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Web Mining


How is AI-driven Web Scraping Beneficial for Your Business?

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With businesses going online now, the demand for web scraping is on the rise. Here, in this article, I talk about the benefits of using AI-driven web scraping. In the coming days, there will be more and more thrust on analysis of data scraped from competitor's websites prevailing in the market space. Based on this information, strategists and business owners will be able to chalk out a robust business strategy. New and reformed strategies will emerge out of the analysis of data extracted from a host of business websites.


Web Scraping without getting blocked

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Web scraping or crawling is the fact of fetching data from a third party website by downloading and parsing the HTML code to extract the data you want. But you should use an API for this! Not every website offers an API, and APIs don't always expose every piece of information you need. So it's often the only solution to extract website data. So, what is the problem? The main problem is that most websites do not want to be scraped.


Web Scraping for Machine Learning with SQL Database

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The Full Stack AI/ML Engineer toolkit needs to include web scraping, because it can improve predictions with new quality data. I thought, how can we angle "Web Scraping for Machine Learning", and I realized that Web Scraping should be essential to Data Scientists, Data Engineers and Machine Learning Engineers. The Full Stack AI/ML Engineer toolkit needs to include web scraping, because it can improve predictions with new quality data. Machine Learning inherently requires data, and we would be most comfortable, if we have as much high quality data as possible. But what about when the data you need is not available as a dataset?


What is Web Scraping: Introduction, Applications and Best Practices

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However, manually copy data from multiple sources for retrieval in a central place can be very tedious and time-consuming. "Web scraping," also called crawling or spidering, is the automated gathering of data from an online source usually from a website. While scraping is a great way to get massive amounts of data in relatively short timeframes, it does add stress to the server where the source hosted. However, as long as it does not disrupt the primary function of the online source, it is relatively acceptable. Despite its legal challenges, web scraping remains popular even in 2019.


Web Scraping using Selenium

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Web Scraping is a popular methodology to extract data from websites. This is often done to derive insights for Sentiment Analysis, Predicting User preferences, Cross-Selling products, etc. Some of the real-life examples of web scraping include – extracting data for pricing analysis, user ratings for movie sentiment analysis, corporate admin tasks to read and classify log files in an HTML, search bots trying to make sense of a results page. While web scraping activity does not provide intelligence of its own, as we have seen above the data extracted can be useful in multiple ways. A more common use case would be a start-up eCommerce website trying to set a price on its products based on market research on competitors.


AI web scraping augments data collection

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Web scraping involves writing a software robot that can automatically collect data from various webpages. Simple bots might get the job done, but more sophisticated bots use AI to find the appropriate data on a page and copy it to the appropriate data field to be processed by an analytics application. AI web scraping-based use cases include e-commerce, labor research, supply chain analytics, enterprise data capture and market research, said Sarah Petrova, co-founder at Techtestreport. These kinds of applications rely heavily on data and the syndication of data from different parties. Commercial applications use web scraping to do sentiment analysis about new product launches, curate structured data sets about companies and products, simplify business process integration and predictively gather data.


Web Scraping Product Data in R with rvest and purrr

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This article comes from Joon Im, a student in Business Science University. Joon has completed both the 201 (Advanced Machine Learning with H2O) and 102 (Shiny Web Applications) courses. Joon shows off his progress in this Web Scraping Tutorial with rvest. I recently completed the Part 2 of the Shiny Web Applications Course, DS4B 102-R and decided to make my own price prediction app. The app works by predicting prices on potential new bike models based on current existing data.


Web scraping for machine learning

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There is a universal rule for buying stuff, "paying less money is better than paying more money". For personal reasons I needed to buy a used car but I was not in a hurry, I had time to think about it and find the best deal. When checking the local used car shops, they showed me cars in the range of 7.000 to 10.000 euro. This is a lot of money so I thought I should use my data science skills to find the best deal. First thing we need for a machine learning project is data.


More than 267 millions of Facebook user phone numbers exposed online

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Security expert Bob Diachenko, along with Comparitech, has discovered more than 267 million Facebook user IDs, phone numbers and names in an unsecured database. The huge trove of data is likely the result of an illegal scraping operation or Facebook API abuse by a group of hackers in Vietnam. The exposed data could be used by threat actors to conduct large-scale SMS spam and phishing campaigns. "A database containing more than 267 million Facebook user IDs, phone numbers, and names was left exposed on the web for anyone to access without a password or any other authentication." "Comparitech partnered with security researcher Bob Diachenko to uncover the Elasticsearch cluster.


Recreating

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"The Clock" is a 2010 art installation by Christian Marclay. It is an experimental film that features over 12,000 individual shots of clocks from movies and television, edited in such a way that the film itself functions as a clock. In this talk, we'll use modern machine learning models and video web scraping to recreate the concept behind "The Clock". We'll use Kubernetes to orchestrate building a modern video scraper, capable of getting around the walls of YouTube and Instagram to grab user content. We'll then use existing machine learning models to infer when clocks occur in videos, to create our own montage with the found internet video.