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Image Classification in Machine Learning [Intro + Tutorial]

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Image Classification is one of the most fundamental tasks in computer vision. It has revolutionized and propelled technological advancements in the most prominent fields, including the automobile industry, healthcare, manufacturing, and more. How does Image Classification work, and what are its benefits and limitations? Keep reading, and in the next few minutes, you'll learn the following: Image Classification (often referred to as Image Recognition) is the task of associating one (single-label classification) or more (multi-label classification) labels to a given image. Here's how it looks like in practice when classifying different birds-- images are tagged using V7. Image Classification is a solid task to benchmark modern architectures and methodologies in the domain of computer vision. Now let's briefly discuss two types of Image Classification, depending on the complexity of the classification task at hand. Single-label classification is the most common classification task in supervised Image Classification.


Protecting payments in an era of deepfakes and advanced AI

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In the midst of unprecedented volumes of e-commerce since 2020, the number of digital payments made every day around the planet has exploded – hitting about $6.6 trillion in value last year, a 40 percent jump in two years. With all that money flowing through the world's payments rails, there's even more reason for cybercriminals to innovate ways to nab it. To help ensure payments security today requires advanced game theory skills to outthink and outmaneuver highly sophisticated criminal networks that are on track to steal up to $10.5 trillion in "booty" via cybersecurity damages, according to a recent Argus Research report. Payment processors around the globe are constantly playing against fraudsters and improving upon "their game" to protect customers' money. The target invariably moves, and scammers become ever more sophisticated.


10 Best AI Courses: Beginner to Advanced

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Are you looking for the Best Certification Courses for Artificial Intelligence?. If yes, then your search will end after reading this article. In this article, I will discuss the 10 Best Certification Courses for Artificial Intelligence. So, give your few minutes to this article and find out the Best AI Certification Course for you. Artificial Intelligence is changing our lives.


6 Best AI (Artificial Intellligence) Courses for Healthcare in 2022

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Artificial Intelligence plays an important role in Healthcare in various ways like brain tumor classification, medical image analysis, bioinformatics, etc. So if you are interested to learn AI for healthcare, I have collected 6 Artificial Intelligence Courses for Healthcare. I hope these courses will help you to learn Artificial Intelligence for healthcare. Before we move to the courses, I would like to explain the importance of Artificial Intelligence in the healthcare industry. According to the World Health Organization, there are 60% of cases where the health of an individual and their lifestyle are associated.


CLIP-GEN Overview

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Training a text-to-image generator in the general domain like DALL-E, GauGAN, and CogView requires huge amounts of paired text-image data, which can be problematic and expensive. In this paper, the authors propose a self-supervised scheme named CLIP-GEN for general text-to-image generation with the language-image priors extracted with a pre-trained CLIP model. Only a set of unlabeled images in the general domain is required to train a text-to-image generator. First, the embedding of the image in the united language-vision embedding space is extracted with the CLIP encoder. Next, the image is converted into a sequence of discrete tokens in the VQGAN codebook space (the VQGAN can be trained using unlabeled data).


Are You Better Than a Machine at Spotting a Deepfake?

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Sarah Vitak: This is Scientific American's 60 Second Science. Early last year a TikTok of Tom Cruise doing a magic trick went viral. I mean, it's all the real thing."] Matt Groh: A deepfake is a video where an individual's face has been altered by a neural network to make an individual do or say something that the individual has not done or said. Vitak: That is Matt Groh, a Ph.D. student and researcher at the M.I.T. Media Lab. Groh: It seems like there's a lot of anxiety and a lot of worry about deepfakes and our inability to, you know, know the difference between real or fake. Vitak: But he points out that the videos posted on the Deep Tom Cruise account aren't your standard deepfakes. The creator, Chris Umé, went back and edited individual frames by hand to remove any mistakes or flaws left behind by the algorithm. It takes him about 24 hours of work for each 30-second clip. It makes the videos look eerily realistic. But without that human touch, a lot of flaws show up in ...


AI system securely detects cancer from patient data

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Artificial intelligence (AI) can analyse large amounts of data, such as images or trial results, and can identify patterns often undetectable by humans, making it highly valuable in speeding up disease detection, diagnosis and treatment. But using the technology in medical settings can be controversial because of the risk of accidental data release. Many systems are owned and controlled by private companies, giving them access to confidential patient data – and the responsibility for protecting it. A team of researchers has set out to discover whether a form of AI called swarm learning could be used to help computers predict cancer in medical images of patient tissue samples, without releasing the data from hospitals. Their research, titled'Swarm learning for decentralized artificial intelligence in cancer histopathology', was published on April 25 in Nature Magazine.


AI Will Be a Double-Edged Sword in Future Cyber Conflicts

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We have got to work our way through how we're going to deal with this. It is not the if, it's only the when to me," Adm. Mike Rogers, former chief of the National Security Agency and U.S. Cyber Command, remarked in an interview. During his presidency, Barack Obama shared his concerns about an attacker using artificial intelligence (AI) to access launch codes for nuclear weapons. "If that's its only job, if it's self-teaching and it's just a really effective algorithm, then you've got problems," Obama said. AI opens up a set of new risks and opportunities for the military and intelligence community. It is, however, important to be more precise about how AI applications impact different types of military and intelligence activities. Discussing the use of AI in cyber operations is not about whether technology or humans will be more important in the future. It is about how AI can make sure developers, operators, administrators, and other personnel of cyber organizations or hacking groups ...


How to Fix Quantum Computing Bugs

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It is a law of physics that everything that is not prohibited is mandatory. They are everywhere: in language, cooking, communication, image processing and, of course, computation. Mitigating and correcting them keeps society running. You can scratch a DVD yet still play it. QR codes can be blurred or torn yet are still readable. Images from space probes can travel hundreds of millions of miles yet still look crisp. Error correction is one of the most fundamental concepts in information technology.


Singaporean wins $100k prize in challenge to build AI models that detect deepfakes

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SINGAPORE - A one-man team comprising Singaporean research scientist Wang Weimin beat 469 other teams from around the world in a five-month-long challenge to develop the best artificial intelligence (AI) model for detecting deepfakes, or digitally altered video clips. Mr Wang's model was 98.53 per cent accurate at telling apart genuine clips from those that featured digitally manipulated faces, voices or both. On Friday (April 29), the National University of Singapore graduate was awarded first place and a cash prize of $100,000 in the Trusted Media Challenge organised by AI Singapore, a national AI programme office under the National Research Foundation. Mr Wang, who works at Chinese tech giant ByteDance, which owns TikTok, was also offered a $300,000 start-up grant to commercialise his invention. But he said he is hoping to incorporate his AI model into his company's BytePlus platform and offer deepfake detection as a service to its clients.