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Science Fiction


The Cyborg Revolution: Are They Here Yet?

#artificialintelligence

The cyborgs are upon us. Turns out, they're more'enhanced reality' and less'science fiction.' In 1998, Professor of Cybernetics Kevin Warwick had a chip implanted in his body that would open electronic doors and turn on lights as he passed. In 2002, he had a 100 electrode array wired into the nervous system of his arm to allow him to remotely control an artificial hand. Performance artist Stelios Arcadiou (who has changed his name to Stelarc) has spent 10 years growing an artificially-created ear that is surgically attached to his left arm. In 2009, Jerry Jalava, a Finnish computer engineer who lost part of a finger in a motorcycle accident, turned his prosthetic finger into a USB drive.


Can Science Fiction Wake Us Up to Our Climate Reality?

The New Yorker

This content can also be viewed on the site it originates from. Last summer, the science-fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson went on a backpacking trip with some friends. They headed into the High Sierra, hiking toward Deadman Canyon--a fifty-mile walk through challenging terrain. Now sixty-nine, Robinson has been hiking and camping in the Sierras for half a century. At home, in Davis, California, he tracks his explorations on a wall-mounted map, its topography thick with ink.


4 times Shakespeare has inspired stories about robots and AI

#artificialintelligence

Science fiction is a genre very much associated with technological marvels, innovations, and visions of the future. So it may be surprising to find so many of its writers are drawn to Shakespeare – he's a figure associated with tradition and the past. Sometimes his plays are reworked in a science fiction setting. The 1956 film Forbidden Planet is just one of many variations on a "Tempest in space" theme. Sometimes the playwright appears as a character caught up in a time travel adventure.


Council Post: What Is The Future Of Artificial Intelligence In Photo Editing?

#artificialintelligence

Ben Meisner is the Founder of the leading online photo editing platform Ribbet.com. Artificial intelligence (AI) may seem like a buzzword of the 21st century, but it entered the human psyche some time ago. A Harvard article on the history of AI points out that science fiction brought the concept into our minds in the first half of the 20th century through characters like the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz and the humanoid robot impersonating Maria in Metropolis. Mankind is now taking the concept from idea to reality, and today AI has tremendous application in everything from medicine, construction and finance to home appliances, social media and copywriting. It has the unique capability to quickly learn from significant amounts of data, enabling it to tackle some of our most challenging technological issues.


Four times Shakespeare has inspired stories about robots and AI

#artificialintelligence

Science fiction is a genre very much associated with technological marvels, innovations, and visions of the future. So it may be surprising to find so many of its writers are drawn to Shakespeare – he's a figure associated with tradition and the past. Sometimes his plays are reworked in a science fiction setting. The 1956 film Forbidden Planet is just one of many variations on a "Tempest in space" theme. Sometimes the playwright appears as a character caught up in a time travel adventure.


Four times Shakespeare has inspired stories about robots and AI

#artificialintelligence

Science fiction is a genre very much associated with technological marvels, innovations, and visions of the future. So it may be surprising to find so many of its writers are drawn to Shakespeare – he's a figure associated with tradition and the past. Sometimes his plays are reworked in a science fiction setting. The 1956 film Forbidden Planet is just one of many variations on a "Tempest in space" theme. Sometimes the playwright appears as a character caught up in a time travel adventure.


As the Super Bowl nears kickoff, 'Who Can Forget?' relives some of the most iconic game day commercials

FOX News

The highly-anticipated Super Bowl LVI takes the field in just a few weeks, scheduled to be played on February 13, 2022, at SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, California. And while the Big Game is inarguably the biggest television event of the year – with last year's record-low viewership still drawing in an astounding 92 million watchers - it's no wonder ad space can cost as much as $6 million for just 30 seconds of time. If you happen to identify with a large percentage of the population that's perhaps more interested in the myriad of big-budget, high-profile commercials that air between gameplay than the game itself, look no further than 38 years back in time. FOX NATION REVEALS THE MOST OUTRAGEOUS, TRAGIC, AND FASCINATING STORIES OF THE YEAR Fox Nation's'Who Can Forget 1984?' dedicates one of the show's standard top ten positions to celebrating that year's commercial success, breaking down two of the most-talked-about Super Bowl XVIII commercials: But almost 40 years ago, it wasn't the household name it is today -- until a Super Bowl XVIII ad changed the game. The commercial, a takeoff of George Orwell's dystopian social science fiction novel "1984," was heralded as a masterpiece.


A Holocaust Survivor's Hardboiled Science Fiction

The New Yorker

This content can also be viewed on the site it originates from. In "His Master's Voice," a 1968 sci-fi novel by the Polish writer Stanisław Lem, a team of scientists and scholars convened by the American government try to decipher a neutrino signal from outer space. They manage to translate a fragment of the signal's information, and a couple of the scientists use it to construct a powerful weapon, which the project's senior mathematician fears could wipe out humanity. The intention behind the message remains elusive, but why would an advanced life-form have broadcast instructions that could be so dangerous? Late one night, a philosopher on the team named Saul Rappaport, who emigrated from Europe in the last year of the Second World War, tells the mathematician about a time--"the year was 1942, I think"--when he nearly died in a mass execution.


Matterhorn sways to a seismic beat, interstellar propulsion system remains science fiction, goldfish drives a car – Physics World

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The Matterhorn, an Alpine peak that straddles the border between Switzerland and Italy, is one of the most iconic mountains in the world. Isolated at the head of the Zermatt Valley, climbing the perfectly shaped mountain, which has a summit height of 4470 m above sea level, is on the to-do list of thousands of climbers – and some physicists. In 2019, an international team of scientists set out to take a closer look at the Matterhorn and installed several seismometers at different locations to record its movement. They found that despite the Matterhorn appearing like a huge immovable mass, it is in fact constantly on the move, swaying gently back and forth about once every two seconds. The researchers say that this subtle vibration, with a fundamental frequency of 0.42 Hz, is stimulated by seismic energy in the Earth originating from oceans and earthquakes, as well as – rather surprisingly – human activity.


Was Voltaire the First Sci-Fi Author?

WIRED

Ada Palmer is a professor of European history at the University of Chicago. Her four-volume science fiction series, Terra Ignota, was inspired by 18th-century philosophers such as Voltaire and Diderot. "I wanted to write a story that Voltaire might have written if Voltaire had been able to read the last 70 years' worth of science fiction and have all of those tools at his disposal," Palmer says in Episode 495 of the Geek's Guide to the Galaxy podcast. Palmer says that Voltaire could actually be considered the first science fiction writer, thanks to a piece he wrote in 1752. "Voltaire has a short story called'Micromégas,' in which an alien from Saturn and an alien from a star near Sirius come to Earth, and they are enormous, and they explore the Earth and have trouble finding life-forms because to them a whale is the size of a flea," she says.