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The best gaming laptops under $1,000: Best overall, best battery life, and more

PCWorld

If you're jonesing for a powerful gaming experience but you're really strapped for cash, there are a number of budget options to consider. You can actually get some pretty decent CPU and GPU performance out of a budget gaming laptop. You just may need to dial back your graphics settings to hit that hallowed 60 frames per second mark in the latest cutting-edge games. If you're not sure where to begin, don't sweat it. We've done the hard work for you and curated a list of the best gaming laptops that fall under the $1,000 mark.


The best laptops for graphic design: Best overall, Best for video game designers, and more

PCWorld

Whether you're creating a sleek new logo for your company or a magazine cover that's popping with bright colors and interesting shapes, graphic designers need the right kind of laptop to get the job done. The most important thing is powerful hardware. For tasks like 3D modeling, you're going to need a powerful CPU and a good amount of RAM. Depending on the size and complexity of the project, you may need a processor with multiple cores. Another essential piece of hardware is the graphics card.


Apple redesigns the MacBook Air with a bigger screen and M2 chip

Engadget

Somehow, it's already been almost four years since Apple redesigned the MacBook Air with a Retina display. That laptop got a big performance upgrade in late 2020 as one of the first computers to ship with Apple's M1 silicon, but lately the device has started to feel long in the tooth. As expected, Apple is refreshing the MacBook Air today with the just-announced M2 chip inside and a larger, 13.6-inch display. It also includes MagSafe for the first time in years, just like the 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pro that Apple released last fall. It also has two Thunderbolt ports (now you don't have to give one up for charging) and a headphone jack.


Introducing Accelerated PyTorch Training on Mac

#artificialintelligence

In collaboration with the Metal engineering team at Apple, we are excited to announce support for GPU-accelerated PyTorch training on Mac. Until now, PyTorch training on Mac only leveraged the CPU, but with the upcoming PyTorch v1.12 release, developers and researchers can take advantage of Apple silicon GPUs for significantly faster model training. This unlocks the ability to perform machine learning workflows like prototyping and fine-tuning locally, right on Mac. The MPS backend extends the PyTorch framework, providing scripts and capabilities to set up and run operations on Mac. MPS optimizes compute performance with kernels that are fine-tuned for the unique characteristics of each Metal GPU family.


We ran every test you could think of on the M1 Ultra

Engadget

We've now tested every version of Apple's M1 processor, from the first M1 chip in the 13-inch Macbook Pro all the way up to the M1 Ultra in the new Mac Studio, and the chip's ability to scale performance is pretty incredible. The M1 Ultra fuses two M1 Max chips together to get you a processor with 20 CPU cores and 64 GPU cores, along with up to 128GB of RAM, and it's one of the fastest processors we've ever tested. We asked what tests you'd like to see run on the M1 Ultra and assembled quite a list, including Adobe Lightroom and Premiere Pro, Davinci Resolve and Fusion, 3D modeling in Blender, machine learning tests like TensorFlow and Pytorch, and even some gaming. Amazingly, the M1 Ultra really does seem to be around twice as fast as the M1 Max in most applications. Whatever overhead is required to shuffle data around such a large chip, it rarely impacts CPU performance.


Sparse Transformers

#artificialintelligence

Originally published on Towards AI the World's Leading AI and Technology News and Media Company. If you are building an AI-related product or service, we invite you to consider becoming an AI sponsor. At Towards AI, we help scale AI and technology startups. Let us help you unleash your technology to the masses. If you want to analyze how fast 19 sparse BERT models perform inference, you'll only need a YAML file and 16GB of RAM to find out.


Vizy Review: Raspberry Pi Computer Vision Made Simple

#artificialintelligence

When the Raspberry Pi 4 burst onto the scene, with four 1.5 GHz CPU cores and up to 8GB of RAM there was a gasp from the community. The extra horsepower provided those interested in machine learning and AI to finally use the Raspberry Pi to power their projects. Over time, TensorFlow and TensorFLow Lite saw numerous upgrades and finally cemented the Raspberry Pi as the ideal low cost introduction to the topic. The problem is, where do we start? Vizy from Charmed Labs, starting at $259 for a unit that comes with a Raspberry Pi 4 2GB or $269 - $299 for 4 or 8GB, is a smart camera for those starting out with machine learning.



The best gaming laptops under $1,000: Best overall, best battery life, and more

PCWorld

If you're jonesing for a zippy gaming experience but you're really strapped for cash, there are a number of budget options to consider. You can actually get some pretty decent CPU and GPU performance out of a budget gaming laptop, though you may need to dial your gaming visuals back from their maximum settings to hit that hallowed 60 frames per second mark in the latest cutting-edge games. If you're not sure where to begin, don't sweat it. We've done the hard work for you and curated a list of gaming laptops that fall under the $1,000 mark. We've also included a couple of other options for those that can stretch their budget a little bit further to crank up the eye candy.


Surface Laptop Studio review: Microsoft's top new quirky portable PC

The Guardian

The Surface Laptop Studio is Microsoft's creative workstation that replaces the unique outgoing Surface Book line with a slightly more normal laptop-like form but is still very unusual. From the top it doesn't look that unusual: a standard laptop made of magnesium and aluminium with a traditional hinge at the back. Open the lid and it has more than a passing resemblance to the Apple's MacBook Pro from the 2010s, with a decent-sized and great-looking 14.4in LCD touchscreen with a slick 120Hz refresh rate. It has Windows Hello face recognition for logging in, four good speakers, a great keyboard and a new "haptic touchpad" that brings Microsoft's trackpads up to par with the best-in-class models from Apple. But grab the display at the top and twist it backwards and things get interesting. The screen magnetically unclips at the bottom so you can position it in "stage mode" on magnets hidden just in front of the trackpad or fold it all the way down on to the deck in "studio mode".