The Future


AI Is Killing the Uncanny Valley and Our Grasp on Reality Backchannel

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There's a revolution afoot, and you will know it by the stripes. Earlier this year, a group of Berkeley researchers released a pair of videos. In the second video, the horse is suddenly sporting a zebra's black-and-white pattern. The execution isn't flawless, but the stripes fit the horse so neatly that it throws the equine family tree into chaos. Turning a horse into a zebra is a nice stunt, but that's not all it is.


Rise of the robots and all the lonely people Letters

The Guardian

Two connected stories in Monday's Guardian: Tom Watson asks us to "embrace an android" while Rachel Reeves describes society's sixth giant evil as a "crisis of loneliness". Replacing people with machines decreases opportunities for social interactions helping many feel integrated. Self-service in shops, libraries, banks and other places means people can go all day without conversation with a "real" person. It is set to worsen, to the detriment of contact and service quality. It is no coincidence that Lidl, the fastest-growing supermarket, resisted moves to self-service tills until recently.


Artificial Intelligence Is Killing the Uncanny Valley and Our Grasp on Reality

WIRED

There's a revolution afoot, and you will know it by the stripes. Earlier this year, a group of Berkeley researchers released a pair of videos. In the second video, the horse is suddenly sporting a zebra's black-and-white pattern. The execution isn't flawless, but the stripes fit the horse so neatly that it throws the equine family tree into chaos. Turning a horse into a zebra is a nice stunt, but that's not all it is.


The robots are coming - but humans still have upper hand

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AS artificial intelligence (AI) becomes more sophisticated and its ability to perform human tasks accelerates with the advances in machine learning, we're just beginning to realise what part we as humans will still have to play, in the future. From the tools invented during the stone age like an axe or spear, to the first Gutenberg printing press, mankind has used technology to reduce or even eliminates physical and mental effort. However that doesn't make it easy for those whose jobs are affected by the imposed changes. In some cases it causes staff to be considerably uncomfortable. The thought process until now has been to develop technology to handle specific routine tasks.


AI won't destroy us, and Tesla is proof

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Ignore the noise about a "Terminator scenario" in which machines become self-aware and seek to destroy their flawed human masters. Those of us who live and work in the "salt mines" of machine learning and artificial intelligence are almost universally unafraid. Still, a few well-known technical folk heroes continue to push this "sky is falling" narrative. The most prolific of them is Elon Musk, famed founder of Tesla and SpaceX. Not only do I think he's wrong, I think his own company, Tesla Motors, is a compelling proof point against his argument.


The Human Factor In An AI Future

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As artificial intelligence becomes more sophisticated and its ability to perform human tasks accelerates exponentially, we're finally seeing some attempts to wrestle with what that means, not just for business, but for humanity as a whole. From the first stone ax to the printing press to the latest ERP solution, technology that reduces or even eliminates physical and mental effort is as old as the human race itself. However, that doesn't make each step forward any less uncomfortable for the people whose work is directly affected – and the rise of AI is qualitatively different from past developments. Until now, we developed technology to handle specific routine tasks. A human needed to break down complex processes into their component tasks, determine how to automate each of those tasks, and finally create and refine the automation process.


The Future of AI in Law Enforcement - Intel

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Last year, the FBI reported 465,676 entries for missing children in the United States.1 Many of those children are runaways--either from their homes or the care of a social services agency. A nonprofit organization serves as a clearinghouse for critical information that can help find these children. When electronic service providers detect suspicious activity that might be a clue to locate a missing child, they pass the tip on to the organization, where analysts attempt to pinpoint a physical location for the suspected perpetrator and then deliver that information to the proper law enforcement agency as quickly as possible. The volume of tips is massive.


The future of Artificial Intelligence in Mental Health

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The mental image of AI has always been that of a non-sentient being conversing meaningfully with us, starting as an assistant, and potentially taking over control from humans. In reality, AI is on our phone already, not just as Siri or Allo, but in map navigation, image correction, face recognition, deciding which ads we see and what products are recommended to us. We also live in a world where one in four people suffer from mental disorders, making it one of the leading causes of disability and ill-health. Technology has become an addiction, and it often blamed as the cause of rising mental health issues. Could Artificial intelligence help it become the cure instead?


the-future-of-artificial-intelligence-in-education.22853.html

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When talking about the uses of AI in the education process, the possibilities are endless and, from that perspective at least, we're living astonishing days. So, are you ready to welcome Artificial Intelligence in a classroom near you? Just like computers, smartphone or the internet itself, AI will modify the function and face of education, its core'why, what and how?' Many students will have robot TA's instead of human ones that will be sharper in answering their queries, rate their assignments or set-up a meeting. Recent estimations show that the use of AI in the educational field is expected to grow up to a mind-blowing 47.5% by 2021.


Reflecting on an imaging milestone with a look into its AI future

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How healthcare has evolved from the first clinically useful image to a library of images analyzed by AI In August 1980, a team from Scotland made a breakthrough in imaging. Setting the stage for the widespread use of MRI scans, they obtained the first clinically useful image of a patient's internal tissues. Almost 30 years later, breakthroughs in imaging are becoming the normal. While there are juxtaposed views around the potential of the technology, both skeptics and supporters know there's transformative potential. That's why one hospital system is pinpointing what's been holding AI back and developing the business model, platform and tools to ensure clinicians and patients can benefit from its potential.