Case-Based Reasoning


Colorado Jury's Pot Verdict May Discourage Similar Cases

U.S. News

A Colorado jury likely threw cold water on future legal challenges against cannabis companies by homeowners who consider filing racketeering lawsuits alleging proximity to pot operations hurts their property values, analysts and industry lawyers said Thursday.


Germany won't export arms to Saudi 'in current situation': Merkel

The Japan Times

BERLIN – German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Sunday that Berlin would not export arms to Saudi Arabia for now in the wake of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi's violent death. "I agree with all those who say when it comes to our already limited arms exports (to Saudi Arabia) that they cannot take place in the current situation," she told reporters at her party headquarters. Her foreign minister, Heiko Maas, had already said on Saturday that he currently saw "no basis for decisions in favor of arms exports to Saudi Arabia. Germany last month approved €416 million ($480 million) worth of arms exports to Saudi Arabia for 2018. In the past, military exports by Berlin to Riyadh have mostly consisted of patrol boats. Merkel reiterated that she condemned Khashoggi's killing "in the strongest terms" and saw an "urgent need to clear up" the case. "We are far from seeing everything on the table and the perpetrators being brought to justice," she said. Merkel added that she would continue to consult with international partners about a coordinated reaction to the case. Germany and Saudi Arabia only returned their ambassadors in September after 10 months of frosty relations following criticism from Berlin of what it said was Saudi interference in Lebanese affairs. The Khashoggi case has opened a serious new rift with European partners Britain, France and Germany saying in a joint statement earlier that Saudi Arabia must clarify how Khashoggi died inside its Istanbul consulate, and its account must "be backed by facts to be considered credible.


Jamal Khashoggi Is Dead. Here's What We Know.

NYT > Middle East

The bulk of evidence has come from leaks by Turkish authorities to pro-government news outlets. That information included the identification of 15 Saudis who Turkish officials said had been sent to assassinate Mr. Khashoggi and dispose of his body. Details in an audio recording from inside the consulate show that Saudi agents were waiting when Mr. Khashoggi walked into the building, and that he was dead within minutes, a senior Turkish official said. The audio revealed that Mr. Khashoggi was beheaded and dismembered, and his fingers severed, and that within two hours the killers were gone. The New York Times confirmed that at least nine of the 15 suspects identified by Turkish authorities worked for the Saudi security services, military or other government ministries.


Taking machine thinking out of the black box

#artificialintelligence

Software applications provide people with many kinds of automated decisions, such as identifying what an individual's credit risk is, informing a recruiter of which job candidate to hire, or determining whether someone is a threat to the public. In recent years, news headlines have warned of a future in which machines operate in the background of society, deciding the course of human lives while using untrustworthy logic. Part of this fear is derived from the obscure way in which many machine learning models operate. Known as black-box models, they are defined as systems in which the journey from input to output is next to impossible for even their developers to comprehend. "As machine learning becomes ubiquitous and is used for applications with more serious consequences, there's a need for people to understand how it's making predictions so they'll trust it when it's doing more than serving up an advertisement," says Jonathan Su, a member of the technical staff in MIT Lincoln Laboratory's Informatics and Decision Support Group.


Taking machine thinking out of the black box

MIT News

Software applications provide people with many kinds of automated decisions, such as identifying what an individual's credit risk is, informing a recruiter of which job candidate to hire, or determining whether someone is a threat to the public. In recent years, news headlines have warned of a future in which machines operate in the background of society, deciding the course of human lives while using untrustworthy logic. Part of this fear is derived from the obscure way in which many machine learning models operate. Known as black-box models, they are defined as systems in which the journey from input to output is next to impossible for even their developers to comprehend. "As machine learning becomes ubiquitous and is used for applications with more serious consequences, there's a need for people to understand how it's making predictions so they'll trust it when it's doing more than serving up an advertisement," says Jonathan Su, a member of the technical staff in MIT Lincoln Laboratory's Informatics and Decision Support Group.


Bayesian Patchworks: An Approach to Case-Based Reasoning

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Doctors often rely on their past experience in order to diagnose patients. For a doctor with enough experience, almost every patient would have similarities to key cases seen in the past, and each new patient could be viewed as a mixture of these key past cases. Because doctors often tend to reason this way, an efficient computationally aided diagnostic tool that thinks in the same way might be helpful in locating key past cases of interest that could assist with diagnosis. This article develops a novel mathematical model to mimic the type of logical thinking that physicians use when considering past cases. The proposed model can also provide physicians with explanations that would be similar to the way they would naturally reason about cases. The proposed method is designed to yield predictive accuracy, computational efficiency, and insight into medical data; the key element is the insight into medical data, in some sense we are automating a complicated process that physicians might perform manually. We finally implemented the result of this work on two publicly available healthcare datasets, for heart disease prediction and breast cancer prediction.


Net neutrality activists, state officials are taking the FCC to court. Here's how they'll argue the case.

Washington Post

Opponents of the Federal Communications Commission have outlined their chief arguments on net neutrality to a federal appeals court in Washington, in hopes of undoing the FCC's move last year to repeal its own rules for Internet service providers. The legal briefs reflect a widening front in the multipronged campaign by consumer groups and tech companies to rescue the ISP regulations, which originally barred providers from blocking websites or slowing them. With the FCC's changes, Internet providers may legally manipulate Internet traffic as it travels over their infrastructure, as long as they disclose their practices to consumers. The FCC's decision last year to repeal the rules was "arbitrary and capricious," said officials from the state of New York, the California Public Utilities Commission and others in court documents Monday -- asking the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to overrule the agency. The FCC was too credulous in accepting industry promises "to refrain from harmful practices," the officials said, "notwithstanding substantial record evidence showing that [Internet] providers have abused and will abuse their gatekeeper roles in ways that harm consumers and threaten public safety."


Harvey Weinstein seeks to dismiss case based on accuser's emails

BBC News

Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein is seeking to get the criminal case against him thrown out of court. On Friday, his lawyers filed a defence motion citing dozens of "warm" emails they say Mr Weinstein received from one of his accusers after an alleged rape. His team argue prosecutors should have shared the evidence with the Grand Jury that indicted him. Mr Weinstein has pleaded not guilty to six charges involving three different women. The accuser in question has retained her anonymity.


10 Ways To Improve Cloud ERP With AI & Machine Learning

Forbes Technology

Capitalizing on new digital business models and the growth opportunities they provide are forcing companies to re-evaluate ERP's role. Made inflexible by years of customization, legacy ERP systems aren't delivering what digital business models need today to scale and grow. Legacy ERP systems were purpose-built to excel at production consistency first at the expense of flexibility and responsiveness to customers' changing requirements. By taking a business case-based approach to integrating Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning into their platforms, Cloud ERP providers can fill the gap legacy ERP systems can't. Companies need to be able to respond quickly to unexpected, unfamiliar and unforeseen dilemmas with smart decisions fast for new digital business models to succeed.


Judge Won't Toss Manafort Case Based on Leak Allegations

U.S. News

In a statement, AP spokeswoman Lauren Easton said that AP journalists "met with representatives from the Department of Justice in an effort to get information on stories they were reporting, as reporters do. During the course of the meeting, they asked DOJ representatives about a storage locker belonging to Paul Manafort, without sharing its name or location."