device for medical use in humans. The firm has started to conduct tests with epilepsy patients in hospitals.


Humans 2.0: meet the entrepreneur who wants to put a chip in your brain

The Guardian

Bryan Johnson isn't short of ambition. The founder and CEO of neuroscience company Kernel wants "to expand the bounds of human intelligence". He is planning to do this with neuroprosthetics; brain augmentations that can improve mental function and treat disorders. Put simply, Kernel hopes to place a chip in your brain. It isn't clear yet exactly how this will work.


How artificial intelligence will affect opportunity

#artificialintelligence

Several Texas A&M researchers are working on various innovative applications for Artificial Intelligence (AI), intelligent systems, machine learning and natural language processing technologies. For instance, computer engineering assistant professor Zhangyang "Atlas" Wang said his group works broadly in the general fields of computer vision, machine learning and multimedia signal processing. "My research is mainly focused on Artificial Intelligence -- machine learning or deep learning -- for disease diagnostics, to be more specific, use computational method to predict Alzheimer's disease," computer science Ph.D. candidate Ye Yuan, who works with Wang, said. "Other projects in our group include action recognition & privacy preserving, pixelated image abstraction, optimization algorithms for neural network design, etc." The end goal of the research, according to Yuan, is to provide a better AI algorithm for detecting and classifying data such as medical scans.


One season of football increases risk of brain injury

Daily Mail

School-aged football players are at an increased risk of long-term effects in the brain after just one season of play, according to new research. Two new studies conducted on children aged nine to 17 found changes in the area of the brain known as the default mode network (DMN), which is active while a person's mind is wandering and responsible for processing emotions. The effects were seen in both players with and without a history of concussion, but were even greater in those who had suffered at least one in the past. This study adds to the mounting evidence that concussions due to football lead to serious changes in the brain including multiple sclerosis, impaired emotions, depression and most popularly CTE, which was found in former professional football player Aaron Hernandez. The studies conducted at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, and Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, used Head Impact Telemetry System (HITS) helmets on players with and without a history of concussion for an entire season.


Doctors have trouble diagnosing Alzheimer's. AI doesn't

#artificialintelligence

Alzheimer's disease is notoriously difficult to diagnose -- the only way doctors can tell for sure that a patient has the deadly neurodegenerative condition is to examine his or her brain during an autopsy after death. That uncertainty is hard on patients who are starting to experience memory loss, which could be an early sign of Alzheimer's or another, more treatable form of dementia. It also poses a major challenge to the researchers who are working to come up with effective treatments for the disease, which afflicts some 5 million Americans. But now artificial intelligence is learning to do what doctors can't. Separate teams of scientists at the University of Bari in Italy and McGill University in Canada have created artificial intelligence algorithms that can look at brain scans of people who are exhibiting memory loss and tell who will go on to develop full-blown Alzheimer's disease and who won't.


How will artificial intelligence change healthcare?

#artificialintelligence

When Amazon first came out with a smart recommendation algorithm for customers, millions of consumers receive their first tailored shopping experience personalized to their own interests. This changed the consumer world and introduced us to a whole new era of shopping. Amazon's algorithms, using a method called "item-to-item collaborative filtering", are able to provide targeted shopping recommendations by creating a personalized experience for each person. Even in a very basic form, this was the beginning of using machine learning in a very practical manner. But can such artificial intelligence and machine learning also act as an enabler for changes in medicine and healthcare, as much as Amazon's algorithm changed consumerism?


Researchers Find Pathological Signs Of Alzheimer's In Dolphins, Whose Brains Are Much Like Humans'

International Business Times

A team of scientists in the United Kingdom and the U.S. recently reported the discovery of pathological signs of Alzheimer's disease in dolphins, animals whose brains are similar in many ways to those of humans. This is the first time that these signs – neurofibrillary tangles and two kinds of protein clusters called plaques – have been discovered together in marine mammals. As neuroscience researchers, we believe this discovery has added significance because of the similarities between dolphin brains and human brains. The new finding in dolphins supports the research team's hypothesis that two factors conspire to raise the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in dolphins. Those factors are: longevity with a long post-fertility life span – that is, a species living, on average, many years after the child-bearing years are over – and insulin signaling.


People who are good at video games are more intelligent

Daily Mail

Two popular video games act like IQ tests, with the most intelligent players gaining the highest scores, research has shown. Both games, League of Legends and Defence of the Ancients 2 (DOTA 2) involve chess-like strategic thinking. Scientists discovered that high levels of skill in both games correlated with having a high IQ. A similar association has been seen between IQ and chess performance. Two popular video games act like IQ tests, with the most intelligent players gaining the highest scores, research has shown.


Brain chips will be as popular as smartphones in 15 years

Daily Mail

Implanting a microchip into your brain to unlock its full potential may sound like the plot from the latest science fiction blockbuster. But the futuristic technology could become a reality within 15 years, according to Bryan Johnson, an expert working on such a device. The chips will allow people to buy and delete memories, and will soon be as popular as smartphones, Mr Johnson claims. Implanting a microchip into your brain to unlock its full potential may sound like the plot from the latest science fiction blockbuster. Kernel is currently working on prototypes of a brain implant device for medical use in humans.


Outcry as scientists implant tiny human brains inside rats

Daily Mail

Tiny human brains connected to the minds of rats have sparked a major ethical debate among researchers. Two papers being presented at a renowned US neuroscience conference this week claim to have hooked human brain tissue to the minds of rats and mice. Ethicists have questioned whether the move could one day give the animals a consciousness, meaning they will be entitled to'respect' in future. It could even mean injected rodents cross the species barrier with humans to become an intelligent hybrid organism. Tiny brains connected to the minds of rats have sparked a major ethical debate.